Results

Nutra Pharma Corporation

09/24/2021 | Press release | Distributed by Public on 09/24/2021 09:42

Quarterly Report (SEC Filing - 10-Q)

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2021
TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT

For the transition period from _________ to ________

Commission file numbers 000-32141

NUTRA PHARMA CORP.

(Name of registrant as specified in its charter)

California 91-2021600

(State or Other

Jurisdiction of Organization)

(IRS Employer

Identification Number)

1537 NW 65th Avenue

Plantation, FL

33313
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
(954) 509-0911

(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class Ticker symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
N/A N/A N/A

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☐ No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☐ No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.

Large accelerated filer ☐ Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
Emerging Growth Company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the Registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No

As of September 24, 2021, there were 7,277,619,714shares of common stock and 3,000,000 shares of Series A preferred stock issued and outstanding.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION F-1
Item 1. Financial Statements F-1
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2021 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2020 F-1
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 (Unaudited) F-2
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Deficit for the Three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 (Unaudited) F-3
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Deficit for the Six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 (Unaudited) F-4
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 (Unaudited) F-5
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) F-6
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 4
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk 13
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 13
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION 14
Item 1. Legal Proceedings 14
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 15
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities 16
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosure 16
Item 5. Other Information 16
Item 6. Exhibits 16
2

Nutra Pharma Corp ("Nutra Pharma") and its wholly owned subsidiaries, ReceptoPharm, Inc. ("ReceptoPharm") and Designer Diagnostics Inc. are referred to herein as "we", "our" or "us" (ReceptoPharm is also individually referred to herein).

Forward Looking Statements

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ending June 30, 2021, contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, as well as assumptions that if they never materialize or prove incorrect, could cause our results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. The words or phrases "would be," "will allow, "intends to," "will likely result," "are expected to," "will continue," "is anticipated," "estimate," "project," or similar expressions are intended to identify "forward-looking statements." We are subject to risks detailed in Item 1(a). All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements, including: (a) any projections of revenue, gross margin, expenses, earnings or losses from operations, synergies or other financial items; and (b) any statements of the plans, strategies and objectives of management for future operations; and (c) any statement concerning developments, plans, or performance. Unless otherwise required by applicable law, we do not undertake and we specifically disclaim any obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect occurrences, developments, unanticipated events or circumstances after the date of such statement.

3

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements

NUTRA PHARMA CORP.

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

June 30, December 31,
2021 2020
(Unaudited)
ASSETS
Current assets:
Cash $ 50,480 $ -
Accounts receivable 37,886 37,080
Inventory, current portion 34,003 5,271
Other receivable 3,000 3,000
Convertible notes receivable 158,215 -
Prepaid expenses and other current assets 80,205 10,000
Total current assets 363,789 55,351
Inventory, less current portion 98,880 78,880
Property and equipment, net 41,521 14,742
Operating lease right-of-use assets 136,651 144,010
Security deposit 8,803 8,803
Total assets $ 649,644 $ 301,786
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable $ 538,468 $ 599,428
Accrued expenses 775,794 780,432
Accrued payroll due to officers 1,506,693 1,429,693
Accrued interest to related parties 148,899 179,522
Due to officer 192,378 200,837
Derivative liabilities 27,049,924 3,567,176
Other debt, net of discount, current portion 8,373,894 4,631,921
SBA notes payable, current portion 66,357 10,725
Operating lease obligations, current portion 73,632 82,873
Total current liabilities 38,726,039 11,482,607
Convertible note, less current portion 979,654 48,477
SBA notes payable, less current portion 148,438 204,070
Operating lease obligations, less current portion 39,611 60,447
Total liabilities 39,893,742 11,795,601
Commitments and Contingencies
Stockholders' deficit:
Preferred stock, $0.001par value, 20,000,000shares authorized: 3,000,000Series A Preferred shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 3,000 3,000
Common stock, $0.001par value, 8,000,000,000shares authorized: 7,267,619,714and 6,955,197,214shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 7,267,620 6,955,197
Additional paid-in capital 52,816,687 50,181,456
Accumulated deficit (99,331,405 ) (68,633,468 )
Total stockholders' deficit (39,244,098 ) (11,493,815 )
Total liabilities and stockholders' deficit $ 649,644 $ 301,786

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

F-1

NUTRA PHARMA CORP.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

For the Three Months Ended June 30,

For the Six Months Ended

June 30,

2021 2020 2021 2020
Net sales $ 30,459 $ 6,240 $ 52,482 $ 23,356
Cost of sales (9,006 ) (3,685 ) (14,640 ) (8,964 )
Gross profit 21,453 2,555 37,842 14,392
Operating expenses:
Selling, general and administrative - including stock based compensation of $1,445and $1,000for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, and $1,445and $8,500for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively 440,165 232,427 944,757 470,868
Bad debt expense (recovery) -related party 20,000 (31,000 ) 73,000 (70,500 )
Total operating expenses 460,165 201,427 1,017,757 400,368
Loss from operations (438,712 ) (198,872 ) (979,915 ) (385,976 )
Other income (expenses)
Other income 1,715 5,000 1,715 5,000
Interest expense (103,970 ) (78,238 ) (215,310 ) (147,111 )
Interest expense to related parties (4,432 ) (4,914 ) (9,377 ) (9,635 )
Change in fair value of convertible notes and derivatives 3,918,817 (1,226,465 ) (28,958,053 ) 1,316,477
Stock issued for loan modification - (3,000 ) (107,500 ) (80,200 )
Loss on settlement of debt and accrued expense, net (11,200 ) - (429,497 ) (22,000 )
Total other income (expenses) 3,800,930 (1,307,617 ) (29,718,022 ) 1,062,531
Loss before income taxes 3,362,218 (1,506,489 ) (30,697,937 ) 676,555
Provision for income taxes - - - -
Net income (loss) $ 3,362,218 $ (1,506,489 ) $ (30,697,937 ) $ 676,555
Net income (loss) per share - basic and diluted $ 0.00 $ (0.00 ) $ (0.00 ) $ 0.00
Weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period - basic 7,248,545,868 6,623,845,012 7,156,417,062 6,448,086,770
Weighted average number of shares outstanding during the period - diluted 11,761,879,558 6,623,845,012 7,156,417,062 12,971,980,061

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

F-2

NUTRA PHARMA CORP.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Deficit

For the Three Months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020

(Unaudited)

Additional Total
Preferred Stock Common Stock Paid-in Accumulated Stockholder'
Shares Amount Shares Amount Capital Deficit Deficit
Balance -March 31, 2021 3,000,000 $ 3,000 7,225,349,714 $ 7,225,350 $ 52,566,971 $ (102,693,623 ) $ (42,898,303 )
Issuance of common stock in exchange for services to consultants - - 5,000,000 5,000 28,000 - 33,000
Common stock issued for conversion of debt - - 35,270,000 35,270 208,517 - 243,787
Common stock issued for settlement of debt - - 2,000,000 2,000 13,199 - 15,200
Net income 3,362,218 3,362,218
Balance -June 30, 2021 3,000,000 $ 3,000 7,267,619,714 $ 7,267,620 $ 52,816,687 $ (99,331,405 ) $ (39,244,098 )
Additional Total
Preferred Stock Common Stock Paid-in Accumulated Stockholder'
Shares Amount Shares Amount Capital Deficit Deficit
Balance -March 31, 2020 3,000,000 $ 3,000 6,622,746,111 $ 6,622,746 $ 50,127,203 $ (65,681,240 ) $ (8,928,291 )
Common stock issued for debt modification and penalty - - 5,000,000 5,000 (2,000 ) - 3,000
Net loss (1,506,489 ) (1,506,489 )
Balance -June 30, 2020 3,000,000 $ 3,000 6,627,746,111 $ 6,627,746 $ 50,125,203 $ (67,187,729 ) $ (10,431,780 )

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

F-3

NUTRA PHARMA CORP.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders' Deficit

For the Six Months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020

(Unaudited)

Additional Total
Preferred Stock Common Stock Paid-in Accumulated Stockholder'
Shares Amount Shares Amount Capital Deficit Deficit
Balance -December 31, 2020 3,000,000 $ 3,000 6,955,197,214 $ 6,955,197 $ 50,181,456 $ (68,633,468 ) $ (11,493,815 )
Issuance of common stock in exchange for services to consultants - - 5,000,000 5,000 28,000 - 33,000
Common stock issued for debt modification and penalty - - 25,000,000 25,000 82,500 - 107,500
Common stock issued for conversion of debt - - 240,350,000 240,350 2,104,049 - 2,344,399
Common stock issued for settlement of debt - - 42,072,500 42,073 420,682 - 462,755
Net loss (30,697,937 ) (30,697,937 )
Balance -June 30, 2021 3,000,000 $ 3,000 7,267,619,714 $ 7,267,620 $ 52,816,687 $ (99,331,405 ) $ (39,244,098 )
Additional Total
Preferred Stock Common Stock Paid-in Accumulated Stockholder'
Shares Amount Shares Amount Capital Deficit Deficit
Balance -December 31, 2019 3,000,000 $ 3,000 5,876,746,111 $ 5,876,746 $ 50,283,503 $ (67,864,284 ) $ (11,701,035 )
Common stock issued for debt modification and penalty - - 126,000,000 126,000 (45,800 ) - 80,200
Common stock issued for conversion of debt - - 500,000,000 500,000 (75,000 ) - 425,000
Common stock issued for settlement of debt - - 125,000,000 125,000 (37,500 ) - 87,500
Net income 676,555 676,555
Balance -June 30, 2020 3,000,000 $ 3,000 6,627,746,111 $ 6,627,746 $ 50,125,203 $ (67,187,729 ) $ (10,431,780 )

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

F-4

NUTRA PHARMA CORP.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

For the Six Months Ended June 30,
2021 2020
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net (loss) income $ (30,697,937 ) $ 676,555
Adjustments to reconcile net (loss) income to net cash used in operating activities:
Bad debt expense (recovery) - related party 73,000 (70,500 )
Accrued interest expense for amount due to officer 3,891 3,654
Loss on settlement of debt and accrued expense 429,497 22,000
Depreciation 3,385 1,424
Stock-based compensation 1,445 8,500
Stock-based loan modification cost 107,500 80,200
Amortization of convertible notes receivable discount (1,715 ) -
Change in fair value of convertible notes and derivatives 28,958,053 (1,316,477 )
Amortization of loan discount 137,881 58,829
Amortization of operating lease right-of-use assets 11,461 39,296
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Increase in accounts receivable (807 ) (1,581 )
Increase in other receivable (6,000 ) -
Increase in inventory (48,732 ) (11,584 )
Decrease (increase) in prepaid expenses and other current assets (38,650 ) 132
Decrease in accounts payable (60,960 ) (39,827 )
Increase in accrued expenses 18,621 97,458
Increase in accrued payroll due to officers 77,000 89,300
Increase (decrease) in accrued interest to related parties (30,623 ) 9,635
Decrease in operating lease obligations (34,179 ) (35,223 )
Net cash used in operating activities (1,097,869 ) (388,209 )
Cash flows from investing activities:
Convertible notes receivable advances (150,500 ) -
Acquisition of equipment (30,164 ) -
Net cash used in investing activities: (180,664 ) -
Cash flows from financing activities:
Loans from officer 21,900 152,700
Repayment of officer loans (107,250 ) (15,450 )
Repayments of notes payable-related party - (14,400 )
Proceeds from convertible notes 1,492,560 111,875
Repayment of convertible notes (62,822 ) -
Advances from an unrelated third party - 50,000
Repayments of other notes payable (15,375 ) (53,441 )
Proceeds from SBA notes payable - 214,795
Net cash provided by financing activities 1,329,013 446,079
Net increase in cash 50,480 57,870
Cash - beginning of period - -
Cash - end of period $ 50,480 $ 57,870
Supplemental Cash Flow Information:
Cash paid for interest $ 40,000 $ -
Cash paid for income taxes $ - $ -
Non Cash Financing and Investing:
Stocks issued in settlement of notes and accrued expenses $ 462,756 $ 87,500
Shares issued for conversion of debt $ 2,344,399 $ 425,000
Increase of right-of-use asset due to lease renewal $ 4,102 $ -
Increase of operating lease liabilities due to lease renewal $ 4,102 $ -
Reclassification of accrued interest to debt $ - $ 12,150
Reclassification of rental receivable to convertible notes receivable $ 6,000 $ -

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

F-5

NUTRA PHARMA CORP.

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

June 30, 2021

1. BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Organization

Nutra Pharma Corp. ("Nutra Pharma"), is a holding company that owns intellectual property and operates in the biotechnology industry. Nutra Pharma was incorporated under the laws of the state of California on February 1, 2000, under the original name of Exotic-Bird.com.

Through its wholly-owned subsidiary, ReceptoPharm, Inc. ("ReceptoPharm"), Nutra Pharma conducts drug discovery research and development activities. In October 2009, Nutra Pharma launched its first consumer product called Cobroxin®, an over-the-counter pain reliever designed to treat moderate to severe chronic pain. In May 2010, Nutra Pharma launched its second consumer product called Nyloxin®, an over-the-counter pain reliever that is a stronger version of Cobroxin® and is designed to treat severe chronic pain. In December 2014, Nutra Pharma launched Pet Pain-Away, an over-the-counter pain reliever designed to treat pain in cats and dogs. In October 2019, Nutra Pharma launched Equine Pain-Away™, an over-the-counter topical pain reliever designed to treat pain and inflammation in horses. In March 2021, Nutra Pharma launched Luxury Feet™, an over-the-counter pain reliever designed specifically to treat foot pain and inflammation especially for women that wear high heels and stilettos.

Basis of Presentation and Consolidation

The Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and notes are presented in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and do not contain certain information included in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020. In the opinion of management, all adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included and are of a normal, recurring nature. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of results for a full year. Therefore, the interim Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto contained in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K.

The accompanying Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements include the results of Nutra Pharma and its wholly-owned subsidiaries Designer Diagnostics Inc. and ReceptoPharm (collectively "the Company", "us", "we" or "our"). We operate as one reportable segment. Designer Diagnostics Inc. has been inactive since June 2011. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.

Reclassification of Prior Year Presentation

Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified for consistency with the current year presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on the reported results of operations.

Liquidity and Going Concern

Our Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are presented on a going concern basis, which contemplate the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. We have experienced recurring, significant losses from operations, and have an accumulated deficit of $99,331,405at June 30, 2021. In addition, we have a significant amount of indebtedness in default, a working capital deficit of $38,362,250and a stockholders' deficit of $39,244,098at June 30, 2021.

