UN - United Nations

11/23/2020 | Press release | Distributed by Public on 11/23/2020 19:03

Adopting 10 Resolutions on Cooperation with Regional Groups, General Assembly Fills Subsidiary Body Vacancies, Re-Elects High Commissioner for Refugees

The General Assembly adopted 10 resolutions today promoting cooperation between the United Nations and a host of regional and international organizations, and re‑elected Filippo Grandi (Italy) as High Commissioner for Refugees until 30 June 2023.

Acting on the recommendations of its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) and of the Secretary‑General, the Assembly also filled vacancies in several of its subsidiary bodies and postponed the United Nations Pledging Conference for Development Activities to early 2021 due to the COVID‑19 pandemic.

In a note to the Assembly (document A/75/338), the Secretary‑General said he had intended to request that Member States elect Mr. Grandi for a further five‑year term. He added, however, that the High Commissioner was agreeable, owing to personal reasons, to a shorter term of two and a half years.

The Assembly first elected Mr. Grandi, a former Commissioner‑General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), on 18 November 2015 for a five‑year term, succeeding António Guterres, the current Secretary‑General of the United Nations. (For details, see Press Release GA/11726.)

In other business, the Assembly took up the Secretary‑General's report on cooperation between the United Nations and 26 regional and other organizations (document A/75/345) and his notes on cooperation between the Organization and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (document A/75/128) and on the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear‑Test‑Ban Treaty Organization (document A/75/153).

The 10 draft resolutions, adopted by consensus, highlighted the Organization's cooperation with such bodies as the Council of Europe, Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), League of Arab States, Organization of Islamic Cooperation, the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization.

Ukraine's representative, in an explanation of position, disassociated his delegation from a resolution on United Nations cooperation with the Commonwealth of Independent States, which he said encourages members to violate international law. He also disassociated himself with part of a resolution on the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization, asking that body to correct a map on its website that depicts Crimea as part of the Russian Federation.

Lassina Zerbo, Executive Secretary of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear‑Test‑Ban Treaty Organization, introduced its annual report. Welcoming the entry into force in January 2021 of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, he said the instrument has elevated and widened a discussion on atomic bombs that has not been seen in years. He hoped that the renewed focus on nuclear threats will lead to progress on the entry into force of the Test‑Ban Treaty, adopted by the Assembly in 1996, which has so far been signed by 184 nations, but unable to enter into force until it is ratified by eight of its Annex 2 States.

At the meeting's outset, the Assembly filled vacancies in: Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions; Committee on Contributions; Investments Committee; Independent Audit Advisory Committee; United Nations Staff Pension Committee; International Civil Service Commission; Committee for Programme and Coordination; and the Committee on Conferences. In addition, it requested Mexico and the United States to recommend candidates for appointment to the Joint Inspection Unit.

Delivering statements today were representatives of Montenegro, Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, Norway, Mauritania, Romania, Algeria, Viet Nam, United Arab Emirates, Brazil, Singapore, Argentina and Malaysia.

Observers for INTERPOL and the League of Arab States also spoke.

Representatives of Turkey, Azerbaijan, Cyprus and Armenia spoke in exercise of the right of reply.

The Assembly will reconvene on Tuesday, 1 December, at 10 a.m. to consider, among other things, the Secretary‑General's report on the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration. It will also hold a commemoration for victims of the Second World War, which ended 75 years ago.

Elections and Appointments

The Assembly took up reports from its Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) on the appointment of members to the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions (ACABQ) (document A/75/579); Committee on Contributions (document A/75/580); Investments Committee (document A/75/581);the International Civil Service Commission (document A/75/582); the Independent Audit Advisory Committee (document A/75/583); and the United Nations Staff Pension Committee (document A/75/584).

