NASA - The National Aeronautics and Space Administration

07/12/2020 | News release | Distributed by Public on 07/12/2020 08:58

Fay - Atlantic Ocean

July 12, 2020 - NASA Tracks Fay's Remnants into Eastern Canada

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed that Post-Tropical Cyclone Fay had moved into eastern Canada by July 11.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Post-Tropical Storm Fay on July 11 at 1:30 p.m. EDT that showed the system had moved into eastern Canada.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite was used to create a time lapse of the movement of Tropical Storm Fay from July 9 to 11. The animation showed Fay had moved through upstate New York and into eastern Canada. The animation was created using NASA Worldview.

NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible time lapse of the movement of Tropical Storm Fay movement from July 9 to July 11. The animation showed Fay had moved through upstate New York and into eastern Canada. Credit: NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Worldview

The National Hurricane Center noted that Fay's remnants are still expected to be over Canada today, July 12. By 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC), the NHC expects the center of Fay to be near 52.5 degrees north latitude and 67.0 degrees west longitude, with maximum sustained winds near 20 knots (23 mph/37 kph) and diminishing. Fay's remnants are expected to dissipate by 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) on July 13.

NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Worldview application provides the capability to interactively browse over 700 global, full-resolution satellite imagery layers and then download the underlying data. Many of the available imagery layers are updated within three hours of observation, essentially showing the entire Earth as it looks 'right now.'

NASA's Terra satellite is one in a fleet of NASA satellites that provide data for hurricane research.

Tropical cyclones/hurricanes are the most powerful weather events on Earth. NASA's expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

By Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center