Two Roads Shared Trust

12/03/2021 | Press release | Distributed by Public on 12/03/2021 13:32

Prospectus by Investment Company (Form 497)

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

(f/k/a Hanlon Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund)*

PROSPECTUS

November 30, 2021

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Class A HTDAX
Class C HTDCX
Class I HTDIX
Class R HTDRX

www.HanlonFunds.com

1-844-828-3212

This Prospectus provides important information about the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund that you should know before investing. Please read it carefully and keep it for future reference.

These securities have not been approved or disapproved by the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") nor has the SEC passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

* Before September 1, 2021, Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund was known as Hanlon Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FUND SUMMARY: TACTICAL DIVIDEND AND MOMENTUM FUND 1
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
AND RELATED RISKS
6
Investment Objective 6
Principal Investment Strategies 6
Principal and Other Risk Factors 6
Portfolio Holdings Disclosure 10
Cybersecurity 10
MANAGEMENT 11
Investment Adviser 11
Portfolio Managers 11
HOW SHARES ARE PRICED 12
HOW TO PURCHASE SHARES 13
Share Classes 13
Class A 13
Class C 14
Class I 16
Class R 16
Factors to Consider When Choosing a Share Class 16
Purchasing Shares 17
Minimum and Additional Investment Amounts 17
When Order is Processed 18
Good Order 18
Retirement Plans 18
HOW TO REDEEM SHARES 19
Redeeming Shares 19
Good Order 20
When You Need Medallion Signature Guarantees 20
Retirement Plans 20
Low Balances 20
FREQUENT PURCHASES AND REDEMPTIONS OF FUND SHARES 21
EXCHANGE PRIVILEGE 21
TAX STATUS, DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS 22
Dividends and Distributions 22
Taxes 22
Income Dividends and Capital Gains 22
Non-U.S. Persons 22
Annual Notifications 22
DISTRIBUTION OF SHARES 23
Distributor 23
Distribution Fees 23
Additional Compensation to Financial Intermediaries 23
Householding 23
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 24
PRIVACY NOTICE 28

FUND SUMMARY: Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund
(f/k/a Hanlon Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund)

Investment Objective: The Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund (the "Fund") seeks to provide capital appreciation and current income.

Fees and Expenses of the Fund: This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $25,000 in the Fund. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial intermediary and in the section entitled How to Purchase Shares on page 13 of this Fund's Prospectus and in the Statement of Additional Information ("SAI").

Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
Class A Class C Class I Class R
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases
(as a % of offering price)
5.75% None None None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) for Shares Held Less Than One Year (as a % of original purchase price) None(1) 1.00% None None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a
percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 1.00% 1.00% 1.00% 1.00%
Distribution (12b-1) and Service Fees 0.25% 1.00% None 0.40%
Other Expenses 0.43% 0.43% 0.43% 0.43%
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses(2) 0.12% 0.12% 0.12% 0.12%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 1.80% 2.55% 1.55% 1.95%
(1) There is a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge ("CDSC") for investments of $1 million or more (see "How to Purchase Shares" below) on shares sold within 1-year of purchase, unless you are otherwise eligible to purchase Class A shares without an initial sales charge or are eligible for a waiver of the CDSC (see "Waiver of Contingent Deferred Sales Charges" below).
(2) Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses are the indirect costs of investing in other investment companies. The operating expenses in this fee table will not correlate to the expense ratio in the Fund's financial highlights because the financial statements include only the direct operating expenses incurred by the Fund.

Example: This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund's operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based upon these assumptions your costs would be:

Class 1 Year 3 Years 5 Years 10 Years
A $747 $1,109 $1,494 $2,569
C $258 $793 $1,355 $2,885
I $158 $490 $845 $1,845
R $198 $612 $1,052 $2,275

Portfolio Turnover: The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or "turns over" its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the Example, affect the Fund's performance. For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Fund's portfolio turnover rate was 64% of the average value of its portfolio.

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund follows, when appropriate, a rules-based investment strategy, that includes both a sector tactical overlay and ranking selection strategy among the eleven major economic sectors in the U.S. economy. The Adviser may also exercise its discretion in applying the rules-based investment strategy, when, in its opinion, a discretionary management approach would be more appropriate. These eleven sectors include: communications services; consumer discretionary; consumer staples; energy; financials; health care; industrials; information technology; materials; real estate and utilities.

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When the tactical algorithms determine that a sector is on a "buy," the Fund may invest in any number of the highest dividend yielding and highest momentum stocks from that particular sector. Dividend yield is determined as the total of all trailing 12-month regular dividends, divided by the current market price for each stock. A ranking by dividend yield of all stocks in the sector is made and the highest dividend stocks may be selected. Momentum is determined by a proprietary factor calculation of the rate of change for each stock over the prior 64-day and prior 18-day time periods. A ranking by momentum of all stocks in the sector is made and the top momentum-based stocks may be selected. The Adviser selects the stocks as of the date of the initial investment or tactical reinvestment in the sector. The Adviser may also elect to remove or replace any number of the stocks at any time. The Adviser may also choose to invest into the entire sector by buying an exchange-traded-fund ("ETF") representing all constituent stocks of that sector that are in the S&P 500 Index or in one or more ETFs representing a portion of a sector. When a sector is on a buy, the Adviser may invest all or a portion of the allocation into that sector, up to its market cap weighting, into any combination and weighting of individual stocks or ETFs. When all eleven sectors are on a buy, the Fund may be fully invested in a combination of stocks and ETFs in each sector. Under these circumstances, the Fund will invest up to a market cap weighted amount of its assets in each of the eleven sectors. The market cap weight amount of each sector shall be determined by the percentage that the individual sector is represented in the S&P 500 Index as of the end of the previous calendar month. Under certain circumstances, the Fund may be over weighted in one or more sectors because of market appreciation or if the Adviser believes that different weightings are appropriate.

When the tactical algorithms and the Adviser, in its discretion, determines that a sector is not on a "buy," the Fund will move to a defensive position with respect to that sector, and will hold cash and/or cash equivalents instead of investing in stocks or ETFs from the sector. When none of the sectors is on a buy, the Fund will be fully defensive, meaning that all of the Fund's assets will be invested in cash and/or cash equivalents. Accordingly, the Fund may invest all or a substantial portion of its assets in cash and/or cash equivalents and may invest in a smaller number of holdings. The Fund may also seek to increase its income by lending portfolio securities to certain institutions.

Principal Investment Risks: As with all mutual funds, there is the risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not guaranteed to achieve its investment objective; is not a deposit with a bank; is not insured, endorsed or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency; and is subject to investment risks. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The Fund is not intended to be a complete investment program but rather one component of a diversified investment portfolio. Many factors affect the Fund's net asset value and performance. Each risk summarized below is a principal risk of investing in the Fund and different risks may be more significant at different times depending upon market conditions or other factors.

The following describes the risks that the Fund bears directly or indirectly through its investments in ETFs.

· Market Risk. Overall market risk may affect the value of individual instruments in which the Fund invests. The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect the Fund's performance. Factors such as domestic and foreign economic growth and market conditions, real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation, changes in interest rate levels, lack of liquidity in the bond or other markets, volatility in the equities or other securities markets or adverse investor sentiment and political events affect the securities markets. Securities markets also may experience long periods of decline in value. When the value of the Fund's investments goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value and you could lose money.

Local, state, regional, national or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and could result in decreases to the Fund's net asset value. Political, geopolitical, natural and other events, including war, terrorism, trade disputes, government shutdowns, market closures, natural and environmental disasters, epidemics, pandemics and other public health crises and related events and governments' reactions to such events have led, and in the future may lead, to economic uncertainty, decreased economic activity, increased market volatility and other disruptive effects on U.S. and global economies and markets. Such events may have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the Fund and its investments. For example, a widespread health crisis such as a global pandemic could cause substantial market volatility, exchange trading suspensions and closures, impact the ability to complete redemptions, and affect Fund performance. A health crisis may exacerbate other pre-existing political, social and economic risks. In addition, the increasing interconnectedness of markets around the world may result in many markets being affected by events or conditions in a single country or region or events affecting a single or small number of issuers.

· Management Risk. The Fund's investment strategies may not result in an increase in the value of your investment in the Fund or in overall performance equal to other similar investment vehicles having investment strategies that are similar to those of the Fund. The Adviser determines the intrinsic value of the securities the Fund holds and its assessment may be incorrect, which may result in a decline in the value of Fund shares and failure to achieve its investment objective. The Fund's portfolio managers use qualitative analyses and/or models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses or models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies. In addition, the Fund's tactical asset allocation strategy may be unsuccessful and may cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities while in a defensive position.
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· Rules-Based Strategy Risk. A rules-based investment strategy may not be successful on an ongoing basis or could contain unknown errors. In addition, the data used may be inaccurate. or the computer programming used to create a rules-based investment strategy might contain one or more errors. Moreover, during periods of increased volatility or changing market conditions the commonality of portfolio holdings and similarities between strategies of rules-based managers may amplify losses.
· Sector Risk. The risk that if the Fund invests a significant portion of its total assets in certain issuers within the same economic sector, an adverse economic, business or political development or natural or other event, including war, terrorism, natural and environmental disasters, epidemics, pandemics and other public health crises, affecting that sector may affect the value of the Fund's investments more than if the Fund's investments were not so concentrated.
· Cash Positions Risk. The Fund may hold a significant position in cash and/or cash equivalent securities. When the Fund's investment in cash or cash equivalent securities increases, the Fund may not participate in market advances or declines to the same extent that it would if the Fund were more fully invested.
· Cybersecurity Risk. There is risk to the Fund of an unauthorized breach and access to fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or the risk of an incident occurring that causes the Fund, the Fund's investment adviser, custodian, transfer agent, distributor and other service providers and financial intermediaries (the "Service Providers") to suffer data breaches, data corruption or lose operational functionality. Successful cyber-attacks or other cyber-failures or events affecting the Fund, or its Service Providers may adversely impact the Fund or its shareholders.
· Equity Risk. Equity securities are susceptible to general market fluctuations and volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. Factors that may influence the price of equity securities include developments affecting a specific company or industry, or the changing economic, political or market conditions.
o Dividend-Yielding Companies Risk. A company that has historically paid regular dividends to shareholders may decrease or eliminate dividend payments in the future, which could result in a decrease in the value of the company's stock and lower performance of the Fund.
o Momentum Investing Risk. An investment in securities with positive momentum entails investing in securities that have had above-average recent returns. These securities may experience greater price volatility than other equity securities, which may negatively impact the investment performance of the Fund.
· Focus Risk. To the extent the Fund invests a greater proportion of its assets in the securities of a smaller number of issuers, the Fund may be subject to greater volatility with respect to its investments than a fund that invests in a larger number of securities.
· Healthcare Sector Risk. The Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets directly or indirectly in securities issued by healthcare companies and, as a result, the performance of the Fund will be impacted by economic, political and regulatory risks or other occurrences associated with the healthcare industry. Healthcare companies may be significantly affected by product obsolescence, thin capitalization, limited product lines and markets, civil liability claims and legislative or regulatory activities, among other factors.
· Investment Companies and ETFs Risk. When the Fund invests in other investment companies, including ETFs, it will bear additional expenses based on its pro rata share of the other investment company's or ETF's operating expenses, including the management fees of the investment company or ETF in addition to those paid by the Fund. The risk of owning an investment company or ETF generally reflects the risks of owning the underlying investments held by the investment company or ETF. The Fund also will incur brokerage costs when it purchases and sells closed end funds and ETFs. During periods of market volatility, inverse ETFs may not perform as expected.
· Issuer-Specific Risk. The value of a specific security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and may perform worse than the market as a whole.
· Large Capitalization Risk. The risk that large cap companies may be unable to respond as quickly as smaller companies to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.
· Liquidity Risk. Liquidity risk exists when particular investments of the Fund would be difficult to purchase or sell, possibly preventing the Fund from selling such illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price, or possibly requiring the Fund to dispose of other investments at unfavorable times or prices in order to satisfy its obligations. In the past, in stressed markets, certain types of securities suffered periods of illiquidity if disfavored by the market. All of these risks may increase during periods of market turmoil, such as that experienced in 2020 with COVID-19 and could have a negative effect on the Fund's performance.
· Market Events Risk. There has been increased volatility, depressed valuations, decreased liquidity and heightened uncertainty in the financial markets during the past several years, including what was experienced in 2020. These conditions may continue, recur, worsen or spread. The U.S. government and the Federal Reserve, as well as certain foreign governments and central banks, have taken steps to support financial markets, including by keeping interest rates at historically low levels. This and other government intervention may not work as intended, particularly if the efforts are perceived by investors as being unlikely to achieve the desired results. The U.S. government and the Federal Reserve may reduce market support activities. Such reduction,
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including interest rate increases, could negatively affect financial markets generally, increase market volatility and reduce the value and liquidity of securities in which the Fund invests. Policy and legislative changes in the United States and in other countries may also continue to contribute to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the financial markets. The impact of these changes on the markets, and the practical implications for market participants, may not be fully known for some time.

· Portfolio Turnover Risk. The Fund may experience high portfolio turnover, including investments made on a shorter-term basis, which may lead to increased Fund expenses that may result in lower investment returns. A higher portfolio turnover may result in higher transactional and brokerage costs. High portfolio turnover may also result in higher short-term capital gains taxable to shareholders.
· Real Estate Securities Risk. Investments in securities of real estate companies will make the Fund more susceptible to risks associated with the ownership of real estate and with the real estate industry in general. Real estate companies may have lower trading volumes and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than the overall securities markets. The value of real estate securities may underperform other sectors of the economy or broader equity markets. Certain investments in real estate-related investments were negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
· Securities Lending Risk. The Fund may lend portfolio securities to institutions, such as banks and certain broker-dealers. The risks associated with lending portfolio securities, as with other extensions of secured credit, include, but are not limited to, possible delays in receiving additional collateral or in the recovery of the securities loaned, possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially, as well as risk of loss in the value of the collateral or the value of the investments made with the collateral. In certain market conditions, the portfolio of the Fund's securities on loan may be significant and may magnify the risk of such a loss or delay.
· Technology Securities Risk. The Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets directly or indirectly in securities issued by technology companies. Securities of technology companies may be subject to greater price volatility than securities of companies in other sectors. These securities may fall in and out of favor with investors rapidly, which may cause sudden selling and dramatically lower market prices. Technology securities also may be affected adversely by changes in technology, consumer and business purchasing patterns, government regulation and/or obsolete products or services. In addition, a rising interest rate environment tends to negatively affect technology companies.
· Volatility Risk. The Fund's investments may appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. The value of an investment in the Fund's portfolio may fluctuate due to events or factors that affect markets generally or that affect a particular investment, industry or sector. The value of an investment in the Fund's portfolio may also be more volatile than the market as a whole. This volatility may affect the Fund's net asset value per share, including by causing it to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time. Events or financial circumstances affecting individual investments, industries or sectors may increase the volatility of the Fund.

Performance: The bar chart and performance table below show the variability of the Fund's returns, which is some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund. The bar chart shows performance of the Fund's Class I shares for each calendar year since the Fund's inception. Class A, Class C, and Class R shares, which are not presented in the bar chart, would have similar returns to Class I shares because the classes are invested in the same portfolio of securities and would differ only to the extent that Class A, Class C, and Class R shares have different expenses than Class I shares. Sales loads or account fees are not reflected in the bar chart. If these amounts were reflected, returns would be less than those shown. The performance table compares the performance of the Fund over time to the performance of a broad-based market index. You should be aware that the Fund's past performance (before and after taxes) may not be an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information will be available at no cost by visiting www.HanlonFunds.com or by calling 1-844-828-3212.