Delegates first turned their attention to 10 three‑year slots on the 16‑member Advisory Committee, which plays a crucial role in helping the Fifth Committee examine the Organization's budget and manage its employees. The Assembly appointed Abdallah Bachar Bong (Chad); Nabil Kalkoul (Algeria); and Caroline Nalwanga (Uganda), from the Group of African States; Feliksas Bakanauskas (Lithuania) and Pavel Chernikov (Russian Federation), from the Group of Eastern European States; Julia A. Maciel (Paraguay) and Juliana Gaspar Ruas (Brazil), from the Group of Latin American and Caribbean States; Vidisha Maitra (India), from the Group of Asia‑Pacific States; and DonnaMarie Chiurazzi‑Maxfield (United States) and Cihan Terzi (Turkey), from the Group of Western European and Other States. They were nominated by their Governments for appointment or reappointment to three‑year terms, beginning on 1 January 2021.

For the 18‑member Committee on Contributions, which advises the Assembly on the distribution of the Organization's expenses among Member States, the Assembly appointed or reappointed six people for three‑year terms that start 1 January 2021. They are Michael Holtsch (Germany), Henrique da Silveira Sardinha Pinto (Brazil), Jisun Jun (Republic of Korea), Vadim Laputin (Russian Federation), Lin Shan (China) and Steve Townley (United Kingdom).

For the nine‑member Investments Committee, which advises the Secretary‑General on investment strategy and reviews the investments of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund, the Assembly appointed four persons to serve as regular members for three‑year terms, beginning on 1 January 2021. They are Yasir O. al‑Rumayyan (Saudi Arabia), Sarah Omotunde Alade (Nigeria), Natalia Khanjenkova (Russian Federation) and Patricia Parise (Argentina). In addition, the Assembly appointed Michael Klein (United States) as Chair of the Investments Committee, also starting on 1 January 2021, and reappointed Macky Tall (Mali) as an ad hoc member for a one‑year term beginning on 1 January 2021.

Next, the Assembly turned to the five pending vacancies on the 15‑member International Civil Service Commission, an independent body established by the Assembly to regulate and coordinate service conditions for thousands of staff throughout the United Nations Common system. The full Commission meets twice a year. It appointed, or reappointed, to four‑year terms, beginning 1 January 2021 the following: Larbi Djacta (Algeria) and El Hassane Zahid (Morocco) from the Group of African States; Pan Suk Kim (Republic of Korea) and Wang Xiaochu (China) from the Group of Asia-Pacific States; and Igor Golubovskiy (Russian Federation) from the Group of Eastern European States.

For the five‑member Independent Audit Advisory Committee, a subsidiary body that serves in an expert advisory capacity and helps the Assembly fulfil its oversight responsibilities, the Assembly appointed Thembekile Kimi Makwetu (South Africa) and reappointed Janet St. Laurent (United States) to a three‑year term beginning 1 January 2021.

The Assembly filled eight slots - four members and four alternate members - open with the United Nations Staff Pension Committee, which administrates pension matters. It appointed or reappointed these eight people to four‑year terms of office beginning 1 January 2021: Ahmed Al Kabir (Bangladesh), Dmitry S. Chumakov (Russian Federation), Lovemore Mazemo (Zimbabwe), Philip Richard Okanda Owade (Kenya), Pía Poroli (Argentina), Jörg Stosberg (Germany), David Traystman (United States) and Tomoya Yamaguchi (Japan).

The Assembly then considered vacancies on the Committee for Programme and Coordination, outlined in a note by the Secretary‑General (document A/75/248), and declared elected those nominated by the Economic and Social Council, namely, Armenia, Belarus, Brazil, Cameroon, Costa Rica, Cuba, Eritrea, Eswatini, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Mali, Malta, Pakistan, Poland, United Kingdom and the United States, to a three‑year term of office beginning 1 January 2021.

As of 1 January 2021, the following States will remain members of the Committee: Angola, Argentina, China, Comoros, Ethiopia, France, Liberia, Mauritania, Paraguay, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation and Uruguay.