There is substantial doubt regarding our ability to continue as a going concern which is contingent upon our ability to secure additional financing, increase ownership equity and attain profitable operations. In addition, our ability to continue as a going concern must be considered in light of the problems, expenses and complications frequently encountered in established markets and the competitive environment in which we operate.

We do not have sufficient cash to sustain our operations for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report and will require additional financing in order to execute our operating plan and continue as a going concern. Since our sales are not currently adequate to fund our operations, we continue to rely principally on debt and equity funding; however, proceeds from such funding have not been sufficient to execute our business plan. Our plan is to attempt to secure adequate funding until sales of our pain products are adequate to fund our operations. We cannot predict whether additional financing will be available, and/or whether any such funding will be in the form of equity, debt, or another form. In the event that these financing sources do not materialize, or if we are unsuccessful in increasing our revenues and profits, we will be unable to implement our current plans for expansion, repay our obligations as they become due and continue as a going concern.

The accompanying Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

F-6

Impact of COVID-19 on our Operations

The ramifications of the outbreak of the novel strain of COVID-19 are filled with uncertainty and changing quickly. Our operations have continued during the COVID-19 pandemic and we have not had significant disruption. Beginning in June 2020, the Company experienced a delay in retail rollout as a downstream implication of the slowing economy. We also closed our Coral Springs office in effort to save money. During May 2020, we received approval from the Small Business Administration ("SBA") to fund our request for a PPP loan for $64,895. We used the proceeds primarily for payroll costs. We expect forgiveness of this loan under the current terms of requirement by the SBA. During April and June 2020, we obtained a loan in the amount of $150,000from SBA under its Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance program. We used the proceeds primarily for rent, payroll, utilities, accounting and legal expenses (See Note 6).

The Company is operating in a rapidly changing environment so the extent to which COVID-19 impacts its business, operations and financial results from this point forward will depend on numerous evolving factors that the Company cannot accurately predict. Those factors include the following: the duration and scope of the pandemic; governmental, business and individuals' actions that have been and continue to be taken in response to the pandemic; and the distribution of testing and a vaccine.

Use of Estimates

The accompanying Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America which require management to make estimates and assumptions. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expense. Significant estimates include our ability to continue as going concern, the recoverability of inventories and long-lived assets, the recoverability of amounts due from officer, the valuation of stock-based compensation and certain debt and derivative liabilities, recognition of loss contingencies and deferred tax valuation allowances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Changes in facts and circumstances may result in revised estimates, which would be recorded in the period in which they become known.

Revenue from Contracts with Customers

The Company accounts for revenue from contracts with customers in accordance with Financial Accounting Standard Board ("FASB") Accounting Standard Codification ("ASC") Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers ("ASC 606"). Under ASC Topic 606, revenue recognition has a five-step process: a) Determine whether a contract exists; b) Identify the performance obligations; c) Determine the transaction price; d) Allocate the transaction price; and e) Recognize revenue when (or as) performance obligations are satisfied.

Our revenues are primarily derived from customer orders for the purchase of our products. We recognize revenues as performance obligations are fulfilled upon shipment of products. We record revenues net of promotions and discounts. For certain product sales to a distributor, we record revenue including a portion of the cash proceeds that is remitted back to the distributor.

F-7

Accounting for Shipping and Handling Costs

We account for shipping and handling as fulfillment activities and record amounts billed to customers as revenue and the related shipping and handling costs as cost of sales.

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

We grant credit without collateral to our customers based on our evaluation of a particular customer's credit worthiness. Accounts receivable are due 30 days after the issuance of the invoice. In addition, allowances for doubtful accounts are maintained for potential credit losses based on the age of the accounts receivable and the results of periodic credit evaluations of our customers' financial condition. Accounts receivable are written off after collection efforts have been deemed to be unsuccessful. Accounts written off as uncollectible are deducted from the allowance for doubtful accounts, while subsequent recoveries are netted against the provision for doubtful accounts expense. We generally do not charge interest on accounts receivable. We use third party payment processors and are required to maintain reserve balances, which are included in accounts receivable.

Accounts receivable are stated at estimated net realizable value. Accounts receivable are comprised of balances due from customers net of estimated allowances for uncollectible accounts. Noallowance for doubtful account is deemed to be required at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

Inventories

Inventories, which are stated at the lower of average cost or net realizable value, consist of packaging materials, finished products, and raw venom that is utilized to make the API (active pharmaceutical ingredient). The raw unprocessed venom has an indefinite life for use. We classify inventory as short-term or long-term inventory based on timing of when it is expected to be consumed. The Company regularly reviews inventory quantities on hand. If necessary, it records a net realizable value adjustment for excess and obsolete inventory based primarily on its estimates of product demand and production requirements. Write-downs are charged to cost of goods sold. We performed an evaluation of our inventory and related accounts at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and increased the reserve on supplier advances for future venom purchases included in prepaid expenses and other current assets by $0and $21,303, respectively. At both June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the total valuation allowance for prepaid venom was $246,162.

Financial Instruments and Concentration of Credit Risk

Our financial instruments include cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued expenses, loans payable, due to officers and derivative financial instruments. Other than certain warrant and convertible instruments (derivative financial instruments) and liabilities to related parties (for which it was impracticable to estimate fair value due to uncertainty as to when they will be satisfied and a lack of similar type transactions in the marketplace), we believe the carrying values of our financial instruments approximate their fair values because they are short term in nature or payable on demand. Our derivative financial instruments are carried at a measured fair value.

Balances in various cash accounts may at times exceed federally insured limits. We have not experienced any losses in such accounts. We do not hold or issue financial instruments for trading purposes. In addition, for the three months ended June 30, 2021, there was one customer accounted for 31% of the total revenues. For the three months ended June 30, 2020, there was no customer accounted for more than 10% of the total revenues. For the six months ended June 30, 2021, there was one customer that accounted for 33% of the total revenues. For the six months ended June 30, 2020, there was one customer that accounted for 43% of the total revenues. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, 98.5% and 100% of the accounts receivable balance are reserves due from two payment processors.

F-8

Operating Lease Right-of-Use Asset and Liability

The Company accounts for leases in accordance with Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), as amended ("ASC Topic 842"). This standard establishes a right-of-use (ROU) model that requires a lessee to record a ROU asset and a lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than 12 months and classify as either operating or finance leases.

In accordance with ASC Topic 842, at the inception of an arrangement, the Company determines whether the arrangement is or contains a lease based on the unique facts and circumstances present and the classification of the lease including whether the contract involves the use of a distinct identified asset, whether we obtain the right to substantially all the economic benefit from the use of the asset, and whether we have the right to direct the use of the asset. Leases with a term greater than one year are recognized on the balance sheet as ROU assets, lease liabilities and, if applicable, long-term lease liabilities. The Company has elected not to recognize on the balance sheet leases with terms of one year or less under practical expedient in paragraph ASC 842-20-25-2.

Lease liabilities and their corresponding ROU assets are recorded based on the present value of lease payments over the expected lease term. The implicit rate within our operating leases are generally not determinable and, therefore, the Company uses the incremental borrowing rate at the lease commencement date to determine the present value of lease payments. The determination of the Company's incremental borrowing rate requires judgment. The Company determines the incremental borrowing rate for each lease using our estimated borrowing rate.

Derivative Financial Instruments

Management evaluates all of its financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported as charges or credits to income. For option-based simple derivative financial instruments, the Company uses the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to value the derivative instruments at inception and subsequent valuation dates. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

We do not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market, or foreign currency risks.

Convertible Debt

For convertible debt that does not contain an embedded derivative that requires bifurcation, the conversion feature is evaluated to determine if the rate of conversion is below market value and should be categorized as a beneficial conversion feature ("BCF"). A BCF related to debt is recorded by the Company as a debt discount and with the offset recorded to equity. The related convertible debt is recorded net of the discount for the BCF. The discount is amortized as additional interest expense over the term of the debt with the resulting debt discount being accreted over the term of the note.

F-9

The Fair Value Measurement Option

We have elected the fair value measurement option for convertible debt with embedded derivatives that require bifurcation, and record the entire hybrid financing instrument at fair value under the guidance of ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging ("ASC Topic 815"). The Company reports interest expense, including accrued interest, related to this convertible debt under the fair value option, within the change in fair value of convertible notes and derivatives in the accompanying consolidated statement of operations.

Derivative Accounting for Convertible Debt and Options and Warrants

The Company evaluated the terms and conditions of the convertible debt under the guidance of ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging. The conversion terms of some of the convertible notes are variable based on certain factors, such as the future price of the Company's common stock. The number of shares of common stock to be issued is based on the future price of the Company's common stock. The number of shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of the debt is indeterminate. Due to the fact that the number of shares of common stock issuable could exceed the Company's authorized share limit, the equity environment is tainted, and all additional convertible debt and options and warrants are included in the value of the derivative liabilities. Pursuant to ASC 815-15, Embedded Derivatives, the fair values of the convertible debt, options and warrants and shares to be issued were recorded as derivative liabilities on the issuance date and revalued at each reporting period.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. Expenditures for major improvements and additions are added to property and equipment, while replacements, maintenance and repairs which do not extend the useful lives are expensed. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets of 3- 7 years.

Long-Lived Assets

The carrying value of long-lived assets is reviewed annually and on a regular basis for the existence of facts and circumstances that may suggest impairment. If indicators of impairment are present, we determine whether the sum of the estimated undiscounted future cash flows attributable to the long-lived asset in question is less than its carrying amount. If less, we measure the amount of the impairment based on the amount that the carrying value of the impaired asset exceeds the discounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposal of the impaired assets.

Income Taxes

The Company recorded noincome tax expense for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 because the estimated annual effective tax rate was zero. As of June 30, 2021, the Company continues to provide a valuation allowance against its net deferred tax assets since the Company believes it is more likely than not that its deferred tax assets will not be realized.

The Company adopted ASU No. 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes ("ASU 2019-12") effective as of January 1, 2021. The standard is intended to simplify various aspects related to accounting for income taxes. ASU 2019-12 removes certain exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 and also clarifies and amends existing guidance to improve consistent application. The new standard did not have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

Stock-Based Compensation

We account for stock-based compensation in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718, Stock Compensation ("ASC Topic 718"). ASC Topic 718, which requires that the cost resulting from all share-based transactions be recorded in the financial statements over the respective service periods. It establishes fair value as the measurement objective in accounting for share-based payment arrangements and requires all entities to apply a fair-value-based measurement in accounting for share-based payment transactions with employees. The statement also establishes fair value as the measurement objective for transactions in which an entity acquires goods or services from non-employees in share-based payment transactions.

F-10

Net Income (Loss) Per Share

Net income (loss) per share is calculated in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 260, Earnings per Share. Basic income (loss) per share is calculated by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted income (loss) per share is calculated by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common shares and dilutive common stock equivalents outstanding. During periods in which we incur losses, common stock equivalents, if any, are not considered, as their effect would be anti-dilutive or have no effect on earnings per share. Any common shares issued as of a result of the exercise of conversion options and warrants would come from newly issued common shares from our remaining authorized shares.

Three Months Ended Six Months Ended
June 30, June 30,
2021 2020 2021 2020
Basic and diluted numerator:
Net income (loss) - basic $ 3,362,218 $ (1,506,489 ) $ (30,697,937 ) $ 676,555
Effect of dilutive securities:
Change in fair value of convertible notes (1,647,754 ) - - (1,818,618 )
Interest on convertible debt 58,330 - - 16,167
Net income (loss) - diluted $ 1,772,794 $ (1,506,489 ) $ (30,697,937 ) $ (1,125,896 )
Basic and diluted denominator:
Weighted-average common shares outstanding - basic 7,248,545,868 6,623,845,012 7,156,417,062 6,448,086,770
Effect of dilutive securities:
Convertible debt 4,513,333,690 - - 6,523,893,291
Weighted-average common shares outstanding - diluted (1) 11,761,879,558 6,623,845,012 7,156,417,062 12,971,980,061
Net income (loss) per share - basic and diluted $ 0.00 $ (0.00 ) $ (0.00 ) $ (0.00 )
(1) Includes potential common shares that are in excess of authorized shares.

For the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the following items were not included in the calculation of dilutive loss per share as the effect is anti-dilutive:

June 30, 2021 June 30, 2020
Options and warrants - 46,500,000
Convertible notes payable at fair value - 5,161,486,089
Convertible notes payable - 1,865,425,000
Total - 7,073,411,089

For the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the following items were not included in the calculation of dilutive loss per share as the effect is anti-dilutive:

June 30, 2021 June 30, 2020
Options and warrants 200,275,000 46,500,000
Convertible notes payable at fair value 774,465,232 -
Convertible notes payable 3,992,826,154 -
Total 4,967,566,386 46,500,000
F-11

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326) ("ASU 2016- 13"), which significantly changes how entities will account for credit losses for most financial assets and certain other instruments that are not measured at fair value through net income. ASU 2016-13 replaces the existing incurred loss model with an expected credit loss model that requires entities to estimate an expected lifetime credit loss on most financial assets and certain other instruments. Under ASU 2016-13 credit impairment is recognized as an allowance for credit losses, rather than as a direct write-down of the amortized cost basis of a financial asset. The impairment allowance is a valuation account deducted from the amortized cost basis of financial assets to present the net amount expected to be collected on the financial asset. Once the new pronouncement is adopted by the Company, the allowance for credit losses must be adjusted for management's current estimate at each reporting date. The new guidance provides no threshold for recognition of impairment allowance. Therefore, entities must also measure expected credit losses on assets that have a low risk of loss. For instance, trade receivables that are either current or not yet due may not require an allowance reserve under currently generally accepted accounting principles, but under the new standard, the Company will have to estimate an allowance for expected credit losses on trade receivables under ASU 2016-13. ASU 2016-13 is effective for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2022 for smaller reporting companies. Early adoption is permitted. The Company will evaluate the impact of ASU 2016-13 on the Company's consolidated financial statements in a future period closer to the date of adoption.