Performance Bar Chart for the Calendar Year Ended December 31st

Highest Quarter: 12/31/2020 10.06%
Lowest Quarter: 12/31/2018 -12.75%

The Fund's year to date return for the period ended September 30, 2021 was: 12.38%

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Performance Table

Average Annual Total Returns

(For the year ended December 31, 2020)

One
Year
Five
Years
Since
Inception(1)
Class I Shares
Return before taxes 4.37% 4.16% 3.66%
Return after taxes on Distributions 4.37% 3.99% 3.48%
Return after taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares 2.59% 3.19% 2.79%
Class A Shares
Return before taxes -1.91% 2.68% 2.28%
Class C Shares
Return before taxes 3.26% 3.15% 2.68%
Class R Shares
Return before taxes 4.02% 3.70% 3.21%

S&P 500 Total Return Index(2)

(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)

18.40% 15.22% 15.52%
(1) The inception date of the Fund is September 9, 2015.
(2) The S&P 500 Total Return Index is an unmanaged free-float capitalization-weighted index which measures the performance of 500 large-cap common stocks actively traded in the United States. Unlike a mutual fund, an index does not reflect any trading costs or management fees. Investors cannot directly invest in an index.

Investment Adviser: Hanlon Investment Management, Inc. (the "Adviser") serves as investment adviser to the Fund.

Portfolio Managers: The Fund is managed by John J. ("Sean") Hanlon, IV, CFP®, the Founder, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer of the Adviser and George Peller, the Co-Chief Investment Officer. Mr. Hanlon has managed the Fund since its inception in September 2015 and Mr. Peller has managed the Fund since November 2018.

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares: You may purchase and redeem shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open for trading by written request, by telephone at 1-844-828-3212, or through your broker. Redemptions will be paid by automated clearing house funds ("ACH"), check or wire transfer. The Fund or its Adviser may waive any of the minimum initial and subsequent investment amounts.


Class
Minimum Investment
Initial Subsequent
A $2,500 $500
C $2,500 $500
I $100,000 $500
R $2,500 $500

Tax Information: Dividends and capital gain distributions you receive from the Fund, whether you reinvest your distributions in additional Fund shares or receive them in cash, are generally taxable to you at either ordinary income or capital gains tax rates unless you are investing through a tax-deferred plan such as an IRA or 401(k) plan.

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries: If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies, including the Adviser, may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary's website for more information.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RELATED RISKS

This section provides more detailed information about the investment objectives, principal investment strategies and certain risks of investing in the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund (the "Fund") This section also provides information regarding the Fund's disclosure of portfolio holdings.

Investment Objective: The Fund seeks to provide capital appreciation and current income. The Fund's investment objective may be changed by the Fund's Board of Trustees upon 60 days' prior written notice to shareholders.

Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund follows, when appropriate, a rules-based investment strategy, that includes both a sector tactical overlay and ranking selection strategy among the ten major economic sectors in the U.S. economy. The Adviser may also exercise its discretion in applying the rules-based investment strategy, when, in its opinion, a discretionary management approach would be more appropriate. These eleven sectors include: communications services; consumer discretionary; consumer staples; energy; financials; health care; industrials; information technology; materials; real estate and utilities.

When the tactical algorithms determine that a sector is on a "buy," the Fund may invest in any number of the highest dividend yielding and highest momentum stocks from that particular sector. Dividend yield is determined as the total of all trailing 12-month regular dividends, divided by the current market price for each stock. A ranking by dividend yield of all stocks in the sector is made and the highest dividend stocks may be selected. Momentum is determined by a proprietary factor calculation of the rate of change for each stock over the prior 64 day and prior 18 day time periods. A ranking by momentum of all stocks in the sector is made and the top momentum-based stocks may be selected. The Adviser selects the stocks as of the date of the initial investment or tactical reinvestment in the sector. The Adviser may also elect to remove or replace any number of the stocks at any time. When a sector is on a buy, the Adviser may invest all or a portion of the allocation into that sector, up to its market cap weighting, into any combination and weighting of individual stocks or Exchange Traded Funds ("ETFs"). When all eleven sectors are on a buy, the Fund may be fully invested in a combination of stocks and ETFs in each sector. Under these circumstances, the Fund will invest up to a market cap weighted amount of its assets in each of the eleven sectors. The market cap weight amount of each sector shall be determined by the percentage that the individual sector is represented in the S&P 500 Index as of the end of the previous calendar month. Under certain circumstances, the Fund may be over weighted in one or more sectors because of market appreciation or if the Adviser believes that different weightings are appropriate. The Adviser may also choose to invest into the entire sector by buying an ETF representing all constituent stocks of that sector that are in the S&P 500 Index or in one or more ETFs representing a portion of a sector.

When the tactical algorithms and the Adviser, in its discretion, determines that a sector is not on a "buy," the Fund will move to a defensive position with respect to that sector, and will hold cash and/or cash equivalents instead of investing in stocks or ETFs from the sector. When none of the sectors is on a buy, the Fund will be fully defensive, meaning that all of the Fund's assets will be invested in cash and/or cash equivalents. Accordingly, the Fund may invest all or a substantial portion of its assets in cash and/or cash equivalents and may invest in a smaller number of holdings. The Fund may also seek to increase its income by lending portfolio securities to certain institutions.

Principal and Other Risk Factors

As with all funds, there is the risk that you could lose money through your investment in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not guaranteed to achieve its investment objective; is not a deposit with a bank; is not insured, endorsed or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency; and is subject to investment risks. The Adviser cannot guarantee that the Fund will achieve its objectives. The value of your investment in the Fund, as well as the amount of return you receive on your investment, may fluctuate significantly. You may lose part or all of your investment in the Fund or your investment may not perform as well as other similar investments. The Fund is not intended to be a complete investment program but rather one component of a diversified investment portfolio. Many factors affect the Fund's net asset value and performance. It is important that investors closely review and understand these risks before making an investment in the Fund. Additional information regarding the principal and certain other risks of investing in the Fund is provided below. The Fund's Statement of Additional Information ("SAI"), which is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus, includes more information about the Fund and its investments and risks. The risks described in this Prospectus (and in the SAI) are not intended to include every potential risk of investing in the Fund. The Fund could be subject to additional risks because the types of investments it makes may change over time.

The following section provides additional information regarding certain of the principal risks identified under "Principal Risk Factors" in the Fund's summary along with additional risk information. The Fund may be subject to the risks described below through its own direct investments and indirectly through investments in ETFs.

Cash Positions Risk

The Fund may hold a significant position in cash, cash equivalent securities and U.S. Treasury investments. When the Fund's investment in cash, cash equivalent securities or U.S. Treasury investment increases, the Fund may not participate in market advances or declines to the same extent that it would if the Fund were more fully invested.

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Cybersecurity Risk

There is risk to the Fund of an unauthorized breach and access to fund assets, customer data (including private shareholder information), or proprietary information, or the risk of an incident occurring that causes the Fund or its Service Providers to suffer data breaches, data corruption or lose operational functionality. Successful cyber-attacks or other cyber-failures or events affecting the Fund, or its Service Providers may adversely impact the Fund or its shareholders. Because information technology ("IT") systems and digital data underlie most of the Fund's operations, the Fund and its Service Providers are exposed to the risk that their operations and data may be compromised as a result of internal and external cyber-failures, breaches or attacks ("Cyber Risk"). This could occur as a result of malicious or criminal cyber-attacks. Cyber-attacks include actions taken to: (i) steal or corrupt data maintained online or digitally,
(ii) gain unauthorized access to or release confidential information, (iii) shut down the Fund or Service Provider website through denial-of-service attacks, or (iv) otherwise disrupt normal business operations. Events arising from human error, faulty or inadequately implemented policies and procedures or other systems failures unrelated to any external cyber-threat may have effects similar to those caused by deliberate cyber-attacks. See "Cybersecurity" below for additional risks related to potential cybersecurity breaches.

Equity Risk

Equity securities are susceptible to general market fluctuations and volatile increases and decreases in value as market confidence in and perceptions of their issuers change. Factors that may influence the price of equity securities include developments affecting a specific company or industry, or the changing economic, political or market conditions.

· Dividend-Yielding Companies Risk. A company that has historically paid regular dividends to shareholders may decrease or eliminate dividend payments in the future, which could result in a decrease in the value of the company's stock and lower performance of the Fund.
· Momentum Investing Risk. An investment in securities with positive momentum entails investing in securities that have had above-average recent returns. These securities may experience greater price volatility than other equity securities, which may negatively impact the investment performance of the Fund.

Focus Risk

To the extent the Fund invests a greater proportion of its assets in the securities of a smaller number of issuers, the Fund may be subject to greater volatility with respect to its investments than a fund that invests in a larger number of securities.

Healthcare Sector Risk

The Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets directly or indirectly in securities issued by healthcare companies and, as a result, the performance of the Fund will be impacted by economic, political and regulatory risks or other occurrences associated with the healthcare industry. Healthcare companies may be significantly affected by product obsolescence, thin capitalization, limited product lines and markets, civil liability claims and legislative or regulatory activities, among other factors.

Investment Companies and Exchange-Traded Funds ("ETFs") Risk

When the Fund invest in other investment companies, including ETFs, they will bear additional expenses based on the Fund's pro rata share of the other investment company's or ETF's operating expenses, including the management fees of the investment company or ETF in addition to those paid by the Fund. In addition, the risk of owning shares of another investment company or an ETF generally reflects the risks of owning the underlying investments such investment company or ETF holds. The Fund also will incur brokerage costs when it purchases and sells closed-end funds and ETFs. In addition, the market value of shares of ETFs or closed end funds may differ from their net asset value. Accordingly, there may be times when closed-end fund or ETF shares trade at a premium or discount to net asset value. For ETFs, this difference in price may be due to the fact that the supply and demand in the market for fund shares at any point in time is not always identical to the supply and demand in the market for the underlying basket of securities. Accordingly, there may be times when ETF shares trade at a premium or discount to net asset value.

Issuer-Specific Risk

The value of a specific security can be more volatile than the market as a whole and may perform worse than the market as a whole. The value of large cap securities, as represented by the S&P 500 Index, can be more volatile than smaller cap securities due to differing market reactions to adverse issuer, political, regulatory, market, or economic developments.

Large Capitalization Risk

Large capitalization companies may be unable to respond as quickly as smaller companies to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.

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Liquidity Risk

There is risk that the Fund may not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the time periods described in this Prospectus because of unusual market conditions, an unusually high volume of redemption requests, legal restrictions impairing its ability to sell particular securities or close derivative positions at an advantageous market price or other reasons. Certain portfolio securities may be less liquid than others, which may make them difficult or impossible to sell at the time and the price that the Fund would like or difficult to value. The Fund may have to lower the price, sell other securities instead or forgo an investment opportunity. In addition, less liquid securities may be more difficult to value and markets may become less liquid when there are fewer interested buyers or sellers or when dealers are unwilling or unable to make a market for certain securities. Recently, dealers have generally been less willing to make markets for fixed income securities. Any of these events could have a negative effect on fund management or performance. Funds with principal investment strategies that involve investments in securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations, foreign securities, Rule 144A securities, derivatives or securities with substantial market and/or credit risk tend to have the greatest exposure to liquidity risk. All of these risks may increase during periods of market turmoil, such as that experienced in 2020 with COVID-19, and could have a negative effect on the Fund's performance.

Management Risk

The Fund's investment strategies may not result in an increase in the value of your investment in the Fund or in overall performance equal to other similar investment vehicles having similar investment strategies to those of the Fund. The net asset value of the Fund changes daily based on the performance of the securities and derivatives in which it invests. The Adviser's judgments about the attractiveness, value and potential appreciation of particular securities and derivatives in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect and may not produce the desired results. The Fund's portfolio managers use qualitative analyses and/or models. Any imperfections or limitations in such analyses or models could affect the ability of the portfolio managers to implement strategies. In addition, the Fund's tactical asset allocation strategy may be unsuccessful and may cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities while in a defensive position. Additionally, the Adviser may have conflicts of interest that could interfere with its management of the Fund's portfolio. For example, the Adviser or its affiliates may manage other investment funds or have other clients that may be similar to, or overlap with, the investment objective and strategy of the Fund, creating potential conflicts of interest when making decisions regarding which investments may be appropriate for the Fund and other clients. Further information regarding conflicts of interest is available in the SAI.

Market Events Risk

There has been increased volatility, depressed valuations, decreased liquidity and heightened uncertainty in the financial markets during the past several years, including what was experienced in 2020. These conditions are an inevitable part of investing in capital markets and may continue, recur, worsen or spread. The U.S. government and the Federal Reserve, as well as certain foreign governments and central banks, have taken steps to support financial markets, including by keeping interest rates at historically low levels. This and other government intervention may not work as intended, particularly if the efforts are perceived by investors as being unlikely to achieve the desired results. The U.S. government and the Federal Reserve may reduce market support activities. Such reduction, including interest rate increases, could negatively affect financial markets generally, increase market volatility and reduce the value and liquidity of securities in which the Fund invests. Policy and legislative changes in the United States and in other countries may also continue to contribute to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the financial markets. The impact of these changes on the markets, and the practical implications for market participants, may not be fully known for some time. COVID-19 has resulted in travel restrictions, closed international borders, enhanced health screenings at ports of entry and elsewhere, disruption of and delays in healthcare service preparation and delivery, prolonged quarantines, cancellations, business and school closings, supply chain disruptions, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty. The impact of COVID-19, and other infectious illness outbreaks that may arise in the future, could adversely affect the economies of many nations or the entire global economy, individual issuers and capital markets in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen.

Market Risk

Overall market risk may affect the value of individual instruments in which the Fund invests. The Fund is subject to the risk that the securities markets will move down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based on overall economic conditions and other factors, which may negatively affect the Fund's performance. Factors such as domestic and foreign (non-U.S.) economic growth and market conditions, real or perceived adverse economic or political conditions, inflation, changes in interest rate levels, lack of liquidity in the bond and other markets, volatility in the securities markets, adverse investor sentiment affect the securities markets and political events affect the securities markets. Securities markets also may experience long periods of decline in value. When the value of the Fund's investments goes down, your investment in the Fund decreases in value and you could lose money.

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Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities, although under certain market conditions fixed income securities may have comparable or greater price volatility. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may decline in value simultaneously. Adverse market conditions may be prolonged and may not have the same impact on all types of securities. Different sectors of the market and different security types may react differently to such developments. Changes in value may be temporary or may last for extended periods. The Fund may experience a substantial or complete loss on any individual security. Even when securities markets perform well, there is no assurance that the investments held by the Fund will increase in value along with the broader market. Market factors, such as the demand for particular portfolio securities, may cause the price of certain portfolio securities to fall while the prices of other securities rise or remain unchanged.

Local, state, regional, national or global events such as war, acts of terrorism, the spread of infectious illness or other public health issues, recessions, or other events could have a significant impact on the Fund and its investments and could result in decreases to the Fund's net asset value. Political, geopolitical, natural and other events, including war, terrorism, trade disputes, government shutdowns, market closures, natural and environmental disasters, epidemics, pandemics and other public health crises and related events and governments' reactions to such events have led, and in the future may lead, to economic uncertainty, decreased economic activity, increased market volatility and other disruptive effects on U.S. and global economies and markets. Such events may have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the Fund and its investments. For example, a widespread health crisis such as a global pandemic could cause substantial market volatility, exchange trading suspensions and closures, impact the ability to complete redemptions, and affect Fund performance. A health crisis may exacerbate other pre-existing political, social and economic risks. In addition, the increasing interconnectedness of markets around the world may result in many markets being affected by events or conditions in a single country or region or events affecting a single or small number of issuers.