It then turned its attention to the election of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. It had before it a note by the Secretary‑General (document A/75/338) in which he explained that he intended to request the Assembly to elect Filippo Grandi for a further term of five years. He added, however, that owing to personal reasons, Mr. Grandi is agreeable to a shorter term of two and a half years. He went on to propose that Mr. Grandi's term in office be extended for that reduced period, beginning on 1 January 2021 and ending on 30 June 2023.

The Assembly, acting without a vote, then re‑elected Mr. Grandi as United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees for a period of two and a half years, beginning on 1 January 2021 and ending on 30 June 2023.

Finally, it turned to the Committee on Conferences, which advises the Assembly on matters pertaining to United Nations conferences, and considered a note of the Secretary‑General, contained in document A/75/88. It took note that the Assembly President, following consultations with the chairs of regional groups, has appointed France, Kenya, Malaysia, Nigeria, Russian Federation and Sri Lanka for a period of three years, beginning on 1 January 2021. One vacancy, to be chosen among the Latin American and Caribbean States, remains to be filled for a three‑year term beginning on 1 January 2021 and expiring on 31 December 2023.

Operational Activities for Development

Acting without a vote, the Assembly adopted a draft decision (document A/75/L.26), submitted by its President, to postpone the United Nations Pledging Conference for Development Activities to early 2021 due to COVID‑19 measures currently in place at the Organization's premises. The pledging conference would normally have convened early in November.

VOLKAN BOZKIR (Turkey), President of the Assembly, announced that the work of the Second Committee (Economic and Financial) will be extended until 10 December.

Cooperation between United Nations and Regional Organizations

The Assembly then held a debate on cooperation between the United Nations and regional and other organizations, taking up a report of the Secretary‑General (document A/75/345) and his notes (documents A/75/128 and A/75/153), and taking action on related draft resolutions.

LASSINA ZERBO, Executive Secretary of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear‑Test‑Ban Treaty Organization, in a pre‑recorded video message, introduced its report for 2019, transmitted in the Secretary‑General's note (document A/75/153). 'These are troubled times,' he said, noting that COVID‑19 is spreading at an alarming pace at a time when the international community is confronted with sharp divisions and rising geopolitical tensions. The challenges range from climate change and terrorism to the risk posed by advanced technologies and localized disputes becoming transboundary in nature. Weapons of mass destruction, however, remain the greatest immediate threat both in scale and consequence. In such a context, States cannot afford to pursue their own narrow self‑interests, he said, emphasizing that multilateralism is the only viable approach and that the United Nations is needed now more than ever before to advance peace and prosperity through mutual cooperation.

Finishing the unfinished business of the Test‑Ban Treaty is crucial, he said. While that instrument has yet to enter into force, a strong partnership between the Preparatory Commission and the United Nations has made it possible to build support for the Treaty and its verification regime. He noted that the work is nearing completion on the most far‑reaching monitoring system ever designed and that such capabilities are still being improved upon. He also underscored the role that women, youth and developing countries can play in achieving a world free of nuclear weapons. The pandemic has been a stress test for the Preparatory Commission, but it responded swiftly to ensure business continuity, putting the verification regime at a high level of operational readiness.

'We are ready for the world' and the world in turn is ready for the Test‑Ban Treaty, he said, emphasizing that it is time to pivot towards better bridge building, with room for negotiation and compromise. While various approaches to nuclear disarmament and non‑proliferation have been proposed in recent years, one that achieved success most recently this is the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which will enter into force in January 2021. Its ultimate effectiveness remains to be seen, but the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons has elevated and widened a discussion on atomic weaponry that has not been seen in years. Hopefully, the renewed focus on nuclear threats will lead to progress on the Test‑Ban Treaty, he said, asking Member States to focus on the mutually shared goal of a legally binding and verifiable end to nuclear testing, which is a crucial step towards a nuclear‑weapon‑free world and a stronger role for multilateralism in advancing international peace and security.