In August 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-06, Accounting for Convertible Instruments and Contracts in an Entity's Own Equity, which simplifies and clarifies certain calculation and presentation matters related to convertible and equity and debt instruments. Specifically, ASU-2020-06 removes requirements to separately account for conversion features as a derivative under ASC Topic 815 and removing the requirement to account for beneficial conversion features on such instruments. Accounting Standards Update 2020-06 also provides clearer guidance surrounding disclosure of such instruments and provides specific guidance for how such instruments are to be incorporated in the calculation of Diluted EPS. The guidance under ASU 2020-06 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, but no earlier than fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. The Company will adopt this standard using a modified retrospective approach effective January 1, 2022. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard, and does not believe that it will have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

In May 2021, the FASB issued ASU No. 2021-04, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Debt - Modifications and Extinguishments (Subtopic 470-50), Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718), and Derivatives and Hedging - Contracts in Entity's Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40): Issuer's Accounting for Certain Modification or Exchanges of Freestanding Equity-Classified Written Call Options ("ASU 2021-04"), which will clarify and reduce diversity in practice. Specifically, the new standard includes a recognition model comprising four categories of transactions and corresponding accounting treatment for each category. The category that would apply to a modification or an exchange of an equity-classified warrant would depend on the substance of the modification transaction (e.g. a financing transaction to raise equity versus one to raise debt). This recognition model is premised on the idea that the accounting for the transaction should not differ from what it would have been had the issuer of the warrants paid cash instead of modifying the warrants. ASU 2021-04 will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021 and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. This ASU will be applied prospectively to modifications or exchanges occurring on or after the effective date of the ASU. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this new guidance will have on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

All other newly issued accounting pronouncements but not yet effective have been deemed either immaterial or not applicable.

2. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

Certain assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are measured in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 820-10-05, Fair Value Measurements. FASB ASC Topic 820-10-05 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands the disclosure requirements regarding fair value measurements for financial assets and liabilities as well as for non-financial assets and liabilities that are recognized or disclosed at fair value on a recurring basis in the financial statements.

The statement requires fair value measurement be classified and disclosed in one of the following three categories:

Level 1: Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical unrestricted assets or liabilities;
Level 2: Quoted prices in markets that are not active or inputs which are observable either directly or indirectly for substantially the full term of the asset or liability; and
Level 3: Prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable (i.e. supported by little or no market activity).
F-12

The following table summarizes our financial instruments measured at fair value at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

Fair Value Measurements at June 30, 2021
Total Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Liabilities:
Warrant liability $ 1,096,554 $ - $ - $ 1,096,554
Derivative liabilities $ 25,953,370 $ - $ 25,953,370 $ -
Convertible notes at fair value $ 5,039,868 $ - $ - $ 5,039,868
Fair Value Measurements at December 31, 2020
Total Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
Liabilities:
Warrant liability $ 189,543 $ - $ - $ 189,543
Derivative liabilities $ 3,377,633 $ - $ 3,377,633 $ -
Convertible notes at fair value $ 1,832,439 $ - $ - $ 1,832,439

The following table shows the changes in fair value measurements for the warrant liability using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) during the six months ended June 30, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020:

Description

June 30,

2021

December 31, 2020
Beginning balance $ 189,543 $ 1,411
Purchases, issuances, and settlements - 143,369
Total loss included in earnings (1) 907,011 44,763
Ending balance $ 1,096,554 $ 189,543
(1) The gain related to the revaluation of our warrant liability is included in "Change in fair value of convertible notes and derivatives" in the accompanying consolidated statement of operations.

We valued our warrants using a Dilution-Adjusted Black-Scholes Model. Assumptions used include (1) 0.05% to 0.07% risk-free rate, (2) warrant life is the remaining contractual life of the warrants, (3) expected volatility of 240%, (4) zeroexpected dividends, (5) exercise price set forth in the agreements, (6) common stock price of the underlying share on the valuation date, and (7) number of shares to be issued if the instrument is converted.

We valued derivative liabilities using the number of potential convertible shares for warrants in equity and convertible notes with fixed conversion price that are recorded at amortized cost times the closing stock price of our restricted common stock at June 30, 2021. These derivative liabilities are recorded due to the fact that the number of shares of common stock issuable could exceed the Company's authorized share limit and the equity environment is tainted, and therefore all convertible debt and options and warrants should be accounted for as liabilities.

The following table summarizes assumptions and the significant terms of the convertible notes for which the entire hybrid instrument is recorded at fair value at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

Conversion Price - Lower of Fixed
Price or Percentage of VWAP
for Look-back Period
Debenture Face
Amount
Interest
Rate
Default
Interest
Rate
Discount
Rate
Anti-Dilution
Adjusted
Price
% of stock price for look-back period Look-back
Period
June 30, 2021 $ 722,446 8%-10%
Using the stated assumptions summarized in the table above, we calculated the inception date and reporting period fair values of each note issued. The following table shows the changes in fair value measurements for the convertible notes at fair value using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) during the six months ended June 30, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020:
20%-24% N/A $0.00050-$0.0037 50%-60% 3to 25Days
December 31, 2020 $ 766,101 8%-10% 20%-24% N/A $0.00050-$0.00064 50%-60% 3to 25Days


Description

June 30,

2021

December 31, 2020
Beginning balance $ 1,832,439 $ 5,814,047
Purchases and issuances 117,000 25,981
Day one loss on value of hybrid instrument (1) 1,973,612 318,174
Loss (gain) from change in fair value (1) 3,501,696 (1,931,927 )
Gain on settlement - (1,609,294 )
Debt discount - 22,344
Repayments in cash (40,480 ) (5,782 )
Conversion to common stock (2,344,399 ) (801,104 )
Ending balance $ 5,039,868 $ 1,832,439
(1) The losses (gains) related to the valuation of the convertible notes are included in "Change in fair value of convertible notes and derivatives" in the accompanying consolidated statement of operations.
F-13

3. INVENTORIES

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value on an average cost basis. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, inventories were as follows:

June 30,

2021

December 31,

2020

Raw Materials $ 130,151 $ 78,880
Finished Goods 2,732 5,271
Total Inventories 132,883 84,151
Less: Long-term inventory (98,880 ) (78,880 )
Current portion $ 34,003 $ 5,271

4. PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

Property and equipment consists of the following at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

June 30,

2021

December 31, 2020
Computer equipment $ 25,120 $ 25,120
Furniture and fixtures 34,757 34,757
Lab equipment 95,685 65,521
Telephone equipment 12,421 12,421
Office equipment - other 16,856 16,856
Leasehold improvements 73,168 73,168
Total 258,007 227,843
Less: Accumulated depreciation (216,486 ) (213,101 )
Property and equipment, net $ 41,521 $ 14,742

We review our long-lived assets for recoverability if events or changes in circumstances indicate the assets may be impaired. At June 30, 2021, we believe the carrying values of our long-lived assets are recoverable. Depreciation expense for the six-months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 was $3,385and $1,424, respectively, and for the three-months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 was $2,012and $712, respectively.

5. DUE TO/FROM OFFICER

At June 30, 2021, the balance due to our President and CEO, Rik Deitsch, is $192,378, which is an unsecured demand loan that bears interest at 4%. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we advanced $107,250to and collected $21,900from Mr. Deitsch and the companies owned by him. Additionally, accrued interest on the demand loan was $3,891and is included in the due to officer account. The Company has fully reserved receivables from companies owned by the Company's CEO. The reserve was $475,970as of June 30, 2021, which represents a full valuation allowance for amounts owed by these companies. For the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, we recorded a bad debt expense of $73,000and a bad debt recovery of $70,500, respectively. For the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, we recorded a bad debt expense of $20,000and a bad debt recovery of $31,000, respectively.

At December 31, 2020, the balance due to our President and CEO, Rik Deitsch, was $200,837, which is an unsecured demand loan that bears interest at 4%. During the year ended December 31, 2020, we advanced $22,150to and collected $254,000from Mr. Deitsch and the Companies owned by him. Additionally, accrued interest on the demand loan was $7,675and is included in the due to officer account. The Company has fully reserved receivables from companies owned by the Company's CEO. The reserve was $402,970as of December 31, 2020, which represents a full valuation allowance for amounts owed by these Companies.

6. DEBTS

Debts consist of the following at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

June 30,

2021

December 31,

2020

Notes payable - Unrelated third parties (Net of discount of $2,780and $1,500, respectively) (2) $ 1,316,094 $ 1,346,057
Convertible notes payable - Unrelated third parties (Net of discount of $185,315and $101,448, respectively) (3) 2,772,586 1,276,902
Convertible notes payable, at fair value (4) 5,039,868 1,832,439
Other advances from an unrelated third party (5) 225,000 225,000
SBA notes payable(6) 214,795 214,795
Ending balances 9,568,343 4,895,193
Less: Long-term portion-Convertible Notes payable-Unrelated third parties (979,654 ) (48,477 )
Less: Long-term portion- SBA notes payable (148,438 ) (204,070 )
Current portion $ 8,440,251 $ 4,642,646
F-14
(1) During 2010 we borrowed $200,000from one of our directors. Under the terms of the loan agreement, this loan was expected to be repaid in nine months to a year from the date of the loan along with interest calculated at 10% for the first month plus 12% after 30 days from funding. We are in default regarding this loan. The loan is under personal guarantee by Mr. Deitsch. We repaid the principal balance in full as of December 31, 2016. We repaid $40,000of the accrued interest during the first and second quarters of 2021. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we owed this director accrued interest of $148,899and $179,522, respectively. The interest expense for the three-months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 was $4,432and $4,914, respectively, and for the six-months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 was $9,377and $9,635, respectively.
(2) At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the balance of $1,316,094and $1,346,057net of discount of $2,780and $1,500, respectively, consisted of the following loans:
In August 2016, we issued two Promissory Notes for a total of $200,000($100,000each) to a company owned by a former director of the Company. The Notes carry interest at 12% annually and were originally due on the date that was six-months from the execution and funding of the note. The principal balance of $101,818and accrued interest of $21,023were settled on February 15, 2019 for $104,000with scheduled payments through May 1, 2020. During the first quarter of 2020, the settlement was further amended to $88,500. We recorded a gain on settlement of debt in other income for $15,500during the first quarter of 2020. The settlement balance of $88,500was repaid in full during November 2020. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we owed principal balance of $91,156, and accrued interest of $46,342and $40,917, respectively. The remaining principal balance of $91,156and accrued interest of $46,342is being disputed in court and negotiation for settlement. (See Note 12).
On August 2, 2011 under a settlement agreement with Liquid Packaging Resources, Inc. ("LPR"), we agreed to pay LPR a total of $350,000in monthly installments of $50,000beginning August 15, 2011 and ending on February 15, 2012. We signed the first amendment to the settlement agreement where we agreed to pay $175,000, which was the balance outstanding at December 31, 2011(this includes a $25,000penalty for non-payment). We repaid $25,000during the six months ended March 31, 2012. We did not make all of the payments under such amendment and as a result pursuant to the original settlement agreement, LPR had the right to sell 142,858shares (5,714,326shares pre reverse stock split) of our free trading stock held in escrow by their attorney and receive cash settlements for a total amount of $450,000(the initial $350,000plus total default penalties of $100,000). LPR sold the note to Southridge Partners, LLP ("Southridge") for consideration of $281,772in June 2012. In August 2013 the debt of $281,772reverted back to LPR.
At December 31, 2012, we owed University Centre West Ltd. approximately $55,410for rent, which was assigned and sold to Southridge, and it is currently outstanding and carries no interest.
In April 2016, we issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $10,000bearing interest at 10% annually. The note was due in one year from the execution and funding of the note. The note is in default and negotiation of settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the accrued interest is $5,272and $4,769.
In May 2016, the Company issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $75,000bearing monthly interest at a rate of 2%. The note was due in six months from the execution and funding of the note. During April 2017, we accepted the offer of a settlement to issue 5,000,000common shares as a repayment of $25,000. The note is in default and in negotiation of settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the outstanding principal balance is $50,000and accrued interest is $68,200and $62,167.
In June 2016, the Company issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $50,000bearing monthly interest at a rate of 2%. The note was due in six months from the execution and funding of the note. The note is in default and negotiation of settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the outstanding principal balance is $50,000and accrued interest is $61,400and $55,367, respectively.
F-15
A promissory note originally issued to an unrelated third party in August 2016 was restated in September 2019 in the amount of $333,543bearing monthly interest at a rate of 2.0% and was due September 2020. In connection with this restated note, we issued 20,000,000shares of our common stock. During September 2020, we issued a total of 10,000,000restricted shares due to the default on repayments. The shares were valued at fair value of $6,000. The common stock was valued at $5,895and recorded as a debt discount that was amortized over the life of the note. Amortization for this debt discount was fully amortized at December 31, 2020. The Note is in default and negotiation of settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the principal balance is $333,543, and the accrued interest is $146,759and $106,511, respectively.
On September 26, 2016, we issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $75,000bearing interest at 10% annually. The note was due in one year from the execution and funding of the note. In March 2018, $15,000of the principal balance of the note was assigned to an unrelated third party and is in negotiation of settlement. In January 2019, the remaining principal balance of $60,000and accrued interest of $15,900was restated in the form of a Convertible Note (See Note 6(4)). At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the principal balance outstanding is $15,000, and the accrued interest is $1,371.
In October 2016, we issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $50,000bearing monthly interest at a rate of 2%. The note was due in six months from the execution and funding of the note. The note is in default and in negotiation of settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the accrued interest is $57,700and $51,667, respectively.
In June 2017, we issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $12,500bearing interest at 10% annually. The note was due in one year from the execution and funding of the note. The note is in default and in negotiation of settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the accrued interest is $5,111and $4,483, respectively.
During July 2017, we received a loan for a total of $200,000from an unrelated third party. The loan was repaid through scheduled payments through August 2017 along with interest on average 15% annum. During June 2018, the loan was settled with two unrelated third parties for $130,401and $40,000, respectively, with the monthly scheduled repayments of approximately $5,000and $2,000per month to each unrelated party through July 2020. The Company repaid a total of $34,976, $42,698, and $44,478during 2018, 2019 and 2020, respectively. Additionally, repayment of $14,376was made during the first quarter of 2021. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the principal balance is $33,874and $48,250, respectively. The portion of settlement of $130,401was repaid in full as of March 31, 2021. The remaining balance of $33,874is in default and negotiation of settlement.
In July 2017, we issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $50,000with original issue discount of $10,000. The note was due in six months from the execution and funding of the note. The note is in default and in negotiation of settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the principal balance of the note is $50,000.
F-16
During September 2018 and 2019, a promissory note originally issued to an unrelated third party in September 2017 was amended in the amount of $36,000including original issuance discount of $6,000each due in September 2019 and 2020. The Note was further restated in September 2020. The restated principal balance was $33,000with the original issuance discount of $3,000and was due March 2021. The original issue discount is amortized over the term of the loan. Repayments of $7,000, $5,000, and $6,500have been made during 2018, 2019, and 2020, respectively. Additionally, repayment of $1,000was made during the first quarter of 2021. The Note is under personal guarantee by Mr. Deitsch. At December 31, 2020, the principal balance of the note is $29,500net of debt discount of $1,500. The remaining debt discount of $1,500was fully amortized as of March 2021. During March 2021, the remaining balance of $30,000was sold to an unrelated third party in the form of a convertible note at a fixed conversion price of $0.01per share (See Note 6(3)). The new note carries interest at 12% with scheduled monthly payments of $1,000beginning in April 2021 through March 2024.
During January 2020, a promissory note originally issued to an unrelated third party in October 2017 in the amount of $60,000and the Note of $76,076originally issued in July 2016 plus accrued interest of $12,149were combined and restated at a rate of 2.0%monthly due July 2020. During July 2020, the restated Note of $148,225plus accrued interest of $18,701was further restated. The new principal balance was $166,926that carries interest at a rate of 2.0% monthly and was due January 2021. During February 2021, we issued 29,072,500shares of common stock to satisfy the accrued interest of $23,258with fair value of $343,056(See Note 7). The settlement of accrued interest resulted in a loss on settlement of debt for $319,798in other expense. The principal balance of $166,926was further restated. The restated balance is $183,619with an original issuance discount of $16,693and was due August 2021. Amortization for the six months ended June 30, 2021 for this discount is $13,913. At December 31, 2020, the principal balance and accrued interest was $166,926and $18,917. At June 30, 2021, the restated principal balance is $180,839net of debt discount of $2,780. The note is in default and negotiation of settlement.
In November 2017, we issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $120,000with original issuance discount of $20,000. During March 2020, $50,000of the Note was settled for 125,000,000shares with a fair value of $87,500. We recorded a loss on settlement in other expense for $37,500in March 2020. An additional 36,000,000shares were issued to satisfy the default provision of the original note and 10,000,000shares were issued along with the restatement. The total fair value of issued stock was $32,200. The remaining balance of $70,000was restated with additional issuance discount of $14,000. The $84,000due in September 2020 is in default and negotiation of further settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the principal balance of the loan is $84,000.
In November 2017, we issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $18,000with original issuance discount of $3,000. The note is in default and in negotiation of settlement. The note was due in six months from the execution and funding of the note. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the principal balance of the note is $18,000and the accrued interest is $2,000.
F-17
(3) At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the balance of $2,772,586and $1,276,902net of discount of $185,315and $101,448, respectively, consisted of the following convertible loans:
In October 2017, we issued a promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount of $60,000with original issuance discount of $10,000and a conversion option. The note was due in six months from the execution and funding of the note. The loan is in default and in negotiation of settlement. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the principal balance of the note is $60,000.
During January through December 2018, we issued convertible notes payable to the 20 unrelated third parties for a total of $618,250with original issue discount of $62,950. The notes were due in six months from the execution and funding of each note. The notes are convertible into shares of Company's common stock at a conversion price ranging from $0.0003to $0.001per share. The total discount of $255,655and original issuance discount of $62,950have been fully amortized during 2019 for $28,421.