Portfolio Turnover Risk

The Fund may experience high portfolio turnover, including investments made on a shorter-term basis, which may lead to increased Fund expenses that may result in lower investment returns. A higher portfolio turnover may result in higher transactional and brokerage costs. High portfolio turnover may also result in higher short-term capital gains taxable to shareholders.

Real Estate Securities Risk

Investments in securities of real estate companies will make the Fund more susceptible to risks associated with the ownership of real estate and with the real estate industry in general. Real estate companies may have lower trading volumes and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements than the overall securities markets. The value of real estate securities may underperform other sectors of the economy or broader equity markets. Certain investments in real estate-related investments were negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Rules-Based Strategy Risk

A "rules-based" strategy is a methodology based on a systematic approach. Its investment performance may differ significantly from the performance of any index against which its performance may be compared. Further, the data used to implement a rules-based strategy may be inaccurate and/or it may not include the most recent information about a company or a security. In addition, computer programming used to create a rules-based investment strategy, or the data on which such strategies operate, might contain one or more errors. Such errors might never be detected or might be detected only after the Fund has sustained a loss (or reduced performance) related to such errors. Moreover, an increasing number of market participants may rely on rules-based investment strategies that are similar to those used by the Adviser, which may result in a substantial number of market participants taking the same action with respect to an investment. Should one or more of these other market participants begin to divest themselves of one or more portfolio holdings, the Fund could suffer significant losses. In addition, changes in underlying market conditions can adversely affect the performance of a rules-based investment strategy.

Sector Risk

The risk that if the Fund invests a significant portion of its total assets in certain issuers within the same economic sector, an adverse economic, business or political development or natural or other event, including war, terrorism, natural and environmental disasters, epidemics, pandemics and other public health crises, affecting that sector may affect the value of the Fund's investments more than if the Fund's investments were not so concentrated. Securities within the same group of industries may decline in price due to sector-specific market or economic developments.

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Securities Lending Risk

The Fund may seek to increase its income by lending portfolio securities to institutions, such as banks and certain broker-dealers. Portfolio security loans are secured continuously by collateral maintained on a current basis at an amount equal to at least 102% of the current market value of the loaned domestic securities (105% of loaned foreign securities) by marking to market daily. The value of the securities loaned by the Fund will not exceed 331/3% of the value of the Fund's total assets. The collateral the Fund receives will generally take the form of cash, U.S. Government securities, letters of credit, or other collateral as deemed appropriate by the Adviser. The Fund may use any cash collateral it receives to invest in short-term investments, including money market funds. It is the Trust's policy to obtain additional collateral from or return excess collateral to the borrower by the end of the next business day. Therefore, from time to time the value of the collateral received by the Fund may be less than the value of the securities on loan. The Fund will receive income earned on the securities loaned during the lending period and a portion of the interest or rebate earned on the collateral received. The risks associated with lending portfolio securities, as with other extensions of secured credit, include, but are not limited to, possible delays in receiving additional collateral or in the recovery of the securities loaned, possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially, as well as risk of loss in the value of the collateral or the value of the investments made with the collateral. In certain market conditions, the portfolio of the Fund's securities on loan may be significant and may magnify the risk of such a loss or delay. Any gain or loss in the market price of the securities loaned that might occur during the term of the loan would be for the account of the Fund.

Technology Securities Risk

The Fund may invest a substantial portion of its assets directly or indirectly in securities issued by technology companies. Securities of technology companies may be subject to greater price volatility than securities of companies in other sectors. These securities may fall in and out of favor with investors rapidly, which may cause sudden selling and dramatically lower market prices. Technology securities also may be affected adversely by changes in technology, consumer and business purchasing patterns, government regulation and/or obsolete products or services. In addition, a rising interest rate environment tends to negatively affect technology companies.

Volatility Risk

The Fund's investments may appreciate or decrease significantly in value over short periods of time. The value of an investment in the Fund's portfolio may fluctuate due to events or factors that affect markets generally or that affect a particular investment, industry or sector. The value of an investment in the Fund's portfolio may also be more volatile than the market as a whole. This volatility may affect the Fund's net asset value per share, including by causing it to experience significant increases or declines in value over short periods of time. Events or financial circumstances affecting individual investments, industries or sectors may increase the volatility of the Fund.

PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS DISCLOSURE

A description of the Fund's policies regarding the release of portfolio holdings information is available in the Fund's Statement of Additional Information ("SAI"). Shareholders may request portfolio holdings schedules at no charge by calling 1-844-828-3212.

CYBERSECURITY

The computer systems, networks and devices used by the Fund and its Service Providers to carry out routine business operations employ a variety of protections designed to prevent damage or interruption from computer viruses, network failures, computer and telecommunication failures, infiltration by unauthorized persons and security breaches. Despite the various protections utilized by the Fund and its Service Providers, systems, networks, or devices potentially can be breached. The Fund and its shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result of a cybersecurity breach. The Fund and the Adviser have limited ability to prevent or mitigate cybersecurity incidents affecting its Service Providers.

Cybersecurity breaches can include unauthorized access to systems, networks, or devices; infection from computer viruses or other malicious software code; and attacks that shut down, disable, slow, or otherwise disrupt operations, business processes, or website access or functionality. Cybersecurity breaches may cause disruptions and impact the Fund's business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses; interference with the Fund's ability to calculate its net asset value; impediments to trading; the inability of the Fund and its Service Providers to transact business; prevention of Fund investors from purchasing, redeeming or exchanging shares or receiving distributions; violations of applicable privacy and other laws; regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs; as well as the inadvertent release of confidential information.

Similar adverse consequences could result from cybersecurity breaches affecting issuers of securities in which the Fund invests; counterparties with which the Fund engage in transactions; governmental and other regulatory authorities; exchange and other financial market operators, banks, brokers, dealers, insurance companies, and other financial institutions (including financial intermediaries and service providers for the Fund's shareholders); and other parties. In addition, substantial costs may be incurred by these entities in order to prevent any cybersecurity breaches in the future.

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MANAGEMENT

Investment Adviser

Hanlon Investment Management, Inc. serves as the investment adviser to the Fund. Its principal offices are located at 3393 Bargaintown Road, Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234. The Adviser is an SEC-registered independent investment management firm founded in 1999 and has approximately $668 million in assets under management as of July 31, 2021. Subject to the supervision of the Fund's Board of Trustees, the Adviser is responsible for managing the Fund's investments, executing transactions and providing related administrative services and facilities under an Investment Advisory Agreement between the Fund and the Adviser.

The Adviser has entered into an advisory agreement with the Fund, whereby the Adviser is entitled to receive an annual fee equal to 1.00% of the Fund's average daily net assets. For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the aggregate fees paid to the Adviser were 1.00% of the Fund's average daily net assets. In addition to investment advisory fees, the Fund pays other expenses including costs incurred in connection with the maintenance of its securities law registration, printing and mailing prospectuses and Statements of Additional Information to shareholders, certain financial accounting services, taxes or governmental fees, custodial, transfer and shareholder servicing agent costs, expenses of outside counsel and independent accountants, preparation of shareholder reports and expenses of trustee and shareholders meetings.

The Adviser has contractually agreed to reduce the Fund's fees and/or absorb expenses of the Fund until at least November 28, 2022 to ensure that total annual Fund operating expenses (exclusive of (i) any front-end or contingent deferred loads; (ii) brokerage fees and commissions, (iii) acquired fund fees and expenses; (iv) borrowing costs (such as interest and dividend expense on securities sold short); (v) taxes; and (vi) extraordinary expenses, such as litigation expenses) do not exceed 1.70%, 2.45%, 1.45%, and 1.85% of average daily net assets attributable to Class A, Class C, Class I, and Class R shares, respectively. This agreement may be terminated with respect to the Fund by the Board of Trustees on 60 days' written notice to the Adviser. These fee waivers and expense reimbursements are subject to possible recoupment from the Fund in future years on a rolling three-year basis (within the three years of when the amount has been waived or reimbursed) if such recoupment can be achieved within the foregoing expense limits as well as any expense limitation that was in effect at the time the waiver or reimbursement was made.

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees' approval of the Investment Advisory Agreement is available in the Fund's annual shareholder report dated July 31, 2021.

Portfolio Managers

John J. ("Sean") Hanlon, IV, CFP®

Sean Hanlon, CFP®, founded Hanlon Investment Management, Inc. in 1999 and currently serves as Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Investment Officer. He serves on the Board of Trustees of the Stevens Institute of Technology, where he is Chairman of the Investment Committee and a member of the Finance Committee. He is also Chairman of the Advisory Board for the Stevens Financial Systems Center. Mr. Hanlon earned a Bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the Stevens Institute of Technology in 1980.

George Peller

George Peller joined the Adviser in 2013 as a Research Associate. Along with his current role as Co-Chief Investment Officer, he also oversees the daily operations of the Hanlon Research Team. He has over 10 years of investment experience, including six and a half years at BlackRock as a member of the Alternative Investments team and two years at Wells Fargo. George graduated with honors, Cum Laude, from La Salle University in 2003 with a major in Finance and a minor in Risk Management and Insurance.

The SAI provides additional information about each Portfolio Manager's compensation, other accounts managed by each Portfolio Manager and each Portfolio Manager's ownership of securities in the Fund.

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HOW SHARES ARE PRICED

The net asset value ("NAV") and offering price (NAV plus any applicable sales charges) of each class of shares is determined at 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) on each day the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") is open for business. NAV is computed by determining, on a per class basis, the aggregate market value of all assets of the Fund, less its liabilities, divided by the total number of shares outstanding ((assets - liabilities)/number of shares = NAV). The NYSE is closed on weekends and New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. The NAV takes into account, on a per class basis, the expenses and fees of the Fund, including management, administration, and distribution fees, which are accrued daily. The determination of NAV for a share class for a particular day is applicable to all applications for the purchase of shares, as well as all requests for the redemption of shares, received by the Fund (or an authorized broker or agent, or its authorized designee) before the close of trading on the NYSE on that day.

Generally, the Fund's securities are valued each day at the last quoted sales price on each security's primary exchange. Securities traded or dealt in upon one or more securities exchanges (whether domestic or foreign) for which market quotations are readily available and not subject to restrictions against resale shall be valued at the last quoted sales price on the primary exchange or, in the absence of a sale on the primary exchange, at the mean of the last bid and ask price on the primary exchange. Securities primarily traded in the National Association of Securities Dealers' Automated Quotation System ("NASDAQ") National Market System for which market quotations are readily available shall be valued using the NASDAQ Official Closing Price. Securities that are not traded or dealt in any securities exchange (whether domestic or foreign) and for which over-the-counter market quotations are readily available generally shall be valued at the last sale price or, in the absence of a sale, at the mean between the current bid and ask price on such over-the- counter market. Debt securities not traded on an exchange may be valued at prices supplied by a pricing agent(s) based on broker or dealer supplied valuations or matrix pricing, a method of valuing securities by reference to the value of other securities with similar characteristics, such as rating, interest rate and maturity.

If market quotations are not readily available, securities will be valued at their fair market value as determined in good faith by the Adviser in accordance with procedures approved by the Board and evaluated by the Board as to the reliability of the fair value method used. In these cases, the Fund's NAV will reflect certain portfolio securities' fair value rather than their market price. Fair value pricing involves subjective judgments and it is possible that the fair value determined for a security is materially different than the value that could be realized upon the sale of that security. The fair value prices can differ from market prices when they become available or when a price becomes available. The Board has delegated execution of these procedures to a fair value committee composed of one or more officers from each of the (i) Fund's management, (ii) administrator, and (iii) Adviser. The fair value committee may also enlist third-party consultants such as an audit firm or financial officer of a security issuer on an as-needed basis to assist in determining a security-specific fair value. The Board reviews and considers the determinations reached by the fair value committee in ratifying the fair value committee's application of the fair valuation methodologies employed.

The Fund may use independent pricing services to assist in calculating the fair market value of the Fund's securities. In addition, market prices for foreign (non-U.S.) securities are not determined at the same time of day as the NAV for the Fund. To the extent the Fund invests in ETFs that hold portfolio securities primarily listed on foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges, the value of some of the Fund's portfolio securities may change on days when you may not be able to buy or sell Fund shares because these exchanges may trade on weekends or other days when the underlying ETFs do not price their shares.

In computing the NAV, the Fund values foreign (non-U.S.) securities held by the Fund at the latest closing price on the exchange in which they are traded immediately prior to closing of the NYSE. Prices of foreign (non-U.S.) securities quoted in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies are translated into U.S. dollars at current rates. If events materially affecting the value of a security in the Fund's portfolio, particularly foreign (non-U.S.) securities, occur after the close of trading on a foreign (non-U.S.) market but before the Fund prices its shares, the security will be valued at fair value. For example, if trading in a portfolio security is halted and does not resume before the Fund calculates its NAV, the Adviser may need to price the security using the Fund's fair value pricing guidelines. Without a fair value price, short-term traders could take advantage of the arbitrage opportunity and dilute the NAV of long-term investors. Fair valuation of the Fund's portfolio securities can serve to reduce arbitrage opportunities available to short-term traders, but there is no assurance that fair value pricing policies will prevent dilution of the Fund's NAV by short term traders. The determination of fair value involves subjective judgments. As a result, using fair value to price a security may result in a price materially different from the prices used by other mutual funds to determine NAV, or from the price that may be realized upon the actual sale of the security.

With respect to any portion of the Fund's assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies registered under the 1940 Act, the Fund's net asset value is calculated based upon the net asset values of those open-end management investment companies, and the prospectuses for these companies explain the circumstances under which those companies will use fair value pricing and the effects of using fair value pricing.

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HOW TO PURCHASE SHARES

Share Classes: This Prospectus describes four classes of shares offered by the Fund: Class A, Class C, Class I, and Class R. The Fund offers these four classes of shares so that you can choose the class that best suits your investment needs. Refer to the information below to help you make your investment decision. The main differences between each class are sales charges, ongoing fees and minimum investment requirements. In choosing which class of shares to purchase, you should consider which will be most beneficial to you, given the amount of your purchase and the length of time you expect to hold the shares. For information on ongoing distribution fees, see the section entitled Distribution Fees in this Prospectus. Each class of shares in the Fund represents an interest in the same portfolio of investments within the Fund. There is no investment minimum on reinvested distributions, and the Fund may change investment minimums at any time. The Fund reserves the right to waive sales charges, as described below. The Fund and the Adviser may each waive investment minimums at their individual discretion. All share classes may not be available for purchase in all states.