MILICA PEJANOVIĆ ĐURIŠIĆ (Montenegro) introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Central European Initiative' (document A/75/L.16) on behalf of the initiative's 17 members. The relationships between the United Nations and regional organizations have even greater importance during the COVID‑19 pandemic. The initiative's commitment to concerted actions and a decisive and comprehensive approach was emphasized during the Extraordinary Virtual Meeting of Central European Initiative Heads of Government, held during the presidency of Montenegro in May. The initiative has established a task force with the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe to accelerate regional coordination and response, and self‑standing actions were introduced to effectively tackle the region's challenges. During its 30 years of existence, the initiative has helped build the region's democratic capacity and stronger partnerships among its Member States.

YASHAR T. ALIYEV (Azerbaijan) introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization for Democracy and Economic Development - GUAM' (document A/75/L.17), which acknowledges efforts to develop partnership relations with the United Nations and its Member States. Noting goals to promote regional cooperation in areas from trade and economic development to youth and tourism, he emphasized the importance of strengthening dialogue and coordination with the United Nations system and invited the United Nations Secretary‑General to engage in regular consultations with the Secretary‑General of the Organization for Democracy and Economic Development.

BAKHTIYOR IBRAGIMOV (Uzbekistan) introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Commonwealth of Independent States' (document A/75/L.19). The current global health crisis has once again proven that all States are interconnected and demonstrates the extreme importance of regular dialogue, trust and close cooperation. As Chair of the Commonwealth of Independent States in 2020, Uzbekistan has developed a road map to step up cooperation among members. 'L.19' features a technical update of the biennial draft, which reaffirms the importance of international cooperation in solving economic, social, cultural and humanitarian problems.

ODD INGE KVALHEIM (Norway), also on behalf of Brazil, introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)' (document A/75/L.20). The fundamental purposes of the biennial draft continue to be taking stock of and strengthening cooperation and raising awareness among Member States about INTERPOL's role at the United Nations. 'L.20' reflects recent shifts in international criminal justice priorities, including the impact of the COVID‑19 pandemic on the vulnerabilities that drive crime, and also recognizes the importance of effective policing in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, while urging deeper cooperation on issues of gender parity. 'The institutional relationship between the United Nations and INTERPOL has been deepened, ultimately strengthening international police cooperation and law enforcement efforts worldwide,' he concluded.

SIDI MOHAMED LAGHDAF (Mauritania) introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the League of Arab States' (document A/75/L.21). Among other things, 'L.21' requests the secretariats of both organizations to follow up on the implementation of the recommendations and resolutions of the fourteenth sectoral meeting to assist the Arab States in eradicating the increasing poverty resulting from the outbreak of the COVID‑19 pandemic. It also emphasizes the crucial importance of intensifying cooperation between the special envoys of both entities, who are addressing the current crises in the region in order to develop effective solutions.

ION JINGA (Romania) introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization' (document A/75/L.22). As its Chair-in-Office, Romania has focused on boosting intergovernmental cooperation in the region, reflected in the draft resolution's references to activities and initiatives over the past two years. Substantive and technical updates include language on the pandemic, reaffirming that the crisis requires a global response, and also salutes the United Nations on its seventy-fifth anniversary.

NAZIM KHALDI (Algeria) introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization' (document A/75/L.23). Noting that Algeria is its current Chair, he underscored the political value of this biennial text, stating that close cooperation between the United Nations and the Preparatory Committee serves the interests of the international community. Synergies between the two organizations are mutually beneficial and must be pursued with determination. He expressed confidence that the Assembly will adopt 'L.23' by consensus, thus keeping nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation at the top of its agenda.

