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Partnership for a New American Economy

06/20/2019 | Press release | Distributed by Public on 06/20/2019 08:10

New data shows the number of immigrant entrepreneurs in Baltimore grew by 18 percent in one year

New York - Today New American Economy (NAE), a bipartisan research and advocacy organization focused on immigration, released new data highlighting the significant contributions immigrants make to Baltimore's community and economy. The data shows that immigrants in Baltimore are crucial job creators - the area's immigrant entrepreneur population grew more than 18 percent in just one year. Immigrants are also major consumers who help power Baltimore's businesses. In 2017, Baltimore's immigrants held nearly $8.7 billion in spending power, a $400 million increase from 2016.

The research is part of NAE's Map the Impact, an interactive map that quantifies immigrant contributions at the national, state, metro area, and congressional district levels, and across industries.

Key findings for the Baltimore metro area include:

  • Immigrants are driving Baltimore's small business economy. In 2017, there were 23,885 immigrant entrepreneurs in Baltimore, a more than 18 percent increase from 2016. Immigrants are also 57 percent more likely to be entrepreneurs when compared to U.S.-born residents.
  • Half of Baltimore's immigrants has a bachelor's degree. In 2017, 23.8 percent of Baltimore immigrants had earned a bachelor's degree, and an additional 24 percent had earned a graduate degree, providing them with increased earning potential and potential for upward mobility.
  • Immigrants help fill workforce gaps. In 2017, more than 80 percent of immigrants in Baltimore were of working age, compared to 63.7 percent of U.S.-born residents, and helped to fill employment gaps across industries.
  • Immigrants pay billions in taxes and hold significant spending power. In 2017, immigrants in Baltimore paid more than $3.4 billion in federal, state, and local taxes and held nearly $8.7 billion in spending power, supporting Baltimore's local businesses.

'As Baltimore continues to grow, the local small business sector will be critical to this economic prosperity,' said Kate Brick, Director of State and Local Initiatives at New American Economy. 'Immigrants will continue to play an outsized role in this growth as they start new businesses and support the local economy through consumer spending.'

Map the Impact shows NAE analysis of the latest data from the 2017 American Communities Survey. You can find the new version of the Map at maptheimpact.org.