Class A

Class A shares are offered at their public offering price, which is NAV plus the applicable sales charge, and are subject to 12b-1 distribution fees of up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets of Class A shares. The minimum initial investment in Class A shares of the Fund is $2,500 for all accounts. The minimum subsequent investment in Class A shares of the Fund is $500 for all accounts. The sales charge varies, depending on how much you invest. There are no sales charges on reinvested distributions. The following sales charges, which may be waived in the Adviser's discretion, apply to your purchases of Class A shares of the Fund:

Amount Invested

Sales Charge as a %

of Offering Price(1)

Sales Charge as a %

of Amount Invested

Dealer

Reallowance

Under $25,000 5.75% 6.10% 5.00%
$25,000 to $49,999 5.00% 5.26% 4.25%
$50,000 to $99,999 4.75% 4.99% 4.00%
$100,000 to $249,999 3.75% 3.83% 3.25%
$250,000 to $499,999 2.50% 2.56% 2.00%
$500,000 to $999,999 2.00% 2.04% 1.75%
$1,000,000 and above(2) 0.00% 0.00% See below
(1) Offering price includes the front-end sales load. The sales charge you pay may differ slightly from the amount set forth above because of rounding that occurs in the calculation used to determine your sales charge.
(2) A selling broker may receive commissions on purchases of Class A shares over $1 million calculated as follows: 1.00% on purchases equal to or greater than $1 million but less than $3 million, 0.50% on amounts equal to or greater than $3 million but less than $5 million, and 0.25% on amounts equal to or greater than $5 million. The commission rate is determined based on the purchase amount combined with the current market value of existing investments in Class A shares.

As shown, investors that purchase $1,000,000 or more of the Fund's Class A shares will not pay any initial sales charge on the purchase. However, purchases of $1,000,000 or more of Class A shares may be subject to a contingent deferred sales charge ("CDSC") on shares redeemed within the first year after their purchase in the amount of the commissions paid on the shares redeemed. The Class A CDSC does not apply if you are otherwise eligible to purchase Class A shares without an initial sales charge or are eligible for a waiver of the CDSC. See "Waiver of Contingent Deferred Sales Charges" below.

How to Reduce Your Sales Charge

You may be eligible to purchase Class A shares at a reduced sales charge. To qualify for these reductions, you must notify the Fund's distributor, Northern Lights Distributors, LLC (the "Distributor"), in writing and supply your account number at the time of purchase.

Rights of Accumulation: To qualify for the lower sales charge rates that apply to larger purchases of Class A shares, you may combine your new purchases of Class A shares with Class A shares of the Fund that you already own where you have paid the applicable sales charge for that prior purchase. The applicable initial sales charge for the new purchase is based on the total of your current purchase and the current value of all other Class A shares that you own where you have paid the applicable sales charge for that prior purchase. The reduced sales charge will apply only to current purchases and must be requested in writing when you buy your shares.

Shares of the Fund are held as follows and cannot be combined with your current purchase for purposes of reduced sales charges:

·Shares held indirectly through financial intermediaries other than your current purchase broker-dealer (for example, a different broker-dealer, a bank, a separate insurance company account or an investment advisor);

·Shares held through an administrator or trustee/custodian of an Employer Sponsored Retirement Plan (for example, a 401(k) plan) other than employer-sponsored IRAs;

·Shares held directly in the Fund account on which the broker-dealer (financial advisor) of record is different than your current purchase broker-dealer.

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Letter of Intent: Under a Letter of Intent ("LOI"), you commit to purchase a specified dollar amount of Class A shares of the Fund, with a minimum of $25,000, during a 13-month period. At your written request, Class A shares purchases made during the previous 90 days may be included. The amount you agree to purchase determines the initial sales charge you pay. If the full-face amount of the LOI is not invested by the end of the 13-month period, your account will be adjusted to the higher initial sales charge level for the amount actually invested. You are not legally bound by the terms of your LOI to purchase the amount of your shares stated in the LOI. The LOI does, however, authorize the Fund to hold in escrow 5% of the total amount you intend to purchase. If you do not complete the total intended purchase at the end of the 13-month period, the Fund's transfer agent will redeem the necessary portion of the escrowed shares to make up the difference between the reduced rate sales charge (based on the amount you intended to purchase) and the sales charge that would normally apply (based on the actual amount you purchased).

Repurchase of Class A Shares: If you have redeemed Class A shares of the Fund within the past 120 days, you may repurchase an equivalent amount of Class A shares of the Fund at NAV, without the normal front-end sales charge. In effect, this allows you to reacquire shares that you may have had to redeem, without repaying the front-end sales charge. You may exercise this privilege only once and must notify the Fund that you intend to do so in writing. The Fund must receive your purchase order within 120 days of your redemption. Note that if you reacquire shares through separate installments (e.g., through monthly or quarterly repurchases), the sales charge waiver will only apply to those portions of your repurchase order received within 120 days of your redemption.

Sales Charge Waivers

The sales charge on purchases of Class A shares is waived for certain types of investors, including:

·Current and retired directors and officers of any Fund sponsored by the Adviser or any of its subsidiaries, and their families (e.g., spouse, children, mother or father).

·Employees of the Adviser and their families, or any full-time employee or registered representative of the Distributor or of broker-dealers having dealer agreements with the Distributor (a "Selling Broker") and their immediate families (or any trust, pension, profit sharing or other benefit plan for the benefit of such persons).

·Participants in certain "wrap-fee" or asset allocation programs or other fee-based arrangements sponsored by broker-dealers and other financial institutions that have entered into agreements with the Distributor.

·Participants who have made purchases through a no-load network or platform that may or may not charge transaction fees for such purchases.

·Any purchases by clients of the Adviser or purchases referred through the Adviser.

The Fund does not waive sales charges for the reinvestment of proceeds from the sale of shares of a different fund where those shares were subject to a front-end sales charge (sometimes called an "NAV transfer"). Whether a sales charge waiver is available for your retirement plan or charitable account depends upon the policies and procedures of your intermediary. Please consult your financial adviser for further information.

Class C

Class C shares of the Fund are sold at NAV without an initial sales charge. This means that 100% of your initial investment is placed into shares of the Fund. Under the Fund's distribution and services plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act, Class C shares pay up to 1.00% on an annualized basis of the average daily net assets as reimbursement or compensation for service and distribution-related activities with respect to the Fund and/or shareholder services. Over time, fees paid under this distribution and service plan will increase the cost of a Class C shareholder's investment and may cost more than other types of sales charges. Additionally, you normally pay a CDSC of 1.00% if you redeem Class C shares during the first year after your initial purchase. The CDSC on Class C shares is waived for certain categories of investors. See "Waiver of Contingent Deferred Sales Charges" below. The minimum initial investment in Class C shares of the Fund is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment in Class C shares of the Fund is $500.

Years Since Purchase
Payment was Made
Dealer Reallowance
First 1.00%
Thereafter 0.00%

A CDSC is imposed on redemptions of Class C shares (and where applicable, Class A shares) on the amount of the redemption which causes the current value of your account for the particular class of shares of the Fund to fall below the total dollar amount of your purchase payments subject to the CDSC.

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The following rules apply under the method for calculating CDSCs:

· Shares acquired through the reinvestment of dividends or capital gains distributions will be redeemed first and will not be subject to any CDSC.
· For the redemption of all other shares, the CDSC will be based on either your original purchase price or the then current NAV of the shares being sold, whichever is lower. To illustrate this point, consider shares purchased at an NAV per share of $10. If the Fund's NAV per share at the time of redemption is $12, the CDSC will apply to the purchase price of $10. If the NAV per share at the time of redemption is $8, the CDSC will apply to the $8 current NAV per share.
· CDSCs will be deducted from the proceeds of your redemption, not from amounts remaining in your account.
· In determining whether a CDSC is payable, it is assumed that the shareholder will redeem first the lot of shares which will incur the lowest CDSC.

The following example illustrates the operation of the Class C CDSC:

· Assume that an individual opens an account and makes a purchase payment of $10,000 for 1,000 Class C shares of the Fund (at $10 per share) and that six months later the value of the investor's account for the Fund has grown through investment performance to $11,000 ($11 per share). If the investor should redeem $2,200 (200 shares), a CDSC would be applied against $2,000 of the redemption (the purchase price of the shares redeemed, because the purchase price is lower than the current NAV of such shares ($2,200)). At the rate of 1%, the Class C CDSC would be $20.

Waiver of Contingent Deferred Sales Charges

The initial sales charges on Class A shares and the CDSCs on Class A and Class C shares may be reduced or waived under certain purchase arrangements and for certain categories of investors. The CDSC applicable to Class A and Class C shares is currently waived for:

· Any partial or complete redemption in connection with (a) required minimum distributions to IRA account owners or beneficiaries who are age 70 1/2 or older or (b) distributions to participants in employer-sponsored retirement plans upon attaining age 59 1/2 or on account of death or permanent and total disability (as defined in Section 22(e) of the Internal Revenue Code) that occurs after the purchase of Class A or Class C shares.
· Any partial or complete redemption in connection with a qualifying loan or hardship withdrawal from an employer sponsored retirement plan.
· Any complete redemption in connection with a distribution from a qualified employer retirement plan in connection with termination of employment or termination of the employer's plan and the transfer to another employer's plan or to an IRA.
· Any partial or complete redemption following death or permanent and total disability (as defined in Section 22(e) of the Internal Revenue Code) of an individual holding shares for his or her own account and/or as the last survivor of a joint tenancy arrangement (this provision, however, does not cover an individual holding in a fiduciary capacity or as a nominee or agent or a legal entity that is other than an individual or the owners or beneficiaries of any such entity) provided the redemption is requested within one year of the death or initial determination of disability and provided the death or disability occurs after the purchase of the shares.
· Any redemption resulting from a return of an excess contribution to a qualified employer retirement plan or an IRA.
· Up to 10% per year of the value of the Fund account that (a) has the value of at least $10,000 at the start of such year and (b) is subject to an Automatic Withdrawal Plan.
· Redemptions by Trustees, officers and employees of any of the Trust and by directors, officers and employees of the Distributor, the Adviser or its affiliates.
· Redemptions effected pursuant to the Fund's right to involuntarily redeem a shareholder's Fund account if the aggregate net asset value of shares held in such shareholder's account is less than a minimum account size specified in the Fund's prospectus.
· Involuntary redemptions caused by operation of law.
· Redemptions of shares of the Fund that is combined with another investment company, or personal holding company by virtue of a merger, acquisition or other similar reorganization transaction.
· Redemptions by a shareholder who is a participant making periodic purchases of not less than $50 through certain employer sponsored savings plans that are clients of a broker-dealer with which the Distributor has an agreement with respect to such purchases.
· Redemptions effected by trustees or other fiduciaries who have purchased shares for employer-sponsored plans, the trustee, administrator, fiduciary, broker, trust company or registered investment adviser for which has an agreement with the Distributor with respect to such purchases.
· Redemptions in connection with IRA accounts established with Form 5305-SIMPLE under the Internal Revenue Code for which the Trust is the designated financial institution.
15
· A redemption by a holder of Class A shares who purchased $1,000,000 or more of Class A shares (and therefore did not pay a sales charge) where the participating broker or dealer involved in the sale of such shares waived the commission it would normally receive from the Distributor pursuant to an agreement with the Distributor.
· A redemption by a holder of Class A or Class C shares where the participating broker or dealer involved in the purchase of such shares waived all payments it normally would receive from the Distributor at the time of purchase (i.e., commissions or reallowances of initial sales charges and advancements of service and distribution fees).
· A redemption by a holder of Class A or Class C shares where, by agreement with the Distributor, the participating broker or dealer involved in the purchase of such shares waived a portion of any payment it normally would receive from the Distributor at the time of purchase (or otherwise agreed to a variation from the normal payment schedule) in connection with such purchase.

The Distributor may require documentation prior to waiver of the CDSC for any class, including distribution letters, certification by plan administrators, applicable tax forms, death certificates, physicians' certificates (e.g., with respect to disabilities), etc.

Exempt Transactions; No CDSCs or Payments to Brokers

Investors will not be subject to CDSCs, and brokers and dealers will not receive any commissions or reallowances of initial sales charges or advancements of service and distribution fees, on the transactions described below (which are sometimes referred to as "Exempt Transactions"):

· A redemption by a holder of Class A or Class C shares where the participating broker or dealer involved in the purchase of such shares waived all payments it normally would receive from the Distributor at the time of purchase (e.g., commissions and/or reallowances of initial sales charges and advancements of service and distribution fees.
· A redemption by a holder of Class A or Class C shares where, by agreement with the Distributor, the participating broker or dealer involved in the purchase of such shares waived a portion of any payment it normally would receive from the Distributor at the time of purchase (or otherwise agreed to a variation from the normal payment schedule) in connection with such purchase.

Class I

Class I shares of the Fund are sold at NAV without an initial sales charge and are not subject to 12b-1 distribution fees. This means that 100% of your initial investment is placed into shares of the Fund. Class I shares require a minimum initial investment of $100,000 and the minimum subsequent investment is $500.

Class I shares are available to certain institutional investors, and directly to certain individual investors as set forth below:

· Institutional investors may include, but are not limited to, corporations, retirement plans, foundations/endowments and investors who purchase through a wrap account offered through a selling group member that enters into a wrap fee program agreement with the Distributor.
· Individual investors include trustees, officers and employees of the Trust and its affiliates, and immediate family members of all such persons.
· Clients of the Adviser or purchases referred through the Adviser.

For accounts sold through financial intermediaries, it is the primary responsibility of the financial intermediary to ensure compliance with eligibility requirements such as investor type and investment minimums.

Class R

Class R shares of the Fund are sold at NAV without an initial sales charge and are subject to 12b-1 distribution fees of up to 0.40% of the average daily net assets of Class R shares. This means that 100% of your initial investment is placed into shares of the Fund. The minimum initial investment in Class R shares of the Fund is $2,500. The minimum subsequent investment in Class R shares of the Fund is $500.

Class R shares are available only to certain employer-sponsored retirement, savings or benefit plans held in plan level or omnibus accounts. Class R shares are not available to non-retirement accounts, traditional or Roth IRAs, Coverdell Education Savings Accounts, SEPs, SAR-SEPs, Simple IRAs, individual 403(b)s and most individual retirement accounts.

Factors to Consider When Choosing a Share Class: When deciding which class of shares to purchase, you should consider your investment goals, present and future amounts you may invest in the Fund, and the length of time you intend to hold your shares. To help you make a determination as to which class of shares to buy, please refer back to the examples of the Fund's expenses over time in the Fees and Expenses of the Fund section for the Fund in this Prospectus. You also may wish to consult with your financial adviser for advice with regard to which share class would be most appropriate for you.

16

Purchasing Shares: You may purchase shares of the Fund by sending a completed application form (the "Application") to the following address:

Regular/Express

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund
c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC
P.O. Box 541150

Omaha, NE 68130

-or-

Overnight Mail

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund
c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street

Suite 100

Elkhorn, NE 68022

The USA PATRIOT Act requires financial institutions, including the Fund, to adopt certain policies and programs to prevent money-laundering activities, including procedures to verify the identity of customers opening new accounts. As requested on the Application, you should supply your full name, date of birth, social security number and permanent street address. Mailing addresses containing a P.O. Box will not be accepted. This information will assist the Fund in verifying your identity. Until such verification is made, the Fund may temporarily limit additional share purchases. In addition, the Fund may limit additional share purchases or close an account if it is unable to verify a shareholder's identity. As required by law, the Fund may employ various procedures, such as comparing the information to fraud databases or requesting additional information or documentation from you, to ensure that the information supplied by you is correct.

Purchase through Brokers: You may invest in the Fund through brokers or agents who have entered into selling agreements with the Fund's distributor. The brokers and agents are authorized to receive purchase and redemption orders on behalf of the Fund. Such brokers are authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund's behalf. The Fund will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized broker or its designee receives the order. The broker or agent may set their own initial and subsequent investment minimums. You may be charged a fee if you use a broker or agent to buy or redeem shares of the Fund. Finally, various servicing agents use procedures and impose restrictions that may be in addition to, or different from those applicable to investors purchasing shares directly from the Fund. You should carefully read the program materials provided to you by your servicing agent.