DINH QUY DANG (Viet Nam) introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations' (document A/75/L.25), on behalf of ASEAN. The long-standing cooperation between the organizations has promoted dialogue and stability in the region and fostered collaboration across a wide range of political, social and economic areas. 'L.25' reiterates the importance of regional integration and encourages the United Nations support in implementing the Master Plan on Association of Southeast Asian Nations Connectivity 2025. It also asks the Secretary‑General to submit a report on the present resolution to the Assembly at its seventy-seventh session.

LANA ZAKI NUSSEIBEH (United Arab Emirates) introduced the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation' (document A/75/L.27). Reaffirming both the entities' shared objectives in conflict resolution, prevention and promoting a culture of peace alongside the common goals in the Middle East peace process, 'L.27' recognizes cooperation between the Organization of the Islamic Conference and United Nations bodies, including the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN-Women). Addressing complex challenges requires a comprehensive multilateral approach, she said, expressing hope that the draft resolution would be adopted by consensus.

RONALDO COSTA FILHO (Brazil) said 'L.20' goes beyond a technical rollover and reflects the transitional criminal landscape emerging as a result of the COVID‑19 pandemic, adding that the support and input of the INTERPOL team in New York and Member States resulted in a draft resolution that is substantive and balanced, and outlines priorities and respects sensitivities. 'This positive outcome was the result of innovative work methodologies and a lot of outreach and informal discussions,' he said, highlighting the limits placed on in-person negotiations resulting from coronavirus mitigation measures.

ANN-MARGARET MATHEW (Singapore) said the international community benefits from increased interaction between the United Nations and regional organizations, adding that the number of resolutions being adopted today attests to the broad network of partnerships the Organization has forged. For its part, the ASEAN‑United Nations partnership contributes to the realization of peace, stability and sustainable development in the region. Turning to 'L.20', she said Singapore, which hosts the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation, will continue to enhance cooperation with that organization.

MARÍA DEL CARMEN SQUEFF (Argentina), introducing the draft resolution 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)' (document A/75/L.20), noted the importance of accessing justice to protect the rights of victims from scourges caused by criminal groups. 'L.20' recognizes and calls for cooperation on counter‑terrorism efforts and on tackling such illicit activities as human and drug trafficking, destruction of cultural heritage and crimes using information and communications technology and social media. The draft resolution would further urge States to promote gender equality in law enforcement, she said, adding that Argentina will continue to cooperate with INTERPOL in Buenos Aires, a hub for countries in South America.

NUR ATIQA MD AKIM (Malaysia), welcoming continued cooperation between the United Nations and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear‑Test‑Ban Treaty Organization, said the instrument is a key element of the global nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation architecture. It will also complement existing legal instruments relating to nuclear disarmament and non‑proliferation, such as the Treaty on the Non‑Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The Test‑Ban Treaty's expeditious entry into force is very important and long overdue, she said, urging Annex 2 States to sign and ratify it without further delay. She also expressed appreciation for efforts of the Preparatory Commission's Provisional Technical Secretariat to carry out business during the COVID‑19 pandemic.

ELISABETH NEUGEBAUER, an observer for INTERPOL, said 'L.20' made the tabling of a second review possible. Recalling various new and increasingly complex challenges, she warned of a skyrocketing rise in cybercrime. As a result, INTERPOL launched an awareness campaign in May, she said, adding that strengthening international police cooperation will be the only way to stay ahead of the curve. The INTERPOL cooperation framework, connecting law enforcement agencies in 194 member countries, rests on its apolitical and neutral character, while strictly adhering to rules on data processing. INTERPOL also supports law enforcement officers with tangible operational assistance. Emphasizing its strong relationship with the United Nations, she said INTERPOL can provide insights from a global police perspective to all United Nations discussions.