During February 2019, we issued convertible notes payable of $70,000with original issuance discount of $5,000. The notes were due in six months from the execution and funding of each note. The notes are convertible into shares of Company's common stock at a conversion price of $0.0005per share. During December 2019, $22,000of the Note was amended to extend the maturity date to June 2020. During August 2020, the convertible promissory notes of $38,500was amended to add additional original issuance discount (OID) of $7,550due February 2021. During October 2020, a convertible promissory note of $16,500was amended to add additional OID of $1,650due April 2021. In connection with the issuance of amended convertible notes, the Company granted the following warrants at an exercise price of $0.001per share. The warrants were valued using the Black-Scholes method and recorded as a debt discount. No warrants have been exercised. The Company classified embedded conversion features in the warrants as a derivative liability. The warrants were valued at their fair value of $729,469and $123,900on June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (See Note 8). The debt discounts associated with the warrants in August was for $38,500. The debt discounts associated with the warrants in October was for $16,500. The debt discounts are amortized over the life of the notes.

Month of

Issuance

Number of

Warrants

Fair

Value of

Warrants

Month of

Expiration

December, 2019 44,000,000 $ 7,370 August, 2020
August, 2020 92,100,000 $ 38,500 August, 2021
October, 2020 36,300,000 $ 16,500 October, 2022

During May 2019, we restated two convertible notes payable with additional original issue discount of $6,400. The two restated notes were due in August 2019 and are in default.

During November and December 2019, we issued two convertible promissory notes to the unrelated third party for $159,500with original issuance discount of $14,500. The notes were due six months from the execution and funding of the notes. The Noteholder had the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at a fixed conversion price ranging from $0.0002to $0.000275. The Notes are in default and negotiation of settlement.

F-18

During 2019, repayments of $13,500were made in cash to three of the Notes. Six of the Notes for a total of $87,100were repaid in stocks as the part of settlement of issuances of 800,000,000shares of common stocks during December 2019.

At December 31, 2019, the principal balance of the notes, net of discount of $17,370was $736,180. The remaining debt discount of $17,370has been fully amortized during the fiscal year 2020. Two of the above mentioned convertible notes payable were settled in March and April, 2021. One of the above mentioned convertible notes payable was repaid in cash for $10,000.

During the year ended December 31, 2020, we issued convertible notes payable of $555,600with original issuance discount of $53,600. $287,400of these notes were due in a year, and $268,200of the Notes are due in six months from the execution and funding of each note. The notes are convertible into shares of Company's common stock at a conversion price ranging from $0.0002to 0.0008per share. During July 2020, we issued a total of 1,000,000restricted shares to a Note holder due to the default on repayments of the promissory note of $22,000originated in December 2019. The shares were valued at fair value of $700(See Note 7). In addition, in connection with the issuance of two of the above mentioned convertible notes of $57,500with original issuance discount of $7,500due in one year, the Company granted the 71,875,000warrants at an exercise price of $0.002per share that expire one year from the date of issuance. The warrants are valued using the Black-Scholes method and recorded as a debt discount. No warrants have been exercised. The debt discounts associated with the warrants and OID for $50,000and $7,500, respectively, are amortized over the life of the notes. Amortization for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $83,720. The Company classified embedded conversion features in the warrants as a derivative liability. The warrants were valued at their fair value of $367,085and $65,634using the Black-Scholes method on June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (See Note 8).

At December 31, 2020, the principal balance of the notes, net of discount of $101,448is $1,276,902.

During the first quarter of 2021, we issued convertible promissory notes to the unrelated third parties for a total of $717,667with original issuance discount of $93,609. During the second quarter of 2021, we issued convertible promissory notes to the unrelated third parties for a total of $864,225with original issuance discount of $112,725. The Noteholders have the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at a conversion price ranging from $0.0003to $0.002per share. The notes are due one year from the execution and funding of the notes.

During March 2021, the remaining balance of promissory note of $30,000originally issued in September 2018 was sold to an unrelated third party in the form of a convertible note at a fixed conversion price of $0.01per share (See Note 6(2)). The new note carries interest at 12% with scheduled monthly payments of $1,000beginning in April 2021 through March 2024. Repayment of $2,842has been made during the second quarter of 2021. The principal balance as of June 30, 2021 is $27,158, and the interest expense for the three months ended June 30, 2021 is $1,158.

During March 2021, in connection with the settlement of the $6,000of the Note of $11,000originated in November 2018, we issued 11,000,000shares of common stocks in satisfaction of $6,000of the Note with a fair value of $104,500(Note 7) and made a repayment of $5,000in cash. The settlement resulted in a loss on settlement of debt in other expense for $98,500. During April 2021, in connection with this settlement of the remaining balance of $8,500of the Note of $12,000originated in December 2018, we issued 2,000,000shares of common stocks in satisfaction of $4,000of the Note with a fair value of $15,200(Note 7) and made a repayment of $4,500in cash. The settlement resulted in a loss on settlement of debt in other expense for $11,200.

At the date of this report, $1,152,200of the above mentioned convertible notes payable are in default and in negotiation of settlement. The total discount amortization on all notes for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 was $58,330and $122,469, respectively. At June 30, 2021, the principal balance of the notes, net of discount of $185,315is $2,772,586.

(4) At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the balance of $5,039,868and $1,832,439, respectively, consisted of the following convertible loans:
The remaining balance of $20,000of a Convertible Note of $120,000originated in March 2016 is in default and negotiation of settlement. The conversion price is equal to 55% of the average of the three lowest volume weighted average prices for the three consecutive trading days immediately prior to but not including the conversion date. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the convertible notes payable with principal balance of $20,000plus accrued interest of $19,138and $17,128, respectively, at fair value, were recorded at $71,160and $69,433, respectively.
F-19
During May 2017, we issued a Convertible Debenture in the amount of $64,000to an unrelated third party. The note was due on May 4, 2018. The Note holder has the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at a sixty percent (60%) of the lowest trading price of our restricted common stock for the twentytrading days preceding the conversion date. We have accrued interest at default interest rate of 20% after the note's maturity date. After prior conversions, at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the remaining principal of $12,629plus accrued interest of $13,571and $12,308, respectively, at fair value, were recorded at $45,781and $49,875, respectively. The remaining principal balance of the Note is in default.
During February through August 2018, we issued seven convertible promissory notes to an unrelated third party due one year from the execution dates. The principal balance of these Notes on December 31, 2019 was $511,319. During September 2020, the Note holder received a total of 107,133,333shares of our restricted common stock in satisfaction of the principal balance of $22,000and accrued interest of $10,140. During October 2020, the Note holder received a total of 107,817,770shares of our restricted common stock in satisfaction of the principal balance of $22,000and accrued interest of $10,345. During October 2020, the Note holder sold the remaining debt principal value as of October 22, 2020 of $509,301and accrued interest of $234,417for $250,000to a non-related party. The new note of $250,000carries interest at 8%. The Noteholder has the right to convert the note into shares of our restricted common stock at sixty percent of the lowest trading price of our restricted common stock for the twenty-five prior trading days including the conversion date. In connection with the issuance of the convertible note payable, we recorded a day-one derivative loss of $286,969. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the convertible note payable with principal balance of $250,000plus accrued interest of $13,808and $3,890, respectively, at fair value, were recorded at $525,463and $521,370.
During July 2018, we issued a convertible debenture in the amount of $50,000to an unrelated third party. The note carries interest at 8% and was due in July 2019, unless previously converted into shares of restricted common stock. We have accrued interest at default interest rate of 24% after the note's maturity date. The Note holder has the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at fifty five percent of the average three lowest trading price of our restricted common stock for the fifteen trading days including the date of receipt of conversion notice. In connection with the issuance of the convertible note payable, we recorded a day-one derivative loss of $46,734. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the convertible note payable with principal balance of $50,000plus accrued interest of $27,441and $21,490, at fair value, was recorded at $143,006and $146,232, respectively.
During August 2018, we issued a convertible debenture in the amount of $20,000to an unrelated third party. The note carries interest at 8% and was due in August 2019, unless previously converted into shares of restricted common stock. We have accrued interest at default interest rate of 24% after the note's maturity date. The Note holder has the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at fifty five percent of the average three lowest trading price of our restricted common stock for the fifteen trading days including the date of receipt of conversion notice. In connection with the issuance of the convertible note payable, we recorded a day-one derivative loss of $17,829. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the convertible note payable with principal balance of $20,000plus accrued interest of $10,503and $8,123, at fair value, was recorded at $56,327and $57,524, respectively.
During January 2019, the principal balance of $60,000from a promissory note of $75,000originated in September 2016 (See Note 6(2)) and accrued interest of $15,900was restated in the form of a Convertible Note. The new note of $75,900was due in one year from the restatement of the note. The Noteholder has the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at 50% discount to the average trading price of the three lowest closing stock prices for the twenty days prior to the notice of conversion. In connection with the issuance of the convertible note payable, we recorded a day-one derivative loss of $75,900. During November 2020, the Note holder assigned $20,000of the $75,900convertible note restated in January 2019 to a third party. The third party subsequently received a total of 100,000,000shares of our restricted common stock in satisfaction the $20,000of the Note with a fair value of $140,000. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the convertible note payable of $55,900, at fair value, was recorded at $117,209and $129,832. The note was due January 2021. The Note is in default and negotiation of settlement.
F-21
During February 2019, we issued a convertible promissory note to an unrelated third party in the amount up to $1,000,000paid upon tranches. The note is due two years from the execution and funding of the note per tranche. The Noteholder has the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at a conversion price of the lower of $0.0005or 50% discount to the average trading price of the three lowest closing stock prices for the twenty days prior to the notice of conversion. The eight total tranches of the Note in the amount of $372,374and $20,199have been funded during 2019 and 2020, respectively. An additional two tranches of the Note for a total of $117,000have been funded, and repayment of $40,480has been made during the first and second quarter of 2021. $15,000has been funded after June 30, 2021. In connection with issuance of the convertible note, the Noteholder agreed to eliminate two outstanding Notes of $27,000and the accrued interest of $11,412that were held by the Noteholder's defunct entities. In connection with the issuance of the convertible note payable tranches during the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recorded a day-one derivative loss of $1,973,612for the period. During May and June 2019, the Note holder made conversions of a total of 750,000,000shares of stock satisfying the principal balance of $100,000for a fair value of $275,000. During January 2020 through February 2020, the Note holder received a total of 500,000,000shares of our restricted common stock in satisfaction the $175,000of the Note with a fair value of $425,000. During February through June 2021, the Note holder received a total of 240,350,000shares of our restricted common stock in satisfaction the $120,175of the Note with a fair value of $2,344,399(See Note 7). The remaining balance of $88,917is due June 2023. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the convertible note payable with principal balance of $73,917and $117,572, at fair value, was recorded at $960,922and $282,173.
Number of Fair Value of
Date shares converted Debt Converted
2/25/2021 137,700,000 $ 1,500,930
3/3/2021 67,380,000 $ 599,682
4/26/2021 27,070,000 $ 192,197
6/1/2021 5,700,000 $ 35,340
6/24/2021 2,500,000 $ 16,250
During June 2019, we issued a convertible promissory note to an unrelated third party for $240,000with original issuance discount of $40,000. The note was due one year from the execution and funding of the notes. In connection with the issuance of this note, we issued 16,000,000shares of our restricted common stock. The common stock was valued at $4,688and recorded as a debt discount that was amortized over the life of the note. The Noteholder has the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at a conversion price of the lower of $0.0005 or 50% discount to the average trading price of the three lowest closing stock prices for the twenty days prior to the notice of conversion. In connection with the issuance of the convertible note payable, we recorded a day-one derivative loss of $240,000. Amortization for the debt discount was fully amortized as of June 30, 2020 for $22,344. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the convertible note payable with principal balance of $240,000, at fair value, was recorded at $3,120,000and $576,000. The Note is in default and negotiation of settlement.
(5) At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the balance of $225,000consisted of the advances received from a third party during the periods from May 2019 through May 2020 in connection with a Joint Venture proposal. The deposits were considered as payments towards the purchase of equity in the joint venture. The joint venture is currently on hold pending the outcome of the lawsuit with the Securities and Exchange Commission (see Note 12).
(6)

During May 2020, we entered into a two-year loan agreement with the U. S. Small Business Administration for a Payroll Protection Program (PPP) loan, for $64,895with an annual interest rate of one percent (1%), with a term of twenty-four (24) months, whereby a portion of the loan proceeds have been used for certain labor costs, office rent costs and utilities, which may be subject to a loan forgiveness, pursuant to the terms of the SBA/PPP program.