Purchase by Wire: If you wish to wire money to make an investment in the Fund, please call the Fund at 1-844-828-3212 for wiring instructions and to notify the Fund that a wire transfer is coming. Any commercial bank can transfer same-day funds via wire. The Fund will normally accept wired funds for investment on the day received if they are received by the Fund's designated bank before the close of regular trading on the NYSE. Your bank may charge you a fee for wiring same-day funds.

Automated Clearing House (ACH) Purchase: Current shareholders may purchase additional shares via Automated Clearing House ("ACH"). To have this option added to your account, please send a letter to the Fund requesting this option and supply a voided check for the bank account. Only bank accounts held at domestic institutions that are ACH members may be used for these transactions.

You may not use ACH transactions for your initial purchase of Fund shares. ACH purchases will be effective at the closing price per share on the business day after the order is placed. The Fund may alter, modify or terminate this purchase option at any time.

Shares purchased by ACH will not be available for redemption until the transactions have cleared. Shares purchased via ACH transfer may take up to 15 days to clear.

Automatic Investment Plan: You may participate in the Fund's Automatic Investment Plan, an investment plan that automatically moves money from your bank account and invests it in the Fund through the use of electronic funds transfers or automatic bank drafts. You may elect to make subsequent investments by transfers of a minimum of $100 on specified days of each month into your established Fund account. Please contact the Fund at 1-844-828-3212 for more information about the Fund's Automatic Investment Plan.

Minimum and Additional Investment Amounts: The minimum initial investment for Class A, Class C, and Class R shares is $2,500. The minimum initial investment for Class I shares is $100,000. The minimum additional investment for Class A, Class C, Class I, and Class R shares is $500. There is no minimum investment requirement when you are buying shares by reinvesting dividends and distributions from the Fund. The Fund reserves the right to waive or change any investment minimum requirement. These minimum investment requirements do not apply to investors who purchase shares through certain advisory programs offered by financial intermediaries. Investors purchasing shares through these programs should consult their financial intermediary for information about any minimum investment requirements.

17

The Fund reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to reject any application to purchase shares. Applications will not be accepted unless they are accompanied by a check drawn on a U.S. bank, thrift institutions, or credit union in U.S. funds for the full amount of the shares to be purchased. After you open an account, you may purchase additional shares by sending a check together with written instructions stating the name(s) on the account and the account number, to the above address. Make all checks payable to either the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund. The Fund will not accept payment in cash, including cashier's checks or money orders. Also, to prevent check fraud, the Fund will not accept third party checks, U.S. Treasury checks, credit card checks or starter checks for the purchase of shares. Redemptions of Shares of the Fund purchased by check may be subject to a hold period until the check has been cleared by the issuing bank. To avoid such holding periods, Shares may be purchased through a broker or by wire, as described in this section.

Note: Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC, the Fund's transfer agent, will charge a $25 fee against a shareholder's account, in addition to any loss sustained by the Fund, for any check returned to the transfer agent for insufficient funds.

When Order is Processed: All shares will be purchased at the NAV per share (plus applicable sales charges, if any) next determined after the Fund receives your application or request in good order. All requests received in good order by the Fund before 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) will be processed on that same day. Requests received after 4:00 p.m. (Eastern Time) will be processed on the next business day.

Good Order: When making a purchase request, make sure your request is in good order.

"Good order" means your purchase request includes:

· the name of the Fund;
· the dollar amount of shares to be purchased;
· a completed purchase application or investment stub; and
· check payable to the "Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund."

Retirement Plans: You may purchase shares of the Fund for your individual retirement plans. Please call the Fund at 1-844-828-3212 for the most current listing and appropriate disclosure documentation on how to open a retirement account.

18

HOW TO REDEEM SHARES

Redeeming Shares: If you hold shares directly through an account with the Fund, you may redeem all or any portion of the shares credited to your account by submitting a written request for redemption to:

Regular/Express
Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund
c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC
P.O. Box 541150

Omaha, NE 68130

-or-

Overnight Mail

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund
c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street

Suite 100

Elkhorn, NE 68022

Redemptions by Telephone: The telephone redemption privilege is automatically available. If you do not want the telephone redemption privilege, you must indicate this in the appropriate area on your account application or you must write to the Fund and instruct it to remove this privilege from your account. The proceeds, which are equal to number of shares times NAV less any applicable deferred sales charges or redemption fees, will be sent by mail to the address designated on your account or sent electronically, via ACH or wire, directly to your existing account in a bank or brokerage firm in the United States as designated on your application. To redeem by telephone, call the Fund at 1-844-828-3212. The redemption proceeds normally will be sent by mail or electronically within three business days after receipt of your telephone instructions.

During periods of high market activity, you may encounter higher than usual wait times. Please allow sufficient time to ensure that you will be able to complete your telephone transaction prior to market close. Neither the Fund nor its transfer agent will be held liable if you are unable to place your trade due to high call volume.

The Fund reserves the right to suspend the telephone redemption privileges with respect to your account if the name(s) or the address on the account has been changed within the previous 30 days. Neither the Fund, its transfer agent, nor its respective affiliates will be liable for complying with telephone instructions they reasonably believe to be genuine or for any loss, damage, cost or expenses in acting on such telephone instructions and you will be required to bear the risk of any such loss. The Fund or the transfer agent, or both, will employ reasonable procedures to determine that telephone instructions are genuine. If the Fund and/or the transfer agent do not employ these procedures, they may be liable to you for losses due to unauthorized or fraudulent instructions. These procedures may include, among others, requiring forms of personal identification prior to acting upon telephone instructions, providing written confirmation of the transactions and/or tape recording telephone instructions.

Redemptions through Broker: If shares of the Fund are held by a broker-dealer, financial institution or other servicing agent, you must contact that servicing agent to redeem shares of the Fund. The servicing agent may charge a fee for this service.

Redemptions by Wire: You may request that your redemption proceeds be wired directly to your bank account. The Fund's transfer agent imposes a $15 fee for each wire redemption and deducts the fee directly from your account. Your bank may also impose a fee for the incoming wire.

Systematic Withdrawal Plan: If your individual account, IRA or other qualified plan account has a current account value of at least $10,000, you may participate in the Fund's Systematic Withdrawal Plan, an investment plan that automatically moves money to your bank account from the Fund through the use of electronic funds transfers. You may elect to make subsequent withdrawals by transfers of a minimum of $100 on specified days of each month into your established bank account. Please contact the Fund at 1-844-828-3212 for more information about the Fund's Systematic Withdrawal Plan.

19

Redemptions in Kind: It is expected that payment of redemption proceeds will normally be made from uninvested cash or short-term investments or proceeds from the sale of portfolio securities. It is possible that stressed market conditions or large shareholder redemptions may result in the need for utilization of the Fund's ability to redeem in kind in order to meet shareholder redemption requests. The Fund reserves the right to honor requests for redemption or repurchase orders made by a shareholder during any 90-day period by making payment in whole or in part in portfolio securities ("redemption in kind") if the amount of such a request is large enough to affect operations (if the request is greater than the lesser of $250,000 or 1% of the Fund's net assets at the beginning of the 90-day period). The securities will be chosen by the Fund and valued using the same procedures as used in calculating the Fund's NAV. A shareholder may incur transaction expenses in converting these securities to cash.

When Redemptions are Sent: Once the Fund receives your redemption request in "good order" as described below, it will issue a check based on the next determined NAV following your redemption request. The redemption proceeds normally will be sent by mail or by wire within three business days after receipt of a request in "good order." If you purchase shares using a check and soon after request a redemption, your redemption proceeds, which are payable at the next determined NAV following the receipt your redemption request in "good order", as described below, will not be sent until the check used for your purchase has cleared your bank.

Good Order: Your redemption request will be processed if it is in "good order." To be in good order, the following conditions must be satisfied:

· The request should be in writing, unless redeeming by telephone, indicating the number of shares or dollar amount to be redeemed;
· The request must identify your account number;
· The request should be signed by you and any other person listed on the account, exactly as the shares are registered; and
· If you request that the redemption proceeds be sent to a person, bank or an address other than that of record or paid to someone other than the record owner(s), or if the address was changed within the last 30 days, or if the proceeds of a requested redemption exceed $50,000, the signature(s) on the request must be medallion signature guaranteed by an eligible signature guarantor.

When You Need Medallion Signature Guarantees: If you wish to change the bank or brokerage account that you have designated on your account, you may do so at any time by writing to the Fund with your signature guaranteed. A medallion signature guarantee assures that a signature is genuine and protects you from unauthorized account transfers. You will need your signature guaranteed if:

· you request a redemption to be made payable to a person not on record with the Fund;
· you request that a redemption be mailed to an address other than that on record with the Fund;
· the proceeds of a requested redemption exceed $50,000;
· any redemption is transmitted by federal wire transfer to a bank other than the bank of record; or
· your address was changed within 30 days of your redemption request.

Signatures may be guaranteed by any eligible guarantor institution (including banks, brokers and dealers, credit unions, national securities exchanges, registered securities associations, clearing agencies and savings associations). Further documentation will be required to change the designated account if shares are held by a corporation, fiduciary or other organization. A notary public cannot guarantee signatures.

Retirement Plans: If you own an IRA or other retirement plan, you must indicate on your redemption request whether the Fund should withhold federal income tax. Unless you elect in your redemption request that you do not want to have federal tax withheld, the redemption will be subject to withholding.

Low Balances: If at any time your account balance falls below $2,000 ($1,000 for retirement accounts), the Fund may notify you that, unless the account is brought up to at least $2,000 ($1,000 for retirement accounts) within 30 days of the notice, your account could be closed. After the notice period, the Fund may redeem all of your shares and close your account by sending you a check to the address of record. Your account will not be closed if the account balance drops below $2,000 ($1,000 for retirement accounts) due to a decline in NAV.

20

FREQUENT PURCHASES AND REDEMPTIONS OF FUND SHARES

The Fund discourages and does not accommodate market timing. Frequent trading into and out of the Fund can harm the Fund's shareholders by disrupting the Fund's investment strategies, increasing Fund expenses, decreasing tax efficiency and diluting the value of shares held by long-term shareholders. The Fund is designed for long-term investors and is not intended for market timing or other disruptive trading activities. Accordingly, the Fund's Board has approved policies that seek to curb these disruptive activities while recognizing that shareholders may have a legitimate need to adjust their Fund investments as their financial needs or circumstances change. The Fund currently uses several methods to reduce the risk of market timing. These methods include:

· Committing staff to review, on a continuing basis, recent trading activity in order to identify trading activity that may be contrary to the Fund's "Market Timing Trading Policy";
· Rejecting or limiting specific purchase requests; and
· Rejecting purchase requests from certain investors.

Though these methods involve judgments that are inherently subjective and involve some selectivity in their application, the Fund seeks to make judgments and applications that are consistent with the interests of the Fund's shareholders.

Based on the frequency of redemptions in your account, the Adviser or transfer agent may in its sole discretion determine that your trading activity is detrimental to the Fund as described in the Fund's Market Timing Trading Policy and elect to (i) reject or limit the amount, number, frequency or method for requesting future purchases into the Fund and/or (ii) reject or limit the amount, number, frequency or method for requesting future exchanges or redemptions out of the Fund.

The Fund reserves the right to reject or restrict purchase requests for any reason, particularly when the shareholder's trading activity suggests that the shareholder may be engaged in market timing or other disruptive trading activities. Neither the Fund nor the Adviser will be liable for any losses resulting from rejected purchase orders. The Adviser may also bar an investor who has violated these policies (and the investor's financial adviser) from opening new accounts with the Fund.

Although the Fund attempts to limit disruptive trading activities, some investors use a variety of strategies to hide their identities and their trading practices. There can be no guarantee that the Fund will be able to identify or limit these activities. Omnibus account arrangements are common forms of holding shares of the Fund. While the Fund will encourage financial intermediaries to apply the Fund's Market Timing Trading Policy to their customers who invest indirectly in the Fund, the Fund is limited in its ability to monitor the trading activity or enforce the Fund's Market Timing Trading Policy with respect to customers of financial intermediaries. For example, should it occur, the Fund may not be able to detect market timing that may be facilitated by financial intermediaries or made difficult to identify in the omnibus accounts used by those intermediaries for aggregated purchases, exchanges and redemptions on behalf of all their customers. More specifically, unless the financial intermediaries have the ability to apply the Fund's Market Timing Trading Policy to their customers through such methods as implementing short-term trading limitations or restrictions and monitoring trading activity for what might be market timing, the Fund may not be able to determine whether trading by customers of financial intermediaries is contrary to the Fund's Market Timing Trading Policy. Brokers maintaining omnibus accounts with the Fund have agreed to provide shareholder transaction information to the extent known to the broker to the Fund upon request. If the Fund or its transfer agent or shareholder servicing agent suspects there is market timing activity in the account, the Fund will seek full cooperation from the service provider maintaining the account to identify the underlying participant. At the request of the Adviser, the service providers may take immediate action to stop any further short-term trading by such participants.

EXCHANGE PRIVILEGE

Upon request, eligible beneficial holders of Class A Shares may exchange their shares for Class I Shares of the Fund. The Fund will determine the eligibility of an investor to exercise the exchange privilege based on the current NAV of Class A Shares.

Such an exchange will be effected at the NAV of the Class A Shares next calculated after the exchange request is received by the Fund's transfer agent in good order. Shares of each class of the Fund represent equal pro rata interests in the Fund and accrue dividends and calculate NAV and performance quotations in the same manner. The performance of each class is quoted separately due to different actual expenses. The total return on Class I Shares can be expected to differ from the total return on Class A Shares. The Fund reserve the right, at their sole discretion, to change or discontinue the exchange privilege, or temporarily suspend the privilege during unusual market conditions when, in the judgment of management, such change or discontinuance is in the best interests of the Fund. Shareholders who exercise the exchange privilege will generally not recognize a taxable gain or loss for federal income tax purposes on an exchange of Class A Shares for Class I Shares. The exchange privilege is not currently available to beneficial holders of Class C or Class R shares of the Fund.

You may make an exchange request by sending a written request to the Fund's transfer agent or calling the Fund at 1-844-828-3212.

21

TAX STATUS, DIVIDENDS AND DISTRIBUTIONS

Dividends and Distributions: Income dividends are derived from net investment income (i.e., interest and other income, less any related expenses) the Fund earns from its portfolio securities and other investments. Capital gain distributions are derived from gains realized when the Fund sells a portfolio security. Long-term capital gains are derived from gains realized when the Fund sells a portfolio security it has owned for more than one year, and short-term capital gains are derived from gains realized when a portfolio security was owned for one year or less.

The Fund intends to distribute substantially all of its net investment income and net capital gains annually in December. Both types of distributions will be reinvested in shares of the Fund unless you elect to receive cash.

Taxes: The following information is a general summary for U.S. taxpayers. You should rely on your own tax adviser for advice about the particular federal, state and local tax consequences regarding your investment in the Fund. The Fund will distribute substantially all of its income and capital gains to its shareholders every year. In turn, shareholders generally will be taxed on distributions they receive, unless the shares are held by certain types of tax-exempt organizations or through tax-advantaged accounts (such as 401(k) plan accounts or individual retirement accounts).