MAGED ABDELFATTAH ABDELAZIZ, an observer for the League of Arab States, associating himself with the Arab Group, expressed appreciation for the emergency measures taken to organize the current session's work, but said marginalizing observers by not allowing them to be present limited their capacity to take part in discussions. As such, he proposed tangible measures to ensure they are allowed to physically participate in the Organization's work and activities in the future. Commending the work and cooperation efforts of the Department of Peace Operations and the Secretary‑General, he underscored the need to cease foreign interference in the internal affairs of League members. Highlighting the results of the fourteenth meeting of the League of Arab States in Cairo on fighting poverty, he said its next meeting should focus on how to fight pandemics and achieve sustainable development by 2030.

The representative of Ukraine, explaining his delegation's position on 'L.19', said intensified regional engagements reflect a vital component of conflict resolution. However, recent events under the Russian Federation-led Commonwealth of Independent States will not lead to a regional dispute settlement. The Commonwealth of Independent States encourages members to further violate international law, as the Russian Federation has done against Ukraine, he said, noting that the organization has not condemned such actions and citing recent events in Belarus. As such, his delegation disassociates itself from the draft resolution. On 'L.22', he said his delegation opposes any attempts to use the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization to manipulate the Charter of the United Nations regarding the Crimean Peninsula and Sevastopol, Ukraine. Asking for the removal of a link to documents with a map displaying Crimea as part of the Russian Federation, he said he opposed any of Moscow's narratives that violate international law. For these reasons, Ukraine disassociates itself from operative paragraph 9.

The Assembly then adopted the following draft resolutions without a vote: 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Central European Initiative' (document A/75/L.16); 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization for Democracy and Economic Development - GUAM' (document A/75/L.17); 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)' (document A/75/L.19); 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)' (document A/75/L.20); 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the League of Arab States' (document A/75/L.21); 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization' (document A/75/L.22); 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization' (document A/75/L.23); 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Latin American and Caribbean Economic System' (document A/75/L.24); 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)' (document A/75/L.25); and 'Cooperation between the United Nations and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation' (document A/75/L.27).

Joint Inspection Unit

The Assembly then turned to the appointment of members of the Joint Inspection Unit, the only independent external oversight body of the United Nations system mandated to conduct evaluations, inspections and investigations system‑wide. It took up a related note by the Secretary‑General (document A/75/603), which stated that the Assembly, during its current session, will need to fill vacancies that will arise upon the expiry of the terms of office of its Chair, Eileen Cronin (United States), and Jorge Flores Callejas (Honduras), on 31 December 2021. The appointees will serve five-year terms, beginning on 1 January 2022.

As the Western Europe and Others Group had one endorsed country for one vacant seat - namely, the United States - that country will be requested to propose a candidate for appointment.

Since, however, from among the Latin American and Caribbean States, there are two candidates for one vacancy, the Assembly conducted an advisory vote by secret ballot, in accordance with its Rules of Procedure, to select which country would be requested to propose a candidate for appointment.

The result of the vote was as follows:

Number of ballots

180

Number of invalid ballots

0

Number of valid ballots

180

Abstentions

1

Number of voters present

179

Required majority

90

Mexico

131

Peru

48

Mexico was thus requested to propose a candidate for appointment to the Unit.

The Assembly noted that candidates should have experience in at least one of the following fields: oversight, audit, inspection, investigation, evaluation, finance, project evaluation, programme evaluation, human resources management, management, public administration, monitoring and/or programme performance, alongside knowledge of the United Nations system and its role in international relations. Therefore, Eritrea, Germany, Republic of Moldova and Spain will be requested to submit the names of candidates and the curricula vitae highlighting relevant qualifications. After holding consultations, the President will submit the proposed candidates' names to the Assembly for appointment.

Cooperation between United Nations and Regional Organizations (Continued)

In the afternoon, the Assembly continued to hear representatives explain their delegations' positions following the adoption of related draft resolutions.

The representative of Germany, speaking on behalf of the European Union, said cooperation with Latin America is very important, and while supporting 'L.24', he regretted to note no references to the Paris Agreement on climate change and the 2030 Agenda. Expressing support for 'L.27', on the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, he was disappointed to see a reference to its 2025 Programme of Action.

