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11/08/2018 | Press release | Distributed by Public on 11/08/2018 05:22

Royal Navy rehearse remembrance drills ahead of Cenotaph commitments

I am so proud to be part of the Queen Alexandra Royal Naval Nursing Service and the Royal Navy and that I can represent them at the Cenotaph on Sunday. I have recently returned from operations in South Sudan where as part of UNMISS we are helping to improve conditions for people living there.

Leading Naval Nurse Chelsie Rice

The group representing the Royal Navy are made up of a Royal Navy 96-man guard (90 Junior Rates, 6 Senior Rates and 3 Officers at the front), a Royal Marines 48-man guard.

Those chosen to take part regard selection as a great honour, and commit to thorough training each day plus hours of kit preparation in the evenings in order to display the best traditions and standards of the Royal Navy.

As well as marching at the Cenotaph, those taking part will also have a role to play in the Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall, and the Lord Mayor's Parade.

For the first time all personnel taking part were given a commemorative coin to mark the occasion and their commitment to the training involved.

They were each handed their coin by Rear Admiral Surface Ships Jerry Kyd who has just returned from sailing HMS Queen Elizabeth on her maiden deployment.

He said: 'This year's commemoration for the centenary of the end of the First World War is really a very special thing but it's also about all of those Armed Forces personnel who have given their lives in all the conflicts since then.

'To mark this we have given each person a challenge coin as a token of our appreciation for representing the Naval Service this year.'

Leading Naval Nurse Chelsie Rice, 24, of Motherwell said: 'I am so proud to be part of the Queen Alexandra Royal Naval Nursing Service and the Royal Navy and that I can represent them at the Cenotaph on Sunday.

'I have recently returned from operations in South Sudan where as part of UNMISS we are helping to improve conditions for people living there. We had to work under quite extreme conditions so it was very humbling to think that the South Sudanese experience that every day of their lives.'