A shareholder subject to U.S. federal income tax will be subject to tax on Fund income dividends and capital gain distributions whether they are paid in cash or reinvested in additional Fund shares. For U.S. federal income tax purposes, Fund distributions generally will be taxable to the shareholder as either ordinary income or capital gains. Such dividends and distributions also may be subject to state or local taxes. The Fund must report to the IRS and furnish to shareholders the cost basis information for shares purchased and sold. The Fund has chosen average cost as its standing (default) tax lot identification method for all shareholders, which means this is the method the Fund will use to determine which specific shares are deemed to be sold when there are multiple purchases on different dates at differing NAVs, and the entire position is not sold at one time. Shareholders may, however, choose a method other than the Fund's standing method at the time of their purchase or upon sale of covered shares. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors to determine the best IRS-accepted cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how cost basis reporting applies to them. Shareholders also should carefully review the cost basis information provided to them by the Fund and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on their federal income tax returns.

Income Dividends and Capital Gains: Fund income dividends (e.g., distributions of investment income) are generally taxable to shareholders as ordinary income.

U.S. federal income taxes on Fund distributions of capital gains are determined by how long the Fund owned the investments that generated the gains, rather than how long a shareholder has owned the shares. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for more than one year generally will be taxable to shareholders as long-term capital gains. Distributions of gains from investments that the Fund owned for one year or less are short-term capital gains and generally will be taxable as ordinary income.

The Fund may be subject to foreign taxes or foreign tax withholding on dividends, interest and certain capital gains earned from its foreign security investments. You may qualify for an offsetting tax credit or tax deduction under U.S. tax laws for any amount designated as your portion of the Fund's foreign tax obligations, provided that you meet certain requirements. See your tax adviser for further information.

Fund dividends and distributions are taxable to a shareholder even if they are paid from income or gains earned by the Fund prior to the shareholder's investment and thus were included in the price paid for the shares. For example, a shareholder who purchases shares on or just before the record date of the Fund distribution will pay full price for the shares and may receive a portion of his or her investment back as a taxable distribution. While in effect a return of capital to you, the distribution is still taxable even though you did not participate in these gains. You can avoid this, if you choose, by investing soon after the Fund has made a distribution.

Non-U.S. Persons: Non-U.S. persons that are considering the purchase of Fund shares should consult with their own tax advisers regarding the U.S. federal, foreign, state and local tax consequences of the purchase, ownership and disposition of the shares.

Annual Notifications: Each year, the Fund will notify shareholders of the tax status of dividends and distributions. For more information, see the SAI under "TAX STATUS."

22

DISTRIBUTION OF SHARES

Distributor: Northern Lights Distributors, LLC, located at 4221 North 203rd Street, Ste. 100 Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022 (the "Distributor"), is the distributor for the shares of the Fund. Northern Lights Distributors, LLC is a registered broker-dealer and member of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. ("FINRA"). Shares of the Fund are offered on a continuous basis.

Distribution Fees: Each class of shares of the Fund, other than Class I shares, has adopted a Distribution Plan ("12b-1 Plan" or "Plan"), pursuant to which the Fund may pay the Distributor an annual fee for distribution and shareholder servicing expenses of up to 0.25% of the Fund's average daily net assets attributable to Class A shares, up to 1.00% of the Fund's average daily net assets attributable to Class C shares and up to 0.40% of the Fund's average daily net assets attributable to Class R shares.

The Distributor and other entities are paid under the Plan for services provided and the expenses borne by the Distributor and others in the distribution of Fund shares, including the payment of commissions for sales of the shares and incentive compensation to and expenses of dealers and others who engage in or support distribution of shares or who service shareholder accounts, including overhead and telephone expenses; printing and distribution of prospectuses and reports used in connection with the offering of the Fund's shares to other than current shareholders; and preparation, printing and distribution of sales literature and advertising materials. In addition, the Distributor or other entities may utilize fees paid pursuant to the Plan to compensate dealers or other entities for their opportunity costs in advancing such amounts, which compensation would be in the form of a carrying charge on any un-reimbursed expenses.

You should be aware that if you hold your shares for a substantial period of time, you may indirectly pay more than the economic equivalent of the maximum front-end sales charge allowed by FINRA due to the recurring nature of distribution (12b-1) fees.

Additional Compensation to Financial Intermediaries: The Adviser, the Distributor and their affiliates may, at their own expense and out of their own legitimate profits, provide additional cash payments to financial intermediaries in connection with the sale or retention of Fund shares, including affiliates of the Adviser. Financial intermediaries include brokers, dealers, financial planners, banks, insurance companies, retirement or 401(k) plan administrators and others. These payments may be in addition to the Rule 12b-1 fees and any sales charges that are disclosed elsewhere in this Prospectus. These payments are generally made to financial intermediaries that promote the sale of Fund shares, provide shareholder or administrative services, or marketing support. Marketing support may include access to sales meetings, sales representatives and financial intermediary management representatives, inclusion of the Fund on a sales list, including a preferred or select sales list, or other sales programs. These payments also may be made as an expense reimbursement in cases where the financial intermediary provides shareholder services to Fund shareholders. The level of payments made to financial intermediaries in any given year will vary.

To the extent permitted by Securities and Exchange Commission and FINRA rules and other applicable laws and regulations, the Adviser, the Distributor and their affiliates may, from time to time, provide promotional incentives to certain investment firms. Such incentives may, at the Adviser's, the Distributor's or their affiliates' discretion, be limited to investment firms who allow their individual selling representatives to participate in such additional commissions.

Householding: To reduce expenses, the Fund mails only one copy of the Prospectus and each annual and semi-annual report (or, if applicable, each notice of electronic accessibility thereof) to those addresses shared by two or more accounts. If you wish to receive individual copies of these documents, please call the Fund at 1-844-828-3212 on days the Fund is open for business or contact your financial institution. The Fund will begin sending you individual copies thirty days after receiving your request.

23

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

The financial highlights table is intended to help you understand the financial performance of the Fund for the period of the Fund's operations. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund share. The total returns in the table represent the rate that an investor would have earned (or lost) on an investment in the Fund (assuming reinvestment if all dividends and distributions). The information for the years ended July 31, 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2017, has been derived from the financial statements audited by Grant Thornton LLP, whose report, along with the Fund's financial statements, is included in the Fund's annual report, which is available upon request and is incorporated by reference in the SAI.

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year

Class A
Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended
July 31, July 31, July 31, July 31, July 31,
2021 2020 2019 2018 2017
Net asset value, beginning of year $ 10.54 $ 10.87 $ 11.15 $ 9.87 $ 9.58
Activity from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss) (1) (0.04 ) (0.01 ) (2) 0.02 0.01 0.05
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 3.07 (0.27 ) (0.30 ) 1.30 0.24
Total from investment operations 3.03 (0.28 ) (0.28 ) 1.31 0.29
Less distributions from:
Net investment income - (0.04 ) (0.00 ) (3) (0.03 ) -
Return of capital - (0.01 ) (0.00 ) (3) (0.00 ) (3) -
Total distributions - (0.05 ) (0.00 ) (3) (0.03 ) -
Net asset value, end of year $ 13.57 $ 10.54 $ 10.87 $ 11.15 $ 9.87
Total return (4) 28.75 % (2.63 )% (2.48 )% 13.28 % 3.03 %
Net assets, at end of year (000's) $ 6,928 $ 8,669 $ 12,038 $ 13,867 $ 20,812
Ratio of expenses to average net assets (5) 1.68 % 1.66 % 1.64 % 1.62 % 1.53 %
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets (5,6) (0.30 )% (0.11 )% (2) 0.14 % 0.13 % 0.57 %
Portfolio Turnover Rate 64 % 293 % 226 % 48 % 384 %
(1) Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which appropriately presents the per share data for the period.
(2) The amount of net investment loss on investment per share for the period ended does not accord with the amounts in the Statements of Operations due to the timing of purchases and sales of Fund shares in relation to fluctuating market values.
(3) Represents less than $0.005 per share.
(4) Total returns are historical in nature and exclude the effect of applicable sales charges and assumes reinvestment of dividends.
(5) The ratios of expenses and net investment income to average net assets do not reflect the Fund's proportionate share of income and expenses of underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(6) Recognition of net investment income by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
24

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year

Class C
Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended
July 31, July 31, July 31, July 31, July 31,
2021 2020 2019 2018 2017
Net asset value, beginning of year $ 10.17 $ 10.53 $ 10.87 $ 9.68 $ 9.53
Activity from investment operations:
Net investment loss (1) (0.12 ) (0.09 ) (2) (0.07 ) (2) (0.06 ) (2) (0.03 ) (2)
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 2.94 (0.27 ) (0.27 ) 1.25 0.24
Total from investment operations 2.82 (0.36 ) (0.34 ) 1.19 0.21
Less distributions from:
Net investment income - - - - (0.06 )
Total distributions - - - - (0.06 )
Net asset value, end of year $ 12.99 $ 10.17 $ 10.53 $ 10.87 $ 9.68
Total return (3) 27.73 % (3.42 )% (3.13 )% 12.29 % 2.28 %
Net assets, at end of year (000's) $ 345 $ 1,087 $ 1,529 $ 2,140 $ 2,997
Ratio of expenses to average net assets (4) 2.43 % 2.41 % 2.39 % 2.37 % 2.28 %
Ratio of net investment loss to average net assets (4,5) (1.05 )% (0.88 )% (2) (0.64 )% (2) (0.61 )% (2) (0.31 )% (2)
Portfolio Turnover Rate 64 % 293 % 226 % 48 % 384 %
(1) Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which appropriately presents the per share data for the period.
(2) The amount of net investment loss on investment per share for the period ended does not accord with the amounts in the Statements of Operations due to the timing of purchases and sales of Fund shares in relation to fluctuating market values.
(3) Total returns are historical in nature and exclude the effect of applicable sales charges and assumes reinvestment of dividends.
(4) The ratios of expenses and net investment income to average net assets do not reflect the Fund's proportionate share of income and expenses of underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(5) Recognition of net investment income by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
25

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year

Class I
Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended
July 31, July 31, July 31, July 31, July 31,
2021 2020 2019 2018 2017
Net asset value, beginning of year $ 10.40 $ 10.74 $ 11.02 $ 9.77 $ 9.58
Activity from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss) (1) (0.00 ) (2) 0.01 0.04 0.04 0.07
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 3.03 (0.27 ) (0.28 ) 1.28 0.24
Total from investment operations 3.03 (0.26 ) (0.24 ) 1.32 0.31
Less distributions from:
Net investment income - (0.07 ) (0.04 ) (0.07 ) (0.12 )
Return of capital - (0.01 ) (0.00 ) (2) (0.00 ) (2) -
Total distributions - (0.08 ) (0.04 ) (0.07 ) (0.12 )
Net asset value, end of year $ 13.43 $ 10.40 $ 10.74 $ 11.02 $ 9.77
Total return (3) 29.13 % (2.50 )% (2.18 )% 13.53 % 3.28 %
Net assets, at end of year (000's) $ 64,338 $ 75,871 $ 92,978 $ 110,151 $ 137,869
Ratio of expenses to average net assets (4) 1.43 % 1.41 % 1.39 % 1.37 % 1.28 %
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets (4,5) (0.03 )% 0.13 % 0.38 % 0.39 % 0.81 %
Portfolio Turnover Rate 64 % 293 % 226 % 48 % 384 %
(1) Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which appropriately presents the per share data for the period.
(2) Represents less than $0.005 per share.
(3) Total returns are historical in nature and exclude the effect of applicable sales charges and assumes reinvestment of dividends.
(4) The ratios of expenses and net investment income to average net assets do not reflect the Fund's proportionate share of income and expenses of underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(5) Recognition of net investment income by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
26

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Per Share Data and Ratios for a Share of Beneficial Interest Outstanding Throughout Each Year

Class R
Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended Year Ended
July 31, July 31, July 31, July 31, July 31,
2021 2020 2019 2018 2017
Net asset value, beginning of year $ 10.37 $ 10.70 $ 10.98 $ 9.73 $ 9.53
Activity from investment operations:
Net investment income (loss) (1) (0.05 ) (0.03 ) (2) (0.00 ) (3) (0.00 ) (3) 0.04
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss) on investments 3.01 (0.27 ) (0.28 ) 1.27 0.23
Total from investment operations 2.96 (0.30 ) (0.28 ) 1.27 0.27
Less distributions from:
Net investment income - (0.02 ) - (0.02 ) (0.07 )
Return of capital - (0.01 ) - (0.00 ) (3) -
Total distributions - (0.03 ) - (0.02 ) (0.07 )
Net asset value, end of year $ 13.33 $ 10.37 $ 10.70 $ 10.98 $ 9.73
Total return (4) 28.54 % (2.81 )% (2.55 )% 13.03 % 2.85 %
Net assets, at end of year (000's) $ 16,898 $ 16,931 $ 22,998 $ 27,131 $ 33,952
Ratio of expenses to average net assets (5) 1.83 % 1.81 % 1.79 % 1.77 % 1.68 %
Ratio of net investment income (loss) to average net assets (5,6) (0.43 )% (0.26 )% (2) (0.01 )% (0.03 )% 0.45 %
Portfolio Turnover Rate 64 % 293 % 226 % 48 % 384 %
(1) Per share amounts calculated using the average shares method, which appropriately presents the per share data for the period.
(2) The amount of net investment loss on investment per share for the period ended does not accord with the amounts in the Statements of Operations due to the timing of purchases and sales of Fund shares in relation to fluctuating market values.
(3) Represents less than $0.005 per share.
(4) Total returns are historical in nature and exclude the effect of applicable sales charges and assumes reinvestment of dividends.
(5) The ratios of expenses and net investment income to average net assets do not reflect the Fund's proportionate share of income and expenses of underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(6) Recognition of net investment income by the Fund is affected by the timing and declaration of dividends by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests.
27

PRIVACY NOTICE

FACTS WHAT DOES TWO ROADS SHARED TRUST DO WITH YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION
Why? Financial companies choose how they share your personal information. Federal law gives consumers the right to limit some but not all sharing. Federal law also requires us to tell you how we collect, share, and protect your personal information. Please read this notice carefully to understand what we do.
What?

THE TYPES OF PERSONAL INFORMATION WE COLLECT AND SHARE DEPENDS ON THE PRODUCT OR SERVICE THAT YOU HAVE WITH US. THIS INFORMATION CAN INCLUDE:

  • Social Security number and income
  • Account transactions and transaction history
  • Investment experience and purchase history

When you are no longer our customer, we continue to share your information as described in this notice.

How? All financial companies need to share customers' personal information to run their everyday business. In the section below, we list the reasons financial companies can share their customers' personal information; the reason Two Roads Shared Trust chooses to share and whether you can limit this sharing.
Reasons we can share your personal information Does Two Roads
Shared Trust share?
Can you limit
this sharing?

For our everyday business purposes -

such as to process your transactions, maintain your account(s), respond to court orders and legal investigations, or report to credit bureaus

YES NO

For our marketing purposes -

to offer our products and services to you

NO We do not share
For joint marketing with other financial companies NO We do not share

For our affiliates' everyday business purposes -

information about your transactions and experiences

NO We do not share

For our affiliates' everyday business purposes -

information about your creditworthiness

NO We do not share
For our affiliates to market to you NO We do not share
For nonaffiliates to market to you NO We do not share
Questions? Call 1-631-490-4300
28

What we do

How does Two Roads Shared Trust protect my personal information?

To protect your personal information from unauthorized access and use, we use security measures that comply with federal law. These measures include computer safeguards and secured files and buildings.

Our service providers are held accountable for adhering to strict policies and procedures to prevent any misuse of your nonpublic personal information.

How does Two Roads Shared Trust collect my personal information?

We collect your personal information, for example, when you

  • open an account or give us contact information
  • provide account information or give us your income information
  • make deposits or withdrawals from your account

We also collect your personal information from other companies.

Why can't I limit all sharing?