The representative of Georgia, explaining her delegation's position on 'L.19', expressed support for regional organizations and the advancement of their goals, but could not support the Commonwealth of Independent States - as the Russian Federation continues to violate the sovereignty and territorial integrity of its neighbouring nations - and therefore disassociates from consensus. Having joined consensus on 'L.22', she expressed full support for engagement with the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization but disassociates from operative paragraph 9, as the information provided is inaccurate and raises concerns about some Member States.

The representative of Syria said that, as a founding member of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, his delegation supports relations with countries that have been founded with mutual respect. As Syria has borne the full brunt of terrorism, he called on all nations to tackle common challenges together. Expressing hope that the Organization could become a forum that reflects peace, he called on it to exercise its full will and to re-establish the full rights of all Member States.

The representative of Canada said his delegation had joined consensus on 'L.27', but disassociates itself from preambular paragraph 4, as Ottawa opposes initiatives that unfairly single out Israel for criticism.

The representative of Australia said his delegation supports 'L.27' but disassociates itself from preambular paragraph 4. Australia does not support the unfair targeting of Israel.

The representative of the United States disassociated his delegation from references to WHO in 'L.16' and, with regard to 'L.19', expressed concern with human rights in the member nations of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Noting the United States is an observer at the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organization, he disassociated from the reference to WHO in 'L.22' and referred to a general statement made in the Second Committee on 18 November regarding the resolution's mention of the 2030 Agenda and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. Turning to 'L.24', he said preambular paragraph 3 lacked clarity and referred again to his delegation's 18 November statement. He went on to disassociate from references in 'L.27' to Organization of Islamic Cooperation 2025 Programme of Action, saying that its treatment of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one-sided, politicized and fails to contribute to resolving the situation.

The representative of Armenia, referring to 'L.27', said the Organization of Islamic Cooperation Programme of Action contains formulations that go against principles for resolving the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. His delegation therefore disassociates itself from preambular and operative paragraphs that contain references to the Programme of Action.

The representative of Israel said references in 'L.27' to the Organization of Islamic Cooperation's Programme of Action is yet another attack on her State. With some members of that entity injecting 'poisonous false information' in every resolution, she said it is regrettable to see another organization hijacked to push an anti-Israel agenda. Her delegation joined consensus on 'L.27', but disassociated itself from preambular paragraph 4.

The representative of the United Kingdom said that while his delegation supports 'L.27', he was disappointed that the 2025 Programme of Action continues to be referenced in the text. The United Kingdom recognizes Cyprus and expresses hopes that its concerns will be noted.

Right of Reply

The representative of Turkey, speaking in exercise of the right of reply in response to references to Cyprus in the statements delivered by the European Union and the United Kingdom on 'L.27', said that only a negotiated settlement based on dialogue can produce a sustainable solution. She called on all parties to contribute to efforts to that end without bias or prejudice.

The representative of Azerbaijan, responding to a statement delivered by his counterpart from Armenia, said blaming a single country for alleged misuse of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation's platform calls into question the sovereign right of Member States to independently make decisions.

The representative of Cyprus, responding to her counterpart from Turkey, said that Member States should address each other by their proper names. Turkey's statement demonstrated how and why references to Cyprus in documents of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation contradict relevant United Nations resolutions. That State is using the Turkish Cypriot community as a pretence for the strategic objective of partition. Noting that the United Nations has set peaceful parameters for resolving the issue, she called on Turkey to respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Cyprus.

The representative of Armenia rejected the 'repetitive narrative' distorting the root causes of the settlement of Nagorno-Karabakh. Azerbaijan's military aggression, aided by Turkey and foreign mercenaries, undermines negotiations for a peaceful resolution of the conflict, he said, expressing appreciation for the international community's support on this matter.

The representative of Azerbaijan said his delegation did not need to respond to the hackneyed statements of his counterpart from Armenia, which are distorted and full of misinterpretations.