During April and June 2020, the Company executed the standard loan documents required for securing a loan from the SBA under its Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance program (the "EIDL Loan") considering the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Company's business. Pursuant to the Loan Authorization and Agreement (the "SBA Loan Agreement"), the principal amount of the EIDL Loan was $150,000, with proceeds to be used for working capital purposes. Interest accrues at the rate of 3.75% per annum. Installment payments, including principal and interest, are due 24 months from the date of the SBA Loan Agreement in the amount of $731. The balance of principal and interest is payable over a 360-month period from the date of the SBA Loan Agreement. In connection therewith, the Company received a $5,000advance, which does not have to be repaid. We recorded it as other income in April 2020. The SBA requires that the Company collateralize the loan to the maximum extent up to the loan amount. If business fixed assets do not "fully secure" the loan the lender may include trading assets (using 10% of current book value for the calculation), and must take available equity in the personal real estate (residential and investment) of the principals as collateral.

The accrued interest as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 for the above mentioned PPP and EIDL loans are $6,797and $3,660, respectively.

At June 30, 2021, the future minimum principal payments for the above mentioned PPP and EIDL loans are as follows:

Years Amount
2021(6 months remaining) $ 10,725
2022 56,290
2023 3,283
2024 3,408
2025 3,538
Thereafter 137,551
214,795
Less: Long-term portion - SBA notes payable (148,438 )
Current portion $ 66,357
F-22

7. STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

Series A Preferred Stock

Effective October 30, 2017, pursuant to authority of its Board of Directors, the Company filed a Certificate of Determination to authorize the issuance of 20,000,000shares of stock designated "preferred shares", issuable from time to time in one or more series and authorize the Board of Directors to fix the number of shares constituting any such series, and to determine or alter the dividend rights, dividend rate, conversion rights, voting rights, right and terms of redemption (including sinking fund provisions), the redemption price or prices and the liquidation preference of any wholly unissued series of such preferred shares, and the number of shares constituting any such series.

Effective October 30, 2017 the Board of Directors authorized the issuance of 3,000,000shares of Series A Preferred Stock ("Series A Preferred"). Terms of the Series A Preferred include the following:

1. The Series A Preferred votes with the Company's common stock as a single class on all matters or consents for the Company's common stockholders. Each share of Series A Preferred is entitled to one thousand votes per share.
2. The Series A Preferred will not be entitled to dividends unless the Company pays cash dividends or dividends in other property to holders of outstanding shares of common stock, in which event, each outstanding share of the Series A Preferred will be entitled to receive dividends of cash or property in an amount or value equal to one thousand multiplied by the amount paid in respect of one share of common stock. Any dividend payable to the Series A Preferred will have the same record and payment date and terms as the dividend payable on the common stock.
3. Upon any voluntary or involuntary liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company, the holders of all shares of Series A Preferred then outstanding shall be entitled to be paid out of the assets of the Company available for distribution to its stockholders an amount in cash equal to $0.133in cash per share before any distribution is made on any shares of the Company's common stock. If upon any voluntary or involuntary liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company, the application of all amounts available for payments with respect to Series A Preferred would not result in payment in full of Series A Preferred, the holders shall share equally and ratably in any distribution of assets of the Company in proportion to the full liquidation preference to which each is entitled.
4. The Series A Preferred does not have any redemption rights.

Common Stock Issued for Conversion of Convertible Debt

During February through June 2021, the Note holder received a total of 240,350,000shares of our restricted common stock in satisfaction the $120,175of the Note with a fair value of $2,344,399(See Note 6)

Number of Fair Value of
Date shares converted Debt Converted
2/25/2021 137,700,000 $ 1,500,930
3/3/2021 67,380,000 $ 599,682
4/26/2021 27,070,000 $ 192,197
6/1/2021 5,700,000 $ 35,340
6/24/2021 2,500,000 $ 16,250
F-23

Common Stock Issued for Settlement of Debt

During February 2021, we issued 29,072,500shares of common stock to satisfy the accrued interest of $23,258on a promissory note of $166,926restated in July 2020 with fair value of $343,056. The settlement of accrued interest resulted in a loss on settlement of debt in other expense for $319,798(See Note 6).

During March 2021, in connection with the settlement of a Note of $11,000originated in November 2018, we issued 11,000,000shares of common stock in satisfaction of $6,000of the Note with a fair value of $104,500and made a repayment of $5,000in cash. The settlement resulted in a loss on settlement of debt in other expense for $98,500(See Note 6).

During April 2021, in connection with the settlement of the remaining balance of $8,500of the Note of $12,000originated in December 2018, we issued 2,000,000share of common stocks in satisfaction of $4,000of the Note with a fair value of $15,200. The settlement resulted in a loss on settlement of debt in other expense for $11,200(See Note 6).

Common Stock Issued for Debt Modification and Penalty

During January 2021, we issued a total of 25,000,000restricted shares to a Note holder due to the default on repayments of the promissory note of $166,926amended in July 2020. The shares were valued at fair value of $107,500(See Note 6).

Common Stock Issued for Consulting Service

During June 2021, the Company signed an agreement with a consultant for services for six months for which the Company is to issue a total of 30,000,000shares of the Company's restricted common stock. 5,000,000of the shares were issued upon execution of the agreement and 5,000,000shares will be issued every 30 days through November 2021. The 5,000,000shares issued upon execution were valued at $33,000. The equity compensation charge of $1,445has been recorded during June 2021. The remaining unrecognized compensation cost of $31,555will be recognized by the Company over the remaining service period. Additional 10,000,000shares have been issued after June 30, 2021 (See Note 13).

F-24

8. STOCK WARRANTS

Common Stock Warrants

On March 3, 2016, in connection with the issuance of a convertible note, we granted five-year warrants to purchase an aggregate of 2,500,000shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.03per share. The warrants were valued at their fair value of $0and $9using the Black-Scholes method at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The warrants expired in March 2021.

During December 2019, the Company granted 44,000,000warrants at an exercise price of $0.001per share in connection with amendment of one convertible notes payable of $22,000. The warrants were valued at $7,370using the Black-Scholes method and recorded as a debt discount and additional paid in capital. The warrants expired in August 2020.

During August and October 2020, in connection with the issuance of amended convertible notes, the Company granted the following warrants at an exercise price of $0.001per share. The warrants were valued using the Black-Scholes method and recorded as a debt discount. No warrants have been exercised. The Company classified embedded conversion features in the warrants as a derivative liability. The warrants were valued at their fair value of $729,469and $123,900using the Black-Scholes method on June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

Month of Issuance

Number of

Warrants

Month of

Expiration

August, 2020 92,100,000 August, 2021
October, 2020 36,300,000 October, 2022

During November and December 2020, in connection with the issuance of two convertible notes, the Company granted the following warrants at an exercise price of $0.002per share. The warrants are valued using the Black-Scholes method and recorded as a debt discount. No warrants have been exercised. The Company classified embedded conversion features in the warrants as a derivative liability. The warrants were valued at their fair value of $367,085and $65,634using the Black-Scholes method on June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

Month of Issuance

Number of

Warrants

Month of

Expiration

November, 2020 35,937,500 November, 2021
December, 2020 35,937,500 December, 2021

A summary of warrants outstanding in conjunction with private placements of common stock were as follows during the year ended December 31, 2020 and the six months ended June 30, 2021:

Number Of
shares
Weighted
average
exercise price
Balance December 31, 2019 52,500,000 $ 0.0028
Exercised - -
Issued 200,275,000 0.0014
Expired (50,000,000 ) 0.0015
Balance December 31, 2020 202,775,000 $ 0.0017
Exercised - -
Issued - -
Expired (2,500,000 ) 0.03
Balance June 30, 2021 200,275,000 $ 0.0014

The following table summarizes information about fixed-price warrants outstanding as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

Exercise Price

Weighted

Average

Number Outstanding

Weighted
Average
Contractual
Life

Weighted
Average

Exercise

Price

June 30, 2021 $ 0.001-0.002 201,131,354 0.44years $ 0.0014
December 31, 2020 $ 0.001-0.03 51,086,612 0.93years $ 0.0017

At June 30, 2021, the aggregate intrinsic value of all warrants outstanding and expected to vest was $1,029,638. The intrinsic value of warrant share is the difference between the fair value of our restricted common stock and the exercise price of such warrant share to the extent it is "in-the-money". Aggregate intrinsic value represents the value that would have been received by the holders of in-the-money warrants had they exercised their warrants on the last trading day of the year and sold the underlying shares at the closing stock price on such day. The intrinsic value calculation is based on $0.0065, the closing stock price of our restricted common stock on June 30, 2021. There were 200,275,000in-the-money warrants at June 30, 2021.

F-25

9. ACCRUED EXPENSES

Accrued expenses consisted of the following:

June 30,

2021

December 31, 2020
Accrued consulting fees $ 161,550 $ 166,900
Accrued settlement expenses - 35,000
Accrued payroll taxes 205,062 215,581
Accrued interest 400,953 351,830
Accrued others 8,229 11,121
Total $ 775,794 $ 780,432

10. PREPAID EXPENSES

Prepaid expenses and other current assets consist of the following:

June 30,

2021

December 31, 2020
Supplier advances for future purchases $ 270,162 $ 246,162
Reserve for supplier advances (246,162 ) (246,162 )
Net supplier advances 24,000 -
Prepaid professional fees 24,650 10,000
Deferred stock compensation 31,555 -
Total $ 80,205 $ 10,000

We performed an evaluation of our inventory and related accounts at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and increased the reserve on supplier advances for future venom purchases by $0and $21,303, respectively. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the total valuation allowance for prepaid venom is $246,162.

F-26

11. CONVERTIBLE NOTES RECEIVABLE

On March 10, 2021, we purchased a convertible note from an unrelated third party (the "Third Party") for a total of $26,950with original issuance discount of $2,450. The note is convertible into common shares for $0.01per common share and matures on March 10, 2022. The original issuance discount is amortized over the life of note. The debt discount as of June 30, 2021 was $1,835.

On May 20, 2021, we purchased a convertible note from the Third Party for a total of $145,200with original issuance discount of $13,200. The note is convertible into common shares for $0.01per common share and matures on May 20, 2022. The original issuance discount is amortized over the life of note. The debt discount as of June 30, 2021 was $12,100.

Amortization for all the convertible notes receivable was $1,715recognized as other income in the statement of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021.

12. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Operating Leases

In February 2016, we entered into our current three-year operating lease for monthly payments of approximately $3,200which expired in February 2019. We continued the lease on a month-to-month basis until May 2020when it was terminated.

ReceptoPharm leases a lab and renewed its operating lease agreement for five years beginning August 1, 2017 for monthly payments of approximately $6,900with a 5% increase each year.In February of 2021, we signed an updated lease with extended terms through January 1, 2023. The lease calls for monthly payments of approximately $6,500with a 4% increase each year.

June 30, December 31,
2021 2020
Lease cost
Operating lease cost $ 40,198 $ 89,021
Short-term lease cost - 18,698
Total lease cost $ 40,198 $ 107,719
Balance sheet information
Operating ROU Assets $ 136,651 $ 144,010
Operating lease obligations, current portion 73,632 82,873
Operating lease obligations, non-current portion 39,611 60,447
Total operating lease obligations $ 113,243 $ 143,320
Weighted average remaining lease term (in years) - operating leases 1.50 1.67
Weighted average discount rate-operating leases 8 % 8 %
Supplemental cash flow information related to leases were as follows:
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of operating lease liabilities $ 62,917 $ 98,780

Future minimum payments under these lease agreements are as follows:

December 31, Total
2021 (Remaining 6 months) $ 39,511
2022 81,080
Total future lease payments $ 120,591
Less imputed interest 7,348
Total $ 113,243

Consulting Agreements

During July 2015, we signed an agreement with a company to provide for consulting services for five years. In connection with the agreement, 500,000shares of our restricted common stock and a one year 8% note of $50,000were granted. The shares were valued at $0.18per share. As the services provided were in dispute, the shares and note payable have not been issued as of June 30, 2021. We have accrued the $142,500in accrued expense and equity compensation.

F-27

During October 2015, the Company signed an agreement with a consultant for consulting services for a year. In connection with the agreement, 2,500,000shares of the Company's restricted common stock were granted and the Company was to make monthly cash payments of $3,000. As of December 31, 2016, the Company recorded an equity compensation charge of $31,750, however, only 1,000,000of the shares have been issued. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, $19,150has been recorded in accrued expense to account for the 1,500,000shares of common stock that have not been issued.

Litigation

Paul Reid et al. v. Nutra Pharma Corp. et al.

On August 26, 2016, certain of former ReceptoPharm employees and a former ReceptoPharm consultant filed a lawsuit in the 17th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County, Florida (Case No. CACE16-015834) against Nutra Pharma and ReceptoPharm to recover $315,000allegedly owing to them under a settlement agreement reached in an involuntary bankruptcy action that was brought by the same individuals in 2012 and for payment of unpaid wages/breach of written debt confirms.

On June 24, 2021, the parties entered into a confidential settlement agreement of the lawsuit. Nutra Pharma has fully performed under the settlement and considers the case fully resolved.