Federal law gives you the right to limit only

  • sharing for affiliates' everyday business purposes - information about your creditworthiness
  • affiliates from using your information to market to you
  • sharing for nonaffiliates to market to you

State laws and individual companies may give you additional rights to limit sharing

Definitions

Affiliates

Companies related by common ownership or control. They can be financial and nonfinancial companies.

  • Two Roads Shared Trust has no affiliates.
Nonaffiliates

Companies not related by common ownership or control. They can be financial and nonfinancial companies.

  • Two Roads Shared Trust does not share with nonaffiliates so they can market to you.
Joint marketing

A formal agreement between nonaffiliates financial companies that together market financial products or services to you.

  • Two Roads Shared Trust does not jointly market.
29

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Adviser

Hanlon Investment Management, Inc.

3393 Bargaintown Road

Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Grant Thornton LLP

2001 Market Street, Suite 700

Philadelphia, PA 19103

Custodian

The Bank of New York Mellon

One Wall Street

New York, NY 10286

Legal Counsel

Blank Rome LLP

1271 Avenue of the Americas

New York, NY 10020

Distributor

Northern Lights Distributors, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100

Elkhorn, NE 68022

Transfer Agent

Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

225 Pictoria Drive, Suite 450

Cincinnati, Ohio, 45246

Additional information about the Fund is included in the Fund's SAI. The SAI is incorporated into this Prospectus by reference (i.e., legally made a part of this Prospectus). The SAI provides more details about the Fund's policies and management. Additional information about the Fund's investments is also available in the Fund's Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to Shareholders. In the Fund's Annual Report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund's performance during its last fiscal year.

To obtain a free copy of the SAI and the Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to Shareholders, or other information about the Fund, or to make shareholder inquiries about the Fund, please call the Fund at 1-844-828-3212. The SAI, Annual and Semi-Annual reports to shareholders and other information relating to the Fund can be found at www.HanlonFunds.com. You may also write to:

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund
c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

P.O. Box 541150

Omaha, Nebraska 68154

Reports and other information about the Fund are available on the EDGAR Database on the SEC's Internet site at http://www.sec.gov. Copies of the information may be obtained, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following e-mail address: [email protected]

Investment Company Act File # 811-22718

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

(f/k/a Hanlon Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund)

Series of Two Roads Shared Trust

Fund Class A Class C Class I Class R
Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund HTDAX HTDCX HTDIX HTDRX

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

November 30, 2021

This Statement of Additional Information ("SAI") is not a prospectus and should be read in conjunction with the prospectus of the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund (formerly known as Hanlon Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund) (the "Fund") dated November 30, 2021, copies of which may be obtained without charge by contacting the Fund's Transfer Agent, Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 541150, Omaha, Nebraska 68154. You may also obtain the prospectus for the Fund by calling or by visiting the Fund's website:

Fund Name Phone Number Website
Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund 1-844-828-3212 www.HanlonFunds.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE FUND 1
TYPES OF INVESTMENTS, STRATEGIES AND RELATED RISKS 1
INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS 26
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS 27
MANAGEMENT 28
CONTROL PERSONS AND PRINCIPAL HOLDERS 33
INVESTMENT ADVISER 33
THE DISTRIBUTOR 36
PORTFOLIO MANAGERS 38
ALLOCATION OF PORTFOLIO BROKERAGE 39
PORTFOLIO TURNOVER 40
OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS 40
DESCRIPTION OF SHARES 42
ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING PROGRAM 42
PURCHASE, REDEMPTION AND PRICING OF SHARES 43
TAX STATUS 46
INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM 51
LEGAL COUNSEL 51
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 51
APPENDIX A 52
APPENDIX B 55

THE FUND

The Fund is a series of Two Roads Shared Trust, a Delaware statutory trust organized on June 8, 2012 (the "Trust"). The Trust is registered as an open-end management investment company, currently consisting of twenty-four separate portfolios. The Trust is governed by its Board of Trustees (the "Board" or "Trustees"). The Fund may issue an unlimited number of shares of beneficial interest. All shares of the Fund have equal rights and privileges. Each share of the Fund is entitled to one vote on all matters as to which shares are entitled to vote. In addition, each share of The Fund is entitled to participate equally with other shares (i) in dividends and distributions declared by the Fund and (ii) on liquidation to its proportionate share of the assets remaining after satisfaction of outstanding liabilities. Shares of the Fund are fully paid, non-assessable and fully transferable when issued and have no pre-emptive, conversion or exchange rights. Fractional shares have proportionately the same rights, including voting rights, as are provided for a full share.

The Fund consists of Class A, Class C, Class I and Class R shares. The Fund's investment objective, restrictions and policies are more fully described herein and in the Prospectus. The Board may launch other series and offer shares of a new fund under the Trust at any time.

Under the Trust's Agreement and Declaration of Trust, each of the Trustees will continue in office until the termination of the Trust or his/her earlier death, incapacity, resignation or removal. Shareholders can remove a Trustee to the extent provided by the Investment Company of Act of 1940 (the "1940 Act") and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder. Vacancies may be filled by a majority of the remaining Trustees, except insofar as the 1940 Act may require the election by shareholders. As a result, normally no annual or regular meetings of shareholders will be held unless matters arise requiring a vote of shareholders under the Agreement and Declaration of Trust or the 1940 Act.

TYPES OF INVESTMENTS, STRATEGIES AND RELATED RISKS

The investment objective of the Fund and a description of its principal investment strategies are set forth under "Additional Information about Principal Investment Strategies and Related Risks" in the Fund's Prospectus. The Fund's investment objective is not a fundamental policy and may be changed without the approval of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund.

The following pages contain more detailed information about the types of instruments in which the Fund may invest, strategies the Adviser may employ in pursuit of the Fund's investment objectives and a summary of related risks.

Certificates of Deposit and Bankers' Acceptances

The Fund may invest in certificates of deposit and bankers' acceptances, which are considered to be short-term money market instruments.

Certificates of deposit are receipts issued by a depository institution in exchange for the deposit of funds. The issuer agrees to pay the amount deposited plus interest to the bearer of the receipt on the date specified on the certificate. The certificate usually can be traded in the secondary market prior to maturity. Bankers' acceptances typically arise from short-term credit arrangements designed to enable businesses to obtain funds to finance commercial transactions. Generally, an acceptance is a time draft drawn on a bank by an exporter or an importer to obtain a stated amount of funds to pay for specific merchandise. The draft is then "accepted" by a bank that, in effect, unconditionally guarantees to pay the face value of the instrument on its maturity date. The acceptance may then be held by the accepting bank as an earning asset or it may be sold in the secondary market at the going rate of discount for a specific maturity. Although maturities for acceptances can be as long as 270 days, most acceptances have maturities of six months or less.

Commercial Paper

The Fund may purchase commercial paper. Commercial paper consists of short-term (usually from 1 to 270 days) unsecured promissory notes issued by corporations in order to finance their current operations. See Appendix B for more information on ratings assigned to commercial paper. It may be secured by letters of credit, a surety bond or other forms of collateral. Commercial paper is usually repaid at maturity by the issuer from the proceeds of the issuance of new commercial paper. As a result, investment in commercial paper is subject to the risk the issuer cannot issue enough new commercial paper to satisfy its outstanding commercial paper, also known as rollover risk. Commercial paper may become illiquid or may suffer from reduced liquidity in certain circumstances. Like all fixed income securities, commercial paper prices are susceptible to fluctuations in interest rates. If interest rates rise, commercial paper prices will decline. The short-term nature of a commercial paper investment makes it less susceptible to interest rate risk than many other fixed income securities because interest rate risk typically increases as maturity lengths increase. Commercial paper tends to yield smaller returns than longer-term corporate debt because securities with shorter maturities typically have lower effective yields than those with longer maturities. As with all fixed income securities, there is a chance that the issuer will default on its commercial paper obligation.

1

Cyber Security Risk

The Fund and its service providers may be prone to operational and information security risks resulting from breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption, or lose operational capacity. Breaches in cyber security include, among other behaviors, stealing or corrupting data maintained online or digitally, denial of service attacks on websites, the unauthorized release of confidential information or various other forms of cyber-attacks. Cyber security breaches affecting the Fund or its Adviser, custodian, transfer agent, intermediaries and other third-party service providers may adversely impact the Fund. For instance, cyber security breaches may interfere with the processing of shareholders transactions, impact the Fund's ability to calculate its net asset value ("NAV"), cause the release of private shareholder information or confidential business information, impede trading, subject the Fund to regulatory fines or financial losses and/or cause reputational damage. The Fund may also incur additional costs for cyber security risk management purposes. Similar types of cyber security risks are also present for issuers of securities in which the Fund may invest, which could result in material adverse consequences for such issuers and may cause the Fund's investment in such companies to lose value.

Depositary Receipts

Sponsored and unsponsored American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") are receipts issued by an American bank or trust company evidencing ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign (non-U.S.) issuer. ADRs, in registered form, are designed for use in U.S. securities markets. In addition to the investment risks associated with the underlying issuer, ADRs expose the Fund to additional risk associated with the non-uniform terms that apply to ADR programs, credit exposure to the depository bank and to the sponsors and other parties with whom the depository bank establishes the program, currency risk and liquidity risk. Unsponsored ADRs may be created without the participation of the foreign (non-U.S.) issuer. Holders of these ADRs generally bear all the costs of the ADR facility, whereas foreign (non-U.S.) issuers typically bear certain costs in a sponsored ADR. The bank or trust company depositary of an unsponsored ADR may be under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the foreign (non-U.S.) issuer or to pass through voting rights. Many of the risks described below regarding foreign securities apply to investments in ADRs.

Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs") are receipts issued by non-U.S. financial institutions evidencing ownership of underlying foreign or U.S. securities and are usually denominated in foreign currencies. GDRs may not be denominated in the same currency as the securities they represent. Generally, GDRs are designed for use in the foreign securities markets.

Derivative Instruments

The Fund may purchase and write call and put options on securities, securities indices and foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, and enter into futures contracts and use options on futures contracts as further described below. The Fund may also enter into swap agreements with respect to foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, interest rates and securities indices. The Fund may use these techniques to hedge against changes in interest rates, foreign (non-U.S.) currency exchange rates or securities prices or to attempt to achieve investment returns as part of its overall investment strategies. The Fund may also purchase and sell options relating to foreign (non-U.S.) currencies for purposes of increasing exposure to a foreign (non-U.S.) currency or to shift exposure to foreign (non-U.S.) currency fluctuations from one country to another. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by the Adviser in accordance with procedures established by the Board (or, as permitted by applicable regulation, enter into certain offsetting positions) to cover its obligations under options, futures, and swaps to avoid leveraging the portfolio of the Fund as described below.

The Fund considers derivative instruments to consist of securities or other instruments whose value is derived from or related to the value of another instrument or asset or the level of an index, such as the S&P 500 Index, or indices, and not to include those securities whose payment of principal and/or interest depends upon cash flows from underlying assets, such as mortgage-related or asset-backed securities. The value of some derivative instruments in which the Fund invests may be particularly sensitive to changes in prevailing interest rates, and, like the other investments of the Fund, the ability of the Fund to successfully utilize these instruments may depend in part upon the ability of the Adviser to correctly forecast interest rates and other economic factors. If the Adviser incorrectly forecasts such factors and has taken positions in derivative instruments contrary to prevailing market trends, the Fund could be exposed to the risk of loss. In addition, while the use of derivatives for hedging purposes can reduce losses, it can also reduce or eliminate gains, and hedges are sometimes subject to imperfect matching between the derivative and security it is hedging, which means that a hedge might not be effective. The Fund might not employ any of the strategies described above, and no assurance can be given that any strategy used will succeed. A decision as to whether, when and how to utilize derivative instruments involves skill and judgment, and even a well-conceived derivatives strategy may be unsuccessful. The use of derivative instruments involves brokerage fees and/or other transaction costs.

Investment in futures-related and commodity-linked derivatives may subject the Fund to additional risks, and in particular may subject the Fund to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities. The value of futures-related and commodity-linked derivative instruments may be affected by changes in overall market movements, commodity index volatility, changes in interest rates or factors affecting a particular industry or commodity, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs, and international economic, political and regulatory developments. In order to qualify for the special tax treatment available to regulated investment

2

companies under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), the Fund must, among other requirements, derive at least 90% of its gross income each taxable year from certain specified types of investments. It is currently unclear which types of commodities-linked derivatives fall within these specified investment types. As a result, if the Fund's investment in commodities-linked derivatives were to exceed a certain threshold, the Fund could fail to qualify for the special tax treatment available to regulated investment companies under the Code.

Regulatory Risks of Derivative Use

The U.S. government has enacted legislation that provides for new regulation of the derivatives market. The Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") has recently adopted a new rule relating to a registered investment company's use of derivatives and related instruments that will require the Fund to observe more stringent asset coverage and related requirements than previously imposed by the 1940 Act, which could adversely affect the value or performance of the Fund. The European Union (and some other countries) are implementing similar requirements, which will affect the Fund when it enters into a derivatives transaction with a counterparty organized in that country or otherwise subject to that country's derivatives regulations. Because these regulations are new and evolving (and some of the rules are not yet final), their impact remains unclear. These regulations could limit or impact the Fund's ability to invest in derivatives and other instruments, limit the Fund's ability to employ certain strategies that use derivatives and adversely affect the Fund's performance, efficiency in implementing its strategy, liquidity and ability to pursue its investment objectives.

Effective 2013, the Commodities Futures Trading Commission ("CFTC") rules require advisers to certain registered investment companies to register with the CFTC as commodity pool operators ("CPO") if their investment companies are unable to meet certain trading and marketing limitations. The Fund's Adviser has claimed relief from registration as a CPO. However, it is possible that the Adviser may be required to register as a CPO in the future and comply with any applicable reporting, disclosure or other regulatory requirements. Compliance with CFTC regulatory requirements will increase Fund expenses. Other potentially adverse regulatory initiatives could also develop. It is also possible that additional government regulation of various types of derivative instruments, including futures, options and swap agreements, may limit or prevent the Fund from using such instruments as a part of its investment strategy, and could ultimately prevent the Fund from being able to achieve its investment objective. It is impossible to fully predict the effects of past, present or future legislation and regulation in this area, but the effects could be substantial and adverse. It is possible that legislative and regulatory activity could limit or restrict the ability of the Fund to use certain instruments as a part of its investment strategy. Limits or restrictions applicable to the counterparties with which the Fund may engage in derivative transactions could also prevent the Fund from using certain instruments.

There is a possibility of future regulatory changes altering, perhaps to a material extent, the nature of an investment in the Fund or the ability of the Fund to continue to implement its investment strategy. The futures, options and swaps markets are subject to comprehensive statutes, regulations, and margin requirements. In addition, the SEC, CFTC and the exchanges are authorized to take extraordinary actions in the event of a market emergency, including, for example, the implementation or reduction of speculative position limits, the implementation of higher margin requirements, the establishment of daily price limits and the suspension of trading. The regulation of futures, options and swaps transactions in the U.S. is a rapidly changing area of law and is subject to modification by government and judicial action.

In 2010, the U.S. government enacted legislation that provides for new regulation of the derivatives market, including clearing, margin, reporting and registration requirements. The CFTC and certain futures exchanges have also established limits, referred to as "position limits," on the maximum net long or net short positions which any person may hold or control in particular options and futures contracts. All positions owned or controlled by the same person or entity, even if in different accounts, may be aggregated for purposes of determining whether the applicable position limits have been exceeded. Thus, even if the Fund does not intend to exceed applicable position limits, it is possible that different clients managed by the Adviser and any of its affiliates may be aggregated for this purpose. The trading decisions of the Adviser may have to be modified and positions held by the Fund may have to be liquidated in order to avoid exceeding such limits. The modification of investment decisions or the elimination of open positions, if it occurs, may adversely affect the profitability of the Fund.

