The University of Toledo

12/09/2019 | News release | Distributed by Public on 12/09/2019 03:07

Families Set to Celebrate Commencement Dec. 14

More than 2,000 students at The University of Toledo will graduate at commencement ceremonies Saturday, Dec. 14, in Savage Arena.

The University is holding two ceremonies to include both undergraduate and graduate students from each of the colleges.

A total of 2,070 degrees will be awarded: 1,474 bachelor's degrees, 426 master's degrees, 104 doctoral degrees, 41 associate's degrees, 15 education specialist degrees and 10 graduate certificates.

The 9 a.m. ceremony will recognize all Ph.D. candidates and graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters; Engineering; Judith Herb College of Education; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

The 1 p.m. ceremony will recognize undergraduate and graduate students receiving degrees from the colleges of Business and Innovation; Health and Human Services; Nursing; University College; and Medicine and Life Sciences.

Commencement is always a time to celebrate with family. Their support is critical to achieving success. For several students walking across the stage this year, family was literally at their side for the journey.

Lori and Jordan Boyer in 2001 and 2019


At 48 years old, Lori Boyer is set to take the stage and grasp her diploma on the same day as her son, Jordan.

Lori, a preschool teacher, started taking classes at UToledo in 1990, but stopped to raise her three children.

After returning in January to cross the finish line, the UToledo employee at the Early Learning Center is graduating from University College with a bachelor's degree in an individualized program of early childhood education and educational leadership. Her son is graduating from the College of Engineering with a bachelor's degree in computer science and engineering technology.

'I am proud to share this special moment with my oldest son,' Boyer said. 'It's important to me to prove to all of my children that you can accomplish anything no matter what point you are in life. I accomplished something I set out to do a long time ago, and it has the potential to take me in different directions in my career.'

Fall commencement also is a family affair for a brother-and-sister duo who worked side by side as undergraduates in the same exercise biology research lab.

Nicole and Dylan Sarieh

Dylan and Nicole Sarieh, two-thirds of a set of fraternal triplets, both chose to study exercise science as pre-med students in the College of Health and Human Services, while their brother studies business at UToledo.

Together, Dylan and Nicole researched the molecular regulation of skeletal muscle growth under the guidance of Dr. Thomas McLoughlin, associate professor in the School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, in order to help clinicians develop ways to help patients grow stronger after suffering from muscle loss.

'The opportunity to do real, meaningful, hands-on work in the lab definitely built our confidence and opened our eyes to what is important,' Dylan said about his undergraduate research experience. 'My sister and I both plan to next go to medical school. She wants to be a dermatologist, and I want to be a general physician.'

'Whether at home, in the classroom or in the lab, I always had someone I could lean on who was tackling the same challenges,' Nicole said. 'Putting our two brains together - even during car rides - made a big difference in our success.'

For some graduates, they found love and are starting their own family.

McKenna Wirebaugh completed a co-op at the BP Whiting Refinery in Whiting, Ind. This photo shows Lake Michigan and the Chicago skyline.

McKenna Wirebaugh, who is graduating with a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering, met her soon-to-be husband at UToledo. Both she and Travis Mang, her fiancé, will receive degrees Saturday.

Turns out, planning their upcoming wedding is the only item left on the to-do list. Wirebaugh secured a full-time job as a process engineer at BP's Cherry Point Refinery in Blaine, Wash., located about 40 minutes south of Vancouver. She is scheduled to start her new job in March, about a month after her honeymoon.

'I chose to go to UToledo because of the mandatory co-op program in engineering,' Wirebaugh said. 'It guaranteed I would have a paycheck while in school and build my resumé. I'm grateful for my decision because it ended up launching my career.'

Wirebaugh completed four co-op rotations with BP while at UToledo. She also helped build a water purification unit that was sent to Ecuador through the nonprofit organization Clean Water for the World.

Her favorite experience as a student in the Jesup Scott Honors College was a class focusing on creativity. For a group project on the dangers of cell-phone use, they brought in a PlayStation 2 system and challenged students to text and drive on Mario Kart without crashing.

'My professors have truly cared about me inside and outside of my academic career,' Wirebaugh said. 'I don't see the friendships I've made here ending anytime soon.'

In the event of inclement weather, the approximately two-hour commencement ceremonies will be moved to Sunday, Dec. 15.

For those unable to attend, the ceremonies will stream live at video.utoledo.edu.

For more information, go to the UToledo commencement website.

This entry was posted on Monday, December 9th, 2019 at 4:47 am and is filed under Alumni, Arts and Letters, Business and Innovation, Engineering, Events, Graduate Studies, Health and Human Services, Honors, Medicine and Life Sciences, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, News, Nursing, Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, UToday, - Judith Herb College of Education .
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