Get Credit Healthy, Inc. v. Nutra Pharma Corp. and Rik Deitsch, Case No. CACE 18-017055

On August 1, 2018, Get Credit Healthy, Inc. filed a lawsuit against the Company and Rik Deitsch (collectively the "Defendants") in the 17th Judicial Circuit Court in and for Broward County, Florida (Case No. CACE 18-017055) to recover $100,000allegedly owed under an amended promissory note dated April 12, 2017. Counsel for Get Credit Healthy, Inc. requested an early mediation conference in an attempt to resolve our dispute. We agreed to this request, and mediation took place on February 15, 2019. At December 31, 2018, we owed principal balance of $101,818and accrued interest of $21,023. The lawsuit was settled on February 15, 2019 for $104,000and was further amended. The repayments were made in full as of November 2020 (See Note 6).

CSA 8411, LLC v. Nutra Pharma Corp., Case No. CACE 18-023150

On October 12, 2018, CSA 8411, LLC filed a lawsuit against the Company in the 17th Judicial Circuit Court in and for Broward County, Florida (Case No. CACE 18-023150) to recover $100,000allegedly owed under an amended promissory note dated April 12, 2017. On November 1, 2018, the Company filed its Answer and Affirmative Defenses to the Complaint. The Company believes that this lawsuit is without merit. Moreover, the Company believes that it has a number of valid defenses to this claim. Among other things, the owner of CSA 8411, LLC violated the terms of a Binding Memorandum of Understanding by failing to invest in the Company and fraudulently inducing the Company to enter into the subject amended promissory note (contrary to the Get Credit Healthy lawsuit discussed above, we are certain that this individual is the majority owner of CSA 8411, LLC). Opposing counsel reached out to schedule mediation, and mediation was set for June 21, 2019 in Plantation, FL however the mediation was unsuccessful. At June 30, 2021, we owed principal balance of $91,156and accrued interest of $46,342(See Note 6) if the defenses and our new claims are deemed to be of no merit.

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Defendant also filed affirmative claims against the Plaintiff, its owner Dan Oran and several related entities. The case has not been set for trial as of this date.

Securities and Exchange Commission v. Nutra Pharma Corporation, Erik Deitsch, and Sean Peter McManus

On September 28, 2018, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York (Case No. 2:18-cv-05459) against the Company, Mr. Deitsch, and Mr. McManus. The lawsuit alleges that, from July 2013 through June 2018, the Company and the other defendants' defrauded investors by making materially false and misleading statements about the Company and violated anti-fraud and other securities laws.

The violations alleged against the Company by the SEC include: (a) raising over $920,000 in at least two private placement offerings for which the Company failed to file required registration statements with the SEC; (b) issuing a series of materially false or misleading press releases; (c) making false statements in at least one Form 10-Q; and (d) failing to make required public filings with the SEC to disclose the Company's issuance of millions of shares of stock. The lawsuit makes additional allegations against Mr. McManus and Mr. Deitsch, including that Mr. McManus acted as a broker without SEC registration and defrauded at least one investor by making false statements about the Company, that Mr. Deitsch engaged in manipulative trades of the Company's stock by offering to pay more for shares he was purchasing than the amount the seller was willing to take, and that Mr. Deitsch failed to make required public filings with the SEC. The lawsuit seeks both injunctive and monetary relief.

On May 29, 2019 (following each of the defendants filing motions to dismiss), the SEC filed a First Amended Complaint which generally alleged the same conduct as its original Complaint, but accounted for certain guidance provided by the United States Supreme Court in a case that had been recently decided. Each of the defendants then moved to dismiss the SEC's First Amended Complaint. On March 31, 2020, the Court entered an Order granting in part and denying in part the various motions to dismiss. Following that Order, the SEC filed a Second Amended Complaint (the operative pleading) and the defendants have filed their answers which generally deny liability. At this time, discovery is closed and the SEC has indicated an intent to file a summary judgment motion regarding certain non-fraud claims asserted in its Second Amended Complaint. The defendants have opposed the SEC's request to file such motion(s). The Court conducted a hearing on February 23, 2021 and set an initial briefing schedule for the SEC's Motion for Partial Summary Judgment wherein the Plaintiffs' Motion for Partial Summary Judgment was due on April 5, 2021, the Defendants' Consolidated (i.e., collectively, Nutra Pharma Corporation, Erik "Rik" Deitsch, and Sean McManus) Response Brief to the SEC's Motion was due May 3, 2021, and the Plaintiffs' Reply Brief was due on May 19, 2021. On March 23, 2021, the Plaintiff filed a Motion for Extension of Time to file the Motion for Partial Summary Judgment. On April 9, 2021, the Plaintiff filed a Motion for Partial Summary Judgment, Defendants' filed a Memorandum of Law in Opposition to Plaintiff's Motion on May 7, 2021, and Plaintiff filed its Reply brief on May 21, 2021. At this time, the Court has not ruled on the pending Motion. The Company disputes the allegations in this lawsuit and continues to vigorously defend against the SEC's claims. Mr. Deitsch and Mr. McManus have similarly defended the lawsuit since its filing and each contest liability. The Company does not believe that it engaged in any fraudulent activity or made any material misrepresentations concerning the Company and/or its products.

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13. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

Convertible Notes Payable

Pursuant to the Note agreement in the amount up to $1,000,000signed in February 2019, the principal balance of the note is $73,917at June 30, 2021. Proceeds of $15,000have been funded subsequent to June 30, 2021. The remaining balance of $88,917is due June 2023.

During July and August 2021, we issued convertible promissory notes to the unrelated third parties for a total of $415,150with original issuance discount of $54,150. The Noteholders have the right to convert the note into shares of Common Stock at a conversion price of $0.002per share. The notes are due one year from the execution and funding of the notes.

Common Stock Issued for Consulting Service

During July and August 2021, 10,000,000shares have been issued pursuant to the agreement signed in June 2021 with a consultant for services for six months for which the Company is to issue a total of 30,000,000shares of the Company's restricted common stock through November 2021.

Convertible notes receivable

On August 5, 2021, we purchased a convertible note from the Third Party for a total of $55,000with original issuance discount of $5,000. The note is convertible into common shares for $0.01per common share and mature on August 5, 2022.

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Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

Introduction

Our business during the six months ended June 30, 2021 has focused upon marketing our homeopathic drugs for the treatment of pain:

● Nyloxin® (Stage 2 Pain)

● Nyloxin® Extra Strength (Stage 3 Pain)

● Pet Pain-Away

● Equine Pain-Away

● Luxury Feet

During the six months ended June 30, 2021 and thereafter, the following has occurred:

On February 12, 2021 we announced that we are focusing on our intellectual property portfolio and have engaged new IP attorneys at Christopher & Weisberg P.A.

On February 23, 2021 we provided updates on our work in improving our existing facilities for manufacturing and validation of our drug products. This included the renewal of our lease for our current lab space and bringing all of manufacturing in-house.

On March 11, 2021 we announced that we had engaged AccuReg, Inc. as outside Regulatory and Quality Assurance consultants as part of our work in improving our existing facilities for manufacturing and validation of our drug products.

On March 16, 2021 we announced our plans for the marketing and distribution of Luxury Feet; an over-the-counter pain reliever and anti-inflammatory product that is designed for women who experience pain or discomfort due to high heels and stilettos.

On April 15, 2021 we announced that our newest product, Luxury Feet, was available for purchase on Amazon.com.

On May 24, 2021, we announced plans for expanding the marketing of our over-the-counter pain relievers and anti-inflammatory products by working with influencers on several social media platforms. These will include celebrities as well as professional and Olympic athletes that have benefitted from our products.

On May 27, 2021, we provided updates on increasing our manufacturing capabilities for the production of our line of over-the-counter pain relievers and anti-inflammatory drugs. As part of this process, we have completed the design and purchase for a new liquid filling line that includes automatic filling, capping, coding, labeling and heat shrinking for most of our products.

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The new equipment will allow production of up to 40 bottles per minute, which greatly increases our manufacturing capacity. The equipment was validated, certified and in production in August of 2021.

On June 2, 2021, we announced that we had signed an agreement with professional snowboarder Jake Vedder as a celebrity endorser of Nyloxin for Chronic Pain relief. Mr. Vedder will provide marketing content, videos and testimonials on the use of our product and as a social media influencer.

On June 4, 2021, we announced our plans for increasing sales of our over-the-counter pain relievers through private label agreements that will rebrand Nyloxin. The first private label distributor contract has been executed with sales expected to start within the next 4-6 weeks. Their marketing plan includes direct sales, targeted landing pages and aggressive marketing through social media.

On June 8, 2021, we announced that Diverse Health Services of Metro-Detroit has added the Nyloxin line of products to their offerings. Nyloxin is already being sold in-house at their facilities and will be added shortly to their online marketplace. Their marketing plan includes direct sales to patients and other medical facilities, sales through their websites and social media utilizing their online platforms as well as videos featuring Dr. Randall Tent.

On July 15, 2021, we announced that we had engaged the Washington DC-based government affairs consulting firm, Vitello Consulting. The firm will work with elected officials as well as governmental agencies to increase the awareness of Nutra Pharma's products and technologies with the goal of improving sales, garnering grants and potentially speeding drug applications.

On July 23, 2021, we announced that we filed a new provisional patent to protect our intellectual property surrounding our development of nerve agent counter measures.

Nyloxin®/Nyloxin® Extra Strength

We offer Nyloxin®/Nyloxin® Extra Strength as our over-the-counter (OTC) pain reliever that has been clinically proven to treat moderate to severe (Stage 2) chronic pain.

Nyloxin® and Nyloxin® Extra Strength are available as a two ounce topical gel for treating joint pain and pain associated with arthritis and repetitive stress, and as a one ounce oral spray for treating lower back pain, migraines, neck aches, shoulder pain, cramps, and neuropathic pain. Both the topical gel and oral spray are packaged and sold as a one-month supply.

Nyloxin® and Nyloxin® Extra Strength offer several benefits as a pain reliever. With increasing concern about consumers using opioid and acetaminophen-based pain relievers, the Nyloxin® products provide an alternative that does not rely on opiates or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, otherwise known as NSAIDs, for their pain relieving effects. Nyloxin® also has a well-defined safety profile. Since the early 1930s, the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of Nyloxin®, Asian cobra venom, has been studied in more than 46 human clinical studies. The data from these studies provide clinical evidence that cobra venom provides an effective treatment for pain with few side effects and has the following benefits:

● safe and effective;

● all natural;

● long-acting;

● easy to use;

● non-narcotic;

● non-addictive; and

● analgesic and anti-inflammatory.

Potential side effects from the use of Nyloxin® are rare, but may include headache, nausea, vomiting, sore throat, allergic rhinitis and coughing.

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The primary difference between Nyloxin® and Nyloxin® Extra Strength is the dilution level of the venom. The approximate dilution levels for Nyloxin® and Nyloxin® Extra Strength are as follows:

Nyloxin®

● Topical Gel: 30 mcg/mL

● Oral Spray: 70 mcg/mL

Nyloxin® Extra Strength

● Topical Gel: 60 mcg/mL

● Oral Spray: 140 mcg/mL

In December 2011, we began marketing Nyloxin® and Nyloxin® Extra Strength at www.nyloxin.comand on www.Amazon.com/nyloxin. Both Nyloxin® and Nyloxin® Extra Strength are packaged in a roll-on container, squeeze bottle and as an oral spray. Additionally, Nyloxin® topical gel is available in an 8 ounce pump bottle.

We are currently marketing Nyloxin® and Nyloxin® Extra Strength as treatments for moderate to severe chronic pain. Nyloxin® is available as an oral spray for treating back pain, neck pain, headaches, joint pain, migraines, and neuralgia and as a topical gel for treating joint pain, neck pain, arthritis pain, and pain associated with repetitive stress. Nyloxin® Extra Strength is available as an oral spray and gel application for treating the same physical indications, but is aimed at treating the most severe (Stage 3) pain that inhibits one's ability to function fully.

Nyloxin® Military Strength

In December 2012, we announced the availability of Nyloxin® Military Strength for sale to the United States Military and Veteran's Administration. Over the past few years, the U.S. Department of Defense has been reporting an increase in the use and abuse of prescription medications, particularly opiates. In 2009, close to 3.8 million prescriptions for pain relievers were written in the military. This staggering number was more than a 400% increase from the number of prescriptions written in the military in 2001. But prescription drugs are not the only issue. The most common and seemingly harmless way to treat pain is with non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). But there are risks. Overuse can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, heartburn, ulcers and internal bleeding. In severe cases chest pain, heart failure, kidney dysfunction and life-threatening allergic reactions can occur. It is reported that approximately 7,600 people in America die from NSAID use and some 78,000 are hospitalized. Ibuprofen, also an NSAID has been of particular concern in the military. The terms "Ranger Candy" and "Military Candy" refer to the service men and women who are said to use 800mg doses of Ibuprofen to control their pain. But when taking anti-inflammatory Ibuprofen in high doses for chronic pain, there is potential for critical health risks; abuse can lead to serious stomach problems, internal bleeding and even kidney failure. There are significantly greater health risks when abuse of this drug is combined with alcohol intake. Our goal is that with Nyloxin®, we can greatly reduce the instances of opiate abuse and overuse of NSAIDS in high risk groups like the US military. The Nyloxin® Military Strength represents the strongest version of Nyloxin® available and is approximately twice as strong as Nyloxin® Extra Strength. We are working with outside consultants to register Nyloxin® Military Strength and the other Nyloxin® products for sale to the US government and the various arms of the military as well as the Veteran's Administration. In February of 2018, Nyloxin was added to the Federal Supply Schedule but was subsequently removed the following week without an adequate explanation. We have continued to work with our consultants to understand why our products were improperly removed the Federal Supply Schedule and when we may be able to get re-listed on the Federal Supply Schedule for eventual sales to governmental agencies or to the US Military.

International Sales

We are pursuing international drug registrations in Canada, Mexico, India, Australia, New Zealand, Central and South America and Europe. Since European rules for homeopathic drugs are different than the rules in the US, we cannot estimate when this process will be completed. On March 25, 2013 we announced the publication of our patent and trademark for Nyloxin® in India. We are actively seeking new distribution partners in India.

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On May 14, 2015 we announced that we had engaged the Nature's Clinic to begin the process of regulatory approval of our Company's Over-the-Counter pain drug, Nyloxin® for marketing and distribution in Canada. The Nature's Clinic has already begun setting up their Chatham, Ontario warehouse. Due to lack of funding, we have waited to complete the approval process to begin distributing Nyloxin® and expect to re-engage in the process in 2021.

On February 1, 2018 we announced a Distribution Agreement with the Australian company, Pharmachal PTY LTD to market and distribute Nyloxin® in Australia and New Zealand. Pharmachal has begun the registration process with the TGA (Therapeutic Goods Administration). At this time, we do not know if our products will qualify for TGA registration and cannot provide a timeline for the eventual distribution in Australia.

Additionally, we plan to complete several human clinical studies aimed at comparing the ability of Nyloxin® Extra Strength to replace prescription pain relievers. We have provided protocols to several hospitals and will provide details and timelines when those protocols have been accepted. We cannot provide any timeline for these studies until adequate financing is available.

To date, our marketing efforts have been limited due to lack of funding. As sales increase, we plan to begin marketing more aggressively to increase the sales and awareness of our products.

Pet Pain-Away

During June of 2013, we announced the launch of our new homeopathic formula for the treatment of chronic pain in companion animals, Pet Pain-Away™. Pet Pain-Away™ is a homeopathic, non-narcotic, non-addictive, over-the-counter pain reliever, primarily aimed at treating moderate to severe chronic pain in companion animals. It is specifically indicated to treat pain from hip dysplasia, arthritis pain, joint pain, and general chronic pain in dogs and cats. The initial product run was completed in December of 2014 and launched through Lumaxa Distributors on December 19, 2014.

In May of 2016, we signed a license agreement to begin the process of creating an infomercial (Direct Response) campaign for Pet Pain-Away™. In November of 2016, we announced the license agreement with DEG Productions for the marketing and distribution of Pet Pain-Away globally. DEG has the ability to earn the exclusive distribution rights for the product by reaching certain sales milestones. DEG has created their own website (www.getpetpainaway.com) and began airing commercials in December of 2016.

In February of 2020, we took back the marketing of Pet Pain-Away and are currently selling the product on Amazon.com and through www.petpainaway.com.

Luxury Feet

In June of 2017 we announced the creation of Luxury Feet; an over-the-counter pain reliever and anti-inflammatory product that is designed for women who experience pain or discomfort due to high heels and stilettos. In March of 2021 we announced plans for the marketing and distribution of Luxury Feet and on April 15, 2021 we announced that the product was available for purchase on Amazon. We will continue with the marketing efforts of Luxury Feet throughout 2021 with plans to start social media campaigns and a retail rollout later in the year.

Equine Pain-Away (Formerly Equine Nyloxin)

In October of 2013, we announced that we were in the process of launching the newest addition to our line of homeopathic treatments for chronic pain, Equine Nyloxin. We had been working with trainers and veterinarians in the equine industry and have already identified distributors for the product. The Equine Nyloxin® represents the Company's first topical solution for the animal market. Equine Nyloxin was rebranded as Equine Pain-Away and officially rolled into the market in October of 2019. Equine Pain-Away is being marketed through several retailers and online at www.EquinePainAway.comand on Amazon.

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Drug Discovery and Pipeline

Nutra Pharma is developing proprietary therapeutic protein products for the biologics market. The Company has two leading drug candidates: RPI-MN and RPI-78M.

RPI-MN

RPI-MN inhibits the entry of several viruses that are known to cause severe neurological damage in such diseases as encephalitis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). It is being developed first for the treatment of HIV.

RPI-78M

RPI-78M is being developed for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN). Other neurological and autoimmune disorders that may be served by RPI-78M include Myasthenia Gravis (MG), Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

RPI-78M and RPI-MN contain anticholinergic peptides that recognize the same receptors as nicotine (acetylcholine receptors) but have the opposite effect. In a specific chemical process unique to Nutra Pharma, the drugs are created through a process of chemical modification.

In September, 2015 RPI-78M was granted Orphan Status by the FDA for the treatment of pediatric Multiple Sclerosis. This allows for much shorter timelines to drug approval, waiver of FDA fees (around $2.5M), rolling review and fast-track approval. Orphan status also allows for potential grant money and other funding opportunities through the clinical process.

RPI-MN and RPI-78M possess several desirable properties as drugs:

● They lack measurable toxicity but are still capable of attaching to and affecting the target site on the nerve cells. This means that patients cannot overdose.

● They display no serious adverse side effects following years of investigations in humans and animals.

● They are extremely stable and resistant to heat, which gives the drugs a long shelf life. The drugs' stability has been determined to be over 4 years at room temperature. This is extremely unusual for a biologic drug.

● RPI-78M may be administered orally -- a first for a biologic MS drug. This will present MS patients with additional quality of life benefits by eliminating the requirement for routine injections.

● They are easy to administer.

We are currently working with consultants to develop trial protocols for a Phase I/II trial for the use of RPI-78M in the treatment of Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis. We expect to begin the trial in FY2021.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our condensed consolidated unaudited financial statements and accompanying notes have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("GAAP") applied on a consistent basis. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods.

We regularly evaluate the accounting policies and estimates that we use to prepare our condensed consolidated financial statements. In general, management's estimates are based on historical experience, information from third party professionals, and various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates made by management under different and/or future circumstances.

We believe that our critical accounting policies and estimates include our ability to continue as a going concern, revenue recognition, accounts receivable and allowance for doubtful accounts, inventory obsolescence, accounting for long-lived assets and accounting for stock based compensation.

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Ability to Continue as a Going Concern: Our ability to continue as a going concern is contingent upon our ability to secure additional financing, increase ownership equity, and attain profitable operations. In addition, our ability to continue as a going concern must be considered in light of the problems, expenses and complications frequently encountered in established markets and the competitive environment in which we operate.

Revenue Recognition: The Company accounts for revenue from contracts with customers in accordance with Financial Accounting Standard Board ("FASB") Accounting Standard Codification ("ASC") Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers ("ASC 606"). Under ASC Topic 606, revenue recognition has a five-step process: a) Determine whether a contract exists; b) Identify the performance obligations; c) Determine the transaction price; d) Allocate the transaction price; and e) Recognize revenue when (or as) performance obligations are satisfied.

Our revenues are primarily derived from customer orders for the purchase of our products. We recognize revenues as performance obligations are fulfilled when control passes to our customers. We record revenues net of promotions and discounts. For certain product sales to a distributor, we record revenue including a portion of the cash proceeds that is remitted back to the distributor.

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Doubtful Accounts: We grant credit without collateral to our customers based on our evaluation of a particular customer's credit worthiness. Accounts receivable are due 30 days after the issuance of the invoice. In addition, allowances for doubtful accounts are maintained for potential credit losses based on the age of the accounts receivable and the results of periodic credit evaluations of our customers' financial condition. Accounts receivable are written off after collection efforts have been deemed to be unsuccessful. Accounts written off as uncollectible are deducted from the allowance for doubtful accounts, while subsequent recoveries are netted against the provision for doubtful accounts expense. We generally do not charge interest on accounts receivable. We use third party payment processors and are required to maintain reserve balances, which are included in accounts receivable.

Our accounts receivable are stated at estimated net realizable value. Accounts receivable are comprised of balances due from customers net of estimated allowances for uncollectible accounts. In determining collectability, historical trends are evaluated and specific customer issues are reviewed to arrive at appropriate allowances.

Inventory Obsolescence: Inventories are valued at the lower of average cost or market value. We periodically perform an evaluation of inventory for excess, impairments and obsolete items. At June 30, 2021, our inventory consisted entirely of raw materials and finished goods that are utilized in the manufacturing of finished goods. These raw materials generally have expiration dates in excess of 10 years. We classify inventory as short-term or long-term inventory based on timing of when it is expected to be consumed.

Long-Lived Assets: The carrying value of long-lived assets is reviewed annually and on a regular basis for the existence of facts and circumstances that may suggest impairment. If indicators of impairment are present, we determine whether the sum of the estimated undiscounted future cash flows attributable to the long-lived asset in question is less than its carrying amount. If less, we measure the amount of the impairment based on the amount that the carrying value of the impaired asset exceeds the discounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposal of the impaired assets.

Derivative Financial Instrument: Management evaluates all of its financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported as charges or credits to income. For option-based simple derivative financial instruments, the Company uses the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to value the derivative instruments at inception and subsequent valuation dates. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

We do not use derivative instruments to hedge exposures to cash flow, market, or foreign currency risks.

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Convertible Debt: For convertible debt that does not contain an embedded derivative that requires bifurcation, the conversion feature is evaluated to determine if the rate of conversion is below market value and should be categorized as a beneficial conversion feature ("BCF"). A BCF related to debt is recorded by the Company as a debt discount and with the offset recorded to equity. The related convertible debt is recorded net of the discount for the BCF. The discount is amortized as additional interest expense over the term of the debt with the resulting debt discount being accreted over the term of the note.

The Fair Value Measurement Option: We have elected the fair value measurement option for convertible debt with embedded derivatives that require bifurcation, and record the entire hybrid financing instrument at fair value under the guidance of ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging ("ASC Topic 815"). The Company reports interest expense, including accrued interest, related to this convertible debt under the fair value option, within the change in fair value of convertible notes and derivatives in the accompanying consolidated statement of operations.

Derivative Accounting for Convertible Debt and Options and Warrants: The Company evaluated the terms and conditions of the convertible debt under the guidance of ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging. The conversion terms of some of the convertible notes are variable based on certain factors, such as the future price of the Company's common stock. The number of shares of common stock to be issued is based on the future price of the Company's common stock. The number of shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of the debt is indeterminate. Due to the fact that the number of shares of common stock issuable could exceed the Company's authorized share limit, the equity environment is tainted, and all additional convertible debt and options and warrants are included in the value of the derivative liabilities. Pursuant to ASC 815-15, Embedded Derivatives, the fair values of the convertible debt, options and warrants and shares to be issued were recorded as derivative liabilities on the issuance date and revalued at each reporting period.

Share-Based Compensation: We record share-based compensation in accordance with FASB ASC 718, Stock Compensation. FASB ASC 718 requires that the cost resulting from all share-based transactions are recorded in the financial statements over the respective service periods. It establishes fair value as the measurement objective in accounting for share-based payment arrangements and requires all entities to apply a fair-value-based measurement in accounting for share-based payment transactions with employees. FASB ASC 718 also establishes fair value as the measurement objective for transactions in which an entity acquires goods or services from non-employees in share-based payment transactions.

Results of Operations - Comparison of Three Months Periods Ended June 30, 2021 and June 30, 2020

Sales for the three-month period ended June 30, 2021 were $30,459 compared to $6,240 for the three-month period ended June 30, 2020. The increase in net sales is primarily attributable to the increase in Pet Pain-Away sales.

Cost of sales for the three-month period ended June 30, 2021 is $9,006 compared to $3,685 for the three-month period June 30, 2020. Our cost of sales includes the direct costs associated with manufacturing, shipping and handling costs. Our gross profit margin for the three-month period ended June 30, 2021 is $21,453 or 70.43% compared to $2,555 or 40.95% for the three-month period ended June 30, 2020. The increase in our profit margin is primarily due to decrease in the manufacturing cost.

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $207,738 or 89.38% from $232,427 for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 to $440,165 for the quarter ended June 30, 2021, generally due to the overall increase in professional fees. In addition, we incurred bad debt expense of $20,000 from the receivables from companies owned by the Company's CEO for the three months ended June 30, 2021. We had a bad debt recovery from the receivables from companies owned by the Company's CEO for $31,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2020.

Other income of $1,715 for the three months ended June 30, 2021 is related to the amortization of debt discount from the convertible notes receivables obtained during the first and second quarter of 2021. Other income of $5,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2020 was due to the EIDL advance forgiven by SBA during June 2020.

Interest expense, including related party interest expense, increased $25,250 or 30.37%, from $83,152 for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 to $108,402 for the quarter ended June 30, 2021. This increase was primarily due to increase in amortization of loan discounts in the quarter ended June 30, 2021 compared to the quarter ended June 30, 2020.

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We carry certain of our debentures and common stock warrants at fair value. For the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the liability related to these hybrid instruments fluctuated, resulting in a gain of $3,918,817 and a loss of $1,226,465, respectively.

Loss on settlement of debts increased $11,200 or 100%, from a loss of $0 for the three months ended June 30, 2020 to a loss of $11,200 for the three months ended June 30, 2021. This increase was primarily due to increase in losses on settlement of debt through issuance of shares of common stock. Stock issued for loan modification decreased $3,000 or 100% from $3,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2020 to $0 for the three months ended June 30, 2021.

As a result of the foregoing, our net income/loss increased by $4,868,707 or 323.18%, from a loss of $1,506,489 for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 to an income of $3,362,218 for the quarter ended June 30, 2021.

Results of Operations - Comparison of Six Months Periods Ended June 30, 2021 and June 30, 2020

Sales for the six-month period ended June 30, 2021 were $52,482 compared to $23,356 for the six-month period ended June 30, 2020. The increase in net sales is primarily attributable to the increase in Pet Pain-Away sales.

Cost of sales for the six-month period ended June 30, 2021 is $14,640 compared to $8,964 for the six-month period June 30, 2020. Our cost of sales includes the direct costs associated with manufacturing, shipping and handling costs. Our gross profit margin for the six-month period ended June 30, 2021 is $37,842 or 72.10% compared to $14,392 or 61.62% for the six-month period ended June 30, 2020. The increase in our profit margin is primarily due to decrease in the manufacturing cost.

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $473,889 or 100.64% from $470,868 for the six months ended June 30, 2020 to $944,757 for the six months ended June 30, 2021, generally due to the overall increase in professional fees. In addition, we incurred bad debt expense of $73,000 from the receivables from companies owned by the Company's CEO for the six months ended June 30, 2021. We had a bad debt recovery from the receivables from companies owned by the Company's CEO for $70,500 for the six months ended June 30, 2020.

Other income of $1,715 for the six months ended June 30, 2021 is related to the amortization of debt discount from the convertible notes receivables obtained during the first and second quarter of 2021. Other income of $5,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2020 was due to the EIDL advance forgiven by SBA during June 2020.

Interest expense, including related party interest expense, increased $67,941 or 43.34%, from $156,746 for the six months ended June 30, 2020 to $224,687 for the six months ended June 30, 2021. This increase was primarily due to increase in amortization of loan discounts in the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2020.

We carry certain of our debentures and common stock warrants at fair value. For the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the liability related to these hybrid instruments fluctuated, resulting in a loss of $28,958,053 and a gain of $1,316,477, respectively.

Loss on settlement of debts increased $407,497 or 1,852.26%, from a loss of $22,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2020 to a loss of $429,497 for the six months ended June 30, 2021. This increase was primarily due to increase in losses on settlement of debt through issuance of shares of common stock. Stock issued for loan modification increased $27,300 or 34.04% from $80,200 for the six months ended June 30, 2020 to $107,500 for the six months ended June 30, 2021.

As a result of the foregoing, our net income/loss decreased by $31,374,492 or 4,637.39%, from an income of $676,555 for the six months ended June 30, 2020 to a loss of $30,697,937 for the six months ended June 30, 2021.

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

We have incurred significant losses from operations and working capital and stockholders' deficits raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Further, as stated in Note 1 to our condensed consolidated unaudited financial statements for the period ended June 30, 2021, we have an accumulated deficit of $99,331,405 at June 30, 2021. In addition, we have a significant amount of indebtedness in default, a working capital deficit of $38,362,250 and a stockholders' deficit of $39,244,098 at June 30, 2021.

Our ability to continue as a going concern is contingent upon our ability to secure additional financing, increase ownership equity, and attain profitable operations. In addition, our ability to continue as a going concern must be considered in light of the problems, expenses and complications frequently encountered in established markets and the competitive environment in which we operate. As of the date of the filing of this report, we do not believe that our source of cash is adequate for the next 12 months of operation and there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

Current operations are primarily being funded through a combination of product sales and convertible notes. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we raised $1,492,560 through the issuance of convertible notes.

We expect to utilize the proceeds from these funds and additional capital to manufacture Nyloxin® and Pet Pain-Away and reduce our debt level. We estimate that we will require approximately $200,000 quarterly to fund our existing operations and ReceptoPharm's operations for the next twelve months from the date of filing. These costs include: (i) compensation for three (3) full-time employees; (ii) compensation for various consultants who we deem critical to our business; (iii) general office expenses including rent and utilities; (iv) product liability insurance; and (v) outside legal and accounting services. These costs reflected in (i) - (v) do not include research and development costs or other costs associated with clinical studies.

We began generating revenues from the sale of Cobroxin® in the fourth quarter of 2009 and from the sale of Nyloxin® during the first quarter of 2011. We began generating revenues from the sale of Pet Pain-Away™ in the fourth quarter of 2014. Our ability to meet our future operating expenses is highly dependent on the amount of such future revenues. To the extent that future revenues from the sales of Nyloxin® and Pet Pain-Away™ are insufficient to cover our operating expenses we may need to raise additional equity capital, which could result in substantial dilution to existing shareholders. There can be no assurance that we will be able to raise sufficient equity capital to fund our working capital requirements on terms acceptable to us, or at all. We may also seek additional loans from our officers and directors; however, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in securing such additional loans.

Impact of COVID-19 on our Operations

The ramifications of the outbreak of the novel strain of COVID-19 are filled with uncertainty and changing quickly. Our operations have continued during the COVID-19 pandemic and we have not had significant disruption. Beginning in June 2020, the Company experienced a delay in retail rollout as a downstream implication of the slowing economy. We also closed our Coral Springs office in effort to save money. During May 2020, we received approval from SBA to fund our request for a PPP loan for $64,895. We used the proceeds primarily for payroll costs. We expect forgiveness of this loan under the current terms of requirement by the SBA. During April and June 2020, we obtained the loan in the amount of $150,000 from SBA under its Economic Injury Disaster Loan assistance program. We used the proceeds primarily for rent, payroll, utilities, accounting and legal expenses.

The Company is operating in a rapidly changing environment so the extent to which COVID-19 impacts its business, operations and financial results from this point forward will depend on numerous evolving factors that the Company cannot accurately predict. Those factors include the following: the duration and scope of the pandemic; governmental, business and individuals' actions that have been and continue to be taken in response to the pandemic; and the distribution of testing and a vaccine.

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Uncertainties and Trends

Our operations and possible revenues are dependent now and in the future upon the following factors:

● whether Nyloxin®, Nyloxin® Extra Strength and Pet Pain-Away will be accepted by retail establishments where they are sold;

● because Nyloxin® is a novel approach to the over-the-counter pain market, whether it will be accepted by consumers over conventional over-the-counter pain products;

● whether Nyloxin® Military Strength will be successfully launched and be accepted in the marketplace;

● whether our international drug applications will be approved and in how many countries;

● whether we will be successful in marketing Nyloxin®, Nyloxin® Extra Strength and Pet Pain-Away in our target markets and create nationwide and international visibility for our products;

● whether our drug delivery system, i.e. oral spray and gel, will be accepted by consumers who may prefer a pain pill delivery system;

● whether competitors' pain products will be found to be more attractive to consumers;

● whether we successfully develop and commercialize products from our research and development activities;

● whether we compete effectively in the intensely competitive biotechnology area;

● whether we successfully execute our planned partnering and out-licensing products or technologies;

● whether the current economic downturn and related credit and financial market crisis will adversely affect our ability to obtain financing, conduct our operations and realize opportunities to successfully bring our technologies to market;

● whether we are subject to litigation and related costs in connection with use of products;

● whether we will successfully contract with domestic distributor(s)/advertiser(s) for our products and whether that will cause interruptions in our operations;

● whether we comply with FDA and other extensive legal/regulatory requirements affecting the healthcare industry.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We have not entered into any transaction, agreement or other contractual arrangement with an entity unconsolidated with us under whom we have:

● An obligation under a guarantee contract.

● A retained or contingent interest in assets transferred to the unconsolidated entity or similar arrangement that serves as credit, liquidity or market risk support to such entity for such assets.

● Any obligation, including a contingent obligation, under a contract that would be accounted for as a derivative instrument.

● Any obligation, including a contingent obligation, arising out of a variable interest in an unconsolidated entity that is held by us and material to us where such entity provides financing, liquidity, market risk or credit risk support to, or engages in leasing, hedging or research and development services with us.

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements or commitments other than those disclosed in this report that have a current or future effect on its financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures, or capital resources that is material.

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

Not applicable

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

As of June 30, 2021, we carried out an evaluation under the supervision and the participation of our Chief Executive Officer/Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of June 30, 2021, as defined in Rule 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 ("Exchange Act"). Based on that evaluation, our management, including our Chief Executive Officer/Chief Financial Officer, concluded that, because of the material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting discussed in Section 9A of our annual report on Form 10-K, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective, at a reasonable assurance level, as of June 30, 2021. In light of this, we performed additional post-closing procedures and analyses in order to prepare the Condensed Consolidated Unaudited Financial Statements included in this report. As a result of these procedures, we believe our Condensed Consolidated Unaudited Financial Statements included in this report present fairly, in all material respects, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. A control system cannot provide absolute assurance, however, that the objectives of the controls system are met, and no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, with the company have been detected.

Disclosure controls and procedures are controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission's rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer, who also acted as our Principal Financial Officer as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting identified in connection with the evaluation required by paragraph (d) of Rule 13a-15 or 15d-15 under the Exchange Act that occurred during the quarter ended June 30, 2021 that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

Paul Reid et al. v. Nutra Pharma Corp. et al.

On August 26, 2016, certain of former ReceptoPharm employees and a former ReceptoPharm consultant filed a lawsuit in the 17th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County, Florida (Case No. CACE16-015834) against Nutra Pharma and ReceptoPharm to recover $315,000 allegedly owing to them under a settlement agreement reached in an involuntary bankruptcy action that was brought by the same individuals in 2012 and for payment of unpaid wages/breach of written debt confirms. On June 24, 2021, the parties entered into a confidential settlement agreement of the lawsuit. Nutra Pharma has fully performed under the settlement and considers the case fully resolved.

Get Credit Healthy, Inc. v. Nutra Pharma Corp. and Rik Deitsch, Case No. CACE 18-017055

On August 1, 2018, Get Credit Healthy, Inc. filed a lawsuit against Nutra Pharma Corp. and Rik Deitsch (collectively the "Defendants") in the 17th Judicial Circuit Court in and for Broward County, Florida (Case No. CACE 18-017055) to recover $100,000 allegedly owed under an amended promissory note dated April 12, 2017. Counsel for Get Credit Healthy, Inc. requested an early mediation conference in an attempt to resolve our dispute. We agreed to this request, and mediation took place on February 15, 2019. At December 31, 2018, we owed principal balance of $101,818 and accrued interest of $21,023. At mediation, Get Credit Healthy, Inc. claimed that the individual that breached the binding memorandum of understanding with Nutra Pharma Corp. was never an owner of Get Credit Healthy, Inc., but rather, a close friend that encouraged Get Credit Healthy, Inc. to make the subject loan to Nutra Pharma Corp. Ultimately, the parties were able to reach a Confidential Settlement Agreement to resolve the dispute, and an Agreed Order was entered dismissing the lawsuit. The lawsuit was settled on February 15, 2019 for $104,000 with scheduled payments through May 1, 2020. The settlement amount was further amended and repayments were made in full as of November 2020 (See Note 6).

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CSA 8411, LLC v. Nutra Pharma Corp., Case No. CACE 18-023150

On October 12, 2018, CSA 8411, LLC filed a lawsuit against the Company in the 17th Judicial Circuit Court in and for Broward County, Florida (Case No. CACE 18-023150) to recover $100,000 allegedly owed under an amended promissory note dated April 12, 2017. On November 1, 2018, the Company filed its Answer and Affirmative Defenses to the Complaint. The Company believes that this lawsuit is without merit. Moreover, the Company believes that it has a number of valid defenses to this claim. Among other things, the owner of CSA 8411, LLC violated the terms of a Binding Memorandum of Understanding by failing to invest in the Company and fraudulently inducing the Company to enter into the subject amended promissory note (contrary to the Get Credit Healthy lawsuit discussed above, we are certain that this individual is the majority owner of CSA 8411, LLC). Opposing counsel reached out to schedule mediation, and mediation was set for June 21, 2019 in Plantation, FL however the mediation was unsuccessful. At June 30, 2021, we owed principal balance of $91,156 and accrued interest of $46,342 (See Note 6) if the defenses and our new claims are deemed be of no merit.

The Company also filed affirmative claims against the Plaintiff, its owner Dan Oran and several related entities. The case has not been set for trial as of this date.

Securities and Exchange Commission v. Nutra Pharma Corporation, Erik Deitsch, and Sean Peter McManus

On September 28, 2018, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York (Case No. 2:18-cv-05459) against the Company, Mr. Deitsch, and Mr. McManus. The lawsuit alleges that, from July 2013 through June 2018, the Company and the other defendants defrauded investors by making materially false and misleading statements about t and violated anti-fraud and other securities laws.

The violations alleged against the Company by the SEC include: (a) raising over $920,000 in at least two private placement offerings for which the Company failed to file required registration statements with the SEC; (b) issuing a series of materially false or misleading press releases; (c) making false statements in at least one Form 10-Q; and (d) failing to make required public filings with the SEC to disclose the Company's issuance of millions of shares of stock. The lawsuit makes additional allegations against Mr. McManus and Mr. Deitsch, including that Mr. McManus acted as a broker without SEC registration and defrauded at least one investor by making false statements about the Company, that Mr. Deitsch engaged in manipulative trades of the Company's stock by offering to pay more for shares he was purchasing than the amount the seller was willing to take, and that Mr. Deitsch failed to make required public filings with the SEC. The lawsuit seeks both injunctive and monetary relief.

On May 29, 2019 (following each of the defendants filing motions to dismiss), the SEC filed a First Amended Complaint which generally alleged the same conduct as its original Complaint, but accounted for certain guidance provided by the United States Supreme Court in a case that had been recently decided. Each of the defendants then moved to dismiss the SEC's First Amended Complaint. On March 31, 2020, the Court entered an Order granting in part and denying in part the various motions to dismiss. Following that Order, the SEC filed a Second Amended Complaint (the operative pleading) and the defendants have filed their answers which generally deny liability. At this time, discovery is closed and the SEC has indicated an intent to file a summary judgment motion regarding certain non-fraud claims asserted in its Second Amended Complaint. The defendants have opposed the SEC's request to file such motion(s). The Court conducted a hearing on February 23, 2021 and set an initial briefing schedule for the SEC's Motion for Partial Summary Judgment wherein the Plaintiffs' Motion for Partial Summary Judgment was due on April 5, 2021, the Defendants' Consolidated (i.e., collectively, Nutra Pharma Corporation, Erik "Rik" Deitsch, and Sean McManus) Response Brief to the SEC's Motion was due May 3, 2021, and the Plaintiffs' Reply Brief was due on May 19, 2021. On March 23, 2021, the Plaintiff filed a Motion for Extension of Time to file the Motion for Partial Summary Judgment. On April 9, 2021, the Plaintiff filed a Motion for Partial Summary Judgment, Defendants' filed a Memorandum of Law in Opposition to Plaintiff's Motion on May 7, 2021, and Plaintiff filed its Reply brief on May 21, 2021. At this time the Court has not ruled on the pending Motion. Nutra Pharma disputes the allegations in this lawsuit and continues to vigorously defend against the SEC's claims. Mr. Deitsch and Mr. McManus have similarly defended the lawsuit since its filing and each contest liability. The Company does not believe that it engaged in any fraudulent activity or made any material misrepresentations concerning the Company and/or its products.

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Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

Common Stock Issued for Conversion of Convertible Debt

During April through June 2021, the Note holder received a total of 35,270,000 shares of our restricted common stock in satisfaction the $17,635 of the Note with a fair value of $243,787.

During April 2021, in connection with this settlement of the remaining balance of $8,500 of the Note of $12,000 originated in December 2018, we issued 2,000,000 shares of common stocks in satisfaction of $4,000 of the Note with a fair value of $15,200.

Common Stock Issued for Consulting Service

During June 2021, the Company signed an agreement with a consultant for services for six months for which the Company is to issue a total of 30,000,000 shares of the Company's restricted common stock. 5,000,000 of the shares were issued upon execution of the agreement and 5,000,000 shares will be issued every 30 days through November 2021. The compensation charge will be amortized over the term of the agreement. Total 15,000,000 of the shares have been issued as the date of this report.

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

Debt owed to a Director

During 2010, we borrowed $200,000 from one of our directors. Under the terms of the loan agreement, this loan was expected to be repaid in nine months to a year from the date of the loan along with interest calculated at 10% for the first month plus 12% after 30 days from funding. We are in default regarding this loan. The loan is under personal guarantee by Mr. Deitsch. We repaid principal balance in full as of December 31, 2016. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we repaid $40,000 of accrued interest in cash. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we owed this director accrued interest of $148,899 and $179,522.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

Item 5. Other Information

None

Item 6. Exhibits

Exhibit No. Title
31.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INS Inline XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
104 Cover Page Interactive Data File (embedded within the Inline XBRL document)
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SIGNATURES

In accordance with the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

NUTRA PHARMA CORP.
Registrant
Dated: September 24, 2021 /s/ Rik J. Deitsch
Rik J. Deitsch
Chief Executive Officer/Chief Financial Officer
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