The SEC has in the past adopted interim rules requiring reporting of all short positions on securities above a certain de minimis threshold and may adopt rules requiring monthly and/or enhanced public disclosure in the future. In addition, other non-U.S. jurisdictions where the Fund may trade have adopted reporting requirements. If the Fund's securities short positions or its strategy become generally known, it could have a significant effect on the Adviser's ability to implement its investment strategy. In particular, it would make it more likely that other investors could cause a "short squeeze" in the securities held short by the Fund forcing the Fund to cover its positions at a loss. Such reporting requirements may also limit the Adviser's ability to access management and other personnel at certain companies where the Adviser seeks to take a short position. In addition, if other investors engage in copycat behavior by taking positions in the same issuers as the Fund, the cost of borrowing securities to sell short could increase drastically and the availability of such securities to the Fund could decrease drastically. Such events could make the Fund unable to execute its investment strategy. In addition, the SEC recently proposed additional restrictions on short sales. If the SEC were to adopt additional restrictions regarding short sales, they could restrict the Fund's

3

ability to engage in short sales of securities in certain circumstances, and the Fund may be unable to execute its investment strategy as a result.

The SEC and regulatory authorities in other jurisdictions may adopt (and in certain cases, have adopted) bans on short sales of certain securities in response to market events. Bans on short selling may make it impossible for the Fund to execute certain investment strategies and may have a material adverse effect on the Fund's ability to generate returns.

Equity Securities

Equity securities include common stocks, preferred stocks and securities convertible into common stocks, such as convertible bonds, warrants, rights and options. The value of equity securities varies in response to many factors, including the activities and financial condition of individual companies, the business market in which individual companies compete and general market and economic conditions. Equity securities fluctuate in value, often based on factors unrelated to the value of the issuer of the securities, and such fluctuations can be significant.

Common Stock

Common stock represents an equity (ownership) interest in a company, and usually possesses voting rights and earns dividends. Dividends on common stock are not fixed but are declared at the discretion of the issuer. Common stock generally represents the riskiest investment in a company. In addition, common stock generally has the greatest appreciation and depreciation potential because increases and decreases in earnings are usually reflected in a company's stock price.

Convertible Securities

Convertible securities include fixed income securities that may be exchanged or converted into a predetermined number of shares of the issuer's underlying common stock at the option of the holder during a specified period. Convertible securities may take the form of convertible preferred stock, convertible bonds or debentures, units consisting of "usable" bonds and warrants or a combination of the features of several of these securities. Convertible securities are senior to common stocks in an issuer's capital structure, but are usually subordinated to similar non-convertible securities. While providing a fixed-income stream (generally higher in yield than the income derivable from common stock but lower than that afforded by a similar nonconvertible security), a convertible security also gives an investor the opportunity, through its conversion feature, to participate in the capital appreciation of the issuing company depending upon a market price advance in the convertible security's underlying common stock.

Preferred Stock

Preferred stock is a class of stock that has features of debt because it generally entitles the holder to periodic payments at a fixed rate of return. Preferred stock has a preference over common stock as to the payment of dividends and the recovery of investment should a company be liquidated, although preferred stock is usually junior to any outstanding debt of the issuer. Preferred stock typically does not possess voting rights and its market value may change based on changes in interest rates.

The fundamental risk of investing in common and preferred stock is the risk that the value of the stock might decrease. Stock values fluctuate in response to the activities of an individual company or in response to general market and/or economic conditions. Historically, common stocks have provided greater long-term returns and have entailed greater short-term risks than preferred stocks, fixed income securities and money market investments. The market value of all securities, including common and preferred stocks, is based upon the market's perception of value and not necessarily the book value of an issuer or other objective measures of a company's worth. Preferred stock may be subject to more fluctuations in market value, due to changes in market participants' perceptions of the issuer's ability to continue to pay dividends, than debts of the same issuer. A preferred stock may be considered either debt or equity, depending on the economic characteristics exhibited by such preferred stock.

Warrants

Warrants are options to purchase common stock at a specific price (usually at a premium above the market value of the optioned common stock at issuance) valid for a specific period of time. Warrants may have a life ranging from less than one year to twenty years, or they may be perpetual. However, most warrants have expiration dates after which they are worthless. In addition, a warrant is worthless if the market price of the common stock does not exceed the warrant's exercise price during the life of the warrant. Warrants have no voting rights, pay no dividends, and have no rights with respect to the assets of the

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corporation issuing them. The percentage increase or decrease in the market price of the warrant may tend to be greater than the percentage increase or decrease in the market price of the optioned common stock.

Fixed Income Securities

Yields on fixed income securities are dependent on a variety of factors, including the general conditions of the money market and other fixed income securities markets, the size of a particular offering, the maturity of the obligation and the rating of the issue. An investment in any Fund will be subjected to risk even if all fixed income securities in the Fund's portfolio are paid in full at maturity. All fixed income securities, including U.S. Government securities, can change in value when there is a change in interest rates or the issuer's actual or perceived creditworthiness or ability to meet its obligations.

There is normally an inverse relationship between the market value of securities sensitive to prevailing interest rates and actual changes in interest rates. In other words, an increase in interest rates produces a decrease in market value. The longer the remaining maturity (and duration) of a security, the greater will be the effect of interest rate changes on the market value of that security. Changes in the ability of an issuer to make payments of interest and principal and in the markets' perception of an issuer's creditworthiness will also affect the market value of the fixed income securities of that issuer. Obligations of issuers of fixed income securities (including municipal securities) are subject to the provisions of bankruptcy, insolvency, and other laws affecting the rights and remedies of creditors, such as the Federal Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978. In addition, the obligations of municipal issuers may become subject to laws enacted in the future by Congress, state legislatures, or referenda extending the time for payment of principal and/or interest, or imposing other constraints upon enforcement of such obligations or upon the ability of municipalities to levy taxes. Changes in the ability of an issuer to make payments of interest and principal and in the market's perception of an issuer's creditworthiness will also affect the market value of the fixed income securities of that issuer. The possibility exists, therefore, that, the ability of any issuer to pay, when due, the principal of and interest on its fixed income securities may become impaired.

The corporate fixed income securities in which the Fund may invest include corporate bonds and notes and short-term investments such as commercial paper and variable rate demand notes. Commercial paper (short-term promissory notes) is issued by companies to finance their or their affiliate's current obligations and is frequently unsecured. Variable and floating rate demand notes are unsecured obligations redeemable upon not more than 30 days' notice. These obligations include master demand notes that permit investment of fluctuating amounts at varying rates of interest pursuant to a direct arrangement with the issuer of the instrument. The issuer of these obligations often has the right, after a given period, to prepay the outstanding principal amount of the obligations upon a specified number of days' notice. These obligations generally are not traded, nor generally is there an established secondary market for these obligations. To the extent a demand note does not have a 7-day or shorter demand feature and there is no readily available market for the obligation, it is treated as an illiquid security.

Fixed income securities are subject to a variety of risks, such as interest rate risk, income risk, call (or prepayment) risk, inflation risk, credit risk and (in the case of foreign securities) country and currency risk.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Currency Transactions

The Fund may engage in foreign (non-U.S.) currency transactions, including foreign (non-U.S.) currency forward contracts, options, swaps, and other strategic transactions in connection with investments in securities of non-U.S. companies. The Fund will conduct its foreign (non-U.S.) currency exchange transactions either on a spot (i.e., cash) basis at the spot rate prevailing in the foreign (non-U.S.) currency exchange market or through forward contracts to purchase or sell foreign (non-U.S.) currencies.

The Fund may enter into forward foreign (non-U.S.) currency exchange contracts (forward contracts) in order to protect against possible losses on foreign (non-U.S.) investments resulting from adverse changes in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, as well as to increase exposure to a foreign (non-U.S.) currency or to shift exposure to foreign (non-U.S.) currency fluctuations from one country to another. A forward contract is an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency for an agreed price on a future date which is individually negotiated and privately traded by currency traders and their customers. Although foreign (non-U.S.) exchange dealers often do not charge a fee for conversion, they do realize a profit based on the difference (spread) between the price at which they are buying and selling various currencies. However, forward contracts may limit the potential gains which could result from a positive change in such currency relationships. The Fund will segregate or "earmark" assets determined to be liquid by the Adviser in accordance with procedures established by the Board, to cover the Fund's obligations under forward foreign (non-U.S.) currency exchange contracts entered into for non-hedging purposes.

The Fund may purchase and write put and call options on foreign (non-U.S.) currencies for the purpose of protecting against declines in the U.S. dollar value of foreign (non-U.S.) portfolio securities and against increases in the U.S. dollar cost of foreign (non-U.S.) securities to be acquired. As with other kinds of options, however, the writing of an option on foreign (non-U.S.) currency will constitute only a partial hedge, up to the amount of the premium received, and the Fund could be required to purchase or sell foreign (non-U.S.) currencies at disadvantageous exchange rates, thereby incurring losses. The purchase of an option on foreign (non-U.S.) currency may constitute

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an effective hedge against fluctuation in exchange rates although, in the event of rate movements adverse to the Fund's position, the Fund may forfeit the entire amount of the premium plus related transaction costs.

The Fund may enter into interest rate swaps on either an asset-based or liability-based basis, depending on whether it is hedging its assets or its liabilities, and will usually enter into interest rate swaps on a net basis (i.e., the two payment streams are netted out, with the Fund receiving or paying, as the case may be, only the net amount of the two payments). The net amount of the excess, if any, of the Fund's obligations over its entitlement with respect to each interest rate swap will be calculated on a daily basis and an amount of cash or other liquid assets (marked to market daily) having an aggregate net asset value at least equal to the accrued excess will be segregated or "earmarked." The Adviser will monitor the creditworthiness of all counterparties on an ongoing basis. If there is a default by the other party to such a transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction. There is no limit on the amount of interest rate swap transactions that may be entered into by the Fund, subject to the segregation requirement described above. These transactions may in some instances involve the delivery of securities or other underlying assets by the Fund or its counterparty to collateralize obligations under the swap. Under the documentation currently used in those markets, the risk of loss with respect to interest rate swaps is limited to the net amount of the payments that the Fund is contractually obligated to make. If the other party to an interest rate swap that is not collateralized defaults, the Fund would risk the loss of the net amount of the payments that it contractually is entitled to receive.

While the Adviser is authorized to hedge against currency risk, it is not required to do so. The Adviser may choose not to hedge currency exposure.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Government Securities

The Fund may invest in foreign (non-U.S.) government securities, including securities issued by foreign (non-U.S.) governments, including political subdivisions, or their authorities, agencies, instrumentalities or by supra-national agencies. Different kinds of foreign (non-U.S.) government securities have different types of government support. For example, some foreign (non-U.S.) government securities are supported by the full faith and credit of a foreign (non-U.S.) national government or a political subdivision and some are not. Foreign (non-U.S.) government securities of some countries may involve varying degrees of credit risk as a result of financial or political instability in those countries or the possible inability of the Fund to enforce its rights against a foreign (non-U.S.) government. As with issuers of other fixed income securities, sovereign issuers may be unable or unwilling to satisfy their obligations to pay principal or interest payments.

Supra-national agencies are agencies whose member nations make capital contributions to support the agencies' activities. Examples include the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (the World Bank), the Asian Development Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank.

As with other fixed income securities, foreign (non-U.S.) government securities expose their holders to market risk because their values typically change as interest rates fluctuate. For example, the value of foreign (non-U.S.) government securities may fall during times of rising interest rates. Also, yields on foreign (non-U.S.) government securities tend to be lower than those of corporate securities of comparable maturities.

In addition to investing directly in foreign (non-U.S.) government securities, the Fund may purchase certificates of accrual or similar instruments evidencing undivided ownership interests in interest payments and/or principal payments of foreign (non-U.S.) government securities. Certificates of accrual and similar instruments may be more volatile than other foreign (non-U.S.) government securities.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Investments - General

To the extent consistent with its investment objective and strategies, the Fund may invest in foreign securities, including bonds and other fixed-income securities of foreign issuers. Foreign fixed-income securities may include eurodollar convertible securities, which are fixed-income securities that are issued in U.S. dollars outside the United States and are convertible into or exchangeable for equity securities of the same or a different issuer.

Investment in foreign securities involves special risks. These include market risk, interest rate risk and the risks of investing in securities of foreign issuers and of companies whose securities are principally traded outside the United States on foreign exchanges or foreign over-the-counter markets and in investments denominated in foreign currencies. Market risk involves the possibility that security prices will decline over short or even extended periods. The markets tend to be cyclical, with periods of generally rising prices and periods of generally declining prices. These cycles will affect the value of the Fund to the extent that it invests in foreign securities. The holdings of the Fund, to the extent that it invests in fixed-income securities, will be sensitive to changes in interest rates and the interest rate environment. Generally, the prices of bonds and debt securities fluctuate inversely with interest rate changes. In addition, the performance of investments in securities denominated in a foreign currency will depend on the strength of the foreign currency against the U.S. dollar and the interest rate environment in the country issuing the currency. Absent other events which could otherwise affect

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the value of a foreign security (such as a change in the political climate or an issuer's credit quality), appreciation in the value of the foreign currency generally can be expected to increase the value of a foreign currency-denominated security in terms of U.S. dollars. A rise in foreign interest rates or decline in the value of the foreign currency relative to the U.S. dollar generally can be expected to depress the value of a foreign currency-denominated security.

There are other risks and costs involved in investing in foreign securities which are in addition to the usual risks inherent in domestic investments. Investment in foreign securities involves higher costs than investment in U.S. securities, including higher transaction and custody costs as well as the imposition of additional taxes by foreign governments. Foreign investments also involve risks associated with the level of currency exchange rates, less complete financial information about the issuers, less market liquidity, more market volatility and political instability. Future political and economic developments, the possible imposition of withholding taxes on dividend income, the possible seizure or nationalization of foreign holdings, the possible establishment of exchange controls, or the adoption of other governmental restrictions might adversely affect an investment in foreign securities. Additionally, foreign banks and foreign branches of domestic banks are subject to less stringent reserve requirements, and to different accounting, auditing and recordkeeping requirements. Also, the legal remedies for investors may be more limited than the remedies available in the United States. Additionally, many countries throughout the world are dependent on a healthy U.S. economy and are adversely affected when the U.S. economy weakens or its markets decline. For example, the decline in the U.S. subprime mortgage market quickly spread throughout global credit markets, triggering a liquidity crisis that affected fixed-income and equity markets around the world.

European countries can be affected by the significant fiscal and monetary controls that the European Economic and Monetary Union ("EMU") imposes for membership. Europe's economies are diverse, its governments are decentralized, and its cultures vary widely. Several EU countries, including Greece, Ireland, Italy, Spain and Portugal, have faced budget issues, some of which may have negative long-term effects for the economies of those countries and other EU countries. There is continued concern about national-level support for the euro and the accompanying coordination of fiscal and wage policy among EMU member countries. Member countries are required to maintain tight control over inflation, public debt, and budget deficit to qualify for membership in the EMU. These requirements can severely limit the ability of EMU member countries to implement monetary policy to address regional economic conditions.

In January 31, 2020, the United Kingdom ("UK") left the EU. This departure, commonly referred to as "Brexit," commenced a transition period during which the EU and UK will negotiate and agree on the nature of their future relationship. There is significant market uncertainty regarