PGA Tour Inc.

09/20/2020 | News release | Distributed by Public on 09/20/2020 17:42

Matthew Wolff comes up short in first U.S. Open

MAMARONECK, N.Y. - The kid will live to fight another day.

Matthew Wolff, the 54-hole leader by two, just didn't have it for the final round of the 120th U.S. Open at Winged Foot on Sunday. He shot a final-round 75 to finish even par and in solo second, six behind Bryson DeChambeau (67), who shot the low round of the day by three.

'I played really tough all week,' Wolff said. 'I battled hard. Things just didn't go my way. But first U.S. Open, second place is something to be proud of and hold your head up high for.'

Wolff blinked first when he hit a wild hook and bogeyed the third hole. DeChambeau caught him with a birdie at the fourth hole, and took a lead he would never relinquish with a par at the fifth. Both eagled the par-5 ninth to remain separated by just one shot, but it was no contest from there as DeChambeau kept the pedal down while Wolff shot a 39 coming in.

'My advice?' said Zach Johnson (74, T8) 'Leave this parking lot with the positives because, my guess, there's a slew of them. Whatever he's doing right now is not ineffective.

'… He's going to slice and dice today,' Johnson added, 'and he needs to really focus in on some of the things that he did the previous three days, I think more so than today.'

The two main combatants have a history of butting heads. When Wolff won the 3M Open last year, DeChambeau tied for second. When DeChambeau won the Rocket Mortgage Classic in July, Wolff was second. Both tied for fourth at the PGA Championship last month.

DeChambeau said he expects to run into Wolff again in the future, and it seems likely. Wolff is too good to just go away, and he's also irrepressible, approaching golf as a game, not science. While DeChambeau had ear buds in prior to the final round, Wolff was on the phone cracking up laughing. Although he said he would play his usual 'rip dog' game, he was just a little off.

'I really didn't feel that nervous out there,' he said. 'Maybe at the start I did, but at the start I played pretty well. I don't think it was nerves that were holding me back. I just think it wasn't meant to be.' A few breaks here and there, he said, and he might have made it closer.

The final pairing further accelerated a youth movement that was already in gear. Wolff (21) and DeChambeau (27) combined to make up the second youngest final pairing in the last 50 majors, behind only Jordan Spieth (22) and Smylie Kaufman (24) at the 2016 Masters Tournament.

Wolff's youthful exuberance will almost certainly come away from Winged Foot unscathed.

'He's just a kid,' said fellow Oklahoma State product Rickie Fowler (79, 17 over). 'Some of the things he'll say, you sometimes forget that you're around someone who's - you look at him as one of our peers, someone you play against and compete against, but he'll say something and you're like, yeah, he's still a kid. He's 10 years behind us.

'There's really no course that doesn't suit him,' Fowler added, 'just because he's able to work the ball both ways easily. He's a great ball-striker. His extra length, with the way the rough is, it helps on a lot of holes out here because you're going to miss fairways, and to potentially have between two and four clubs less out of the rough, that makes a big difference.'

That's the case on any course, and Wolff will almost certainly be a force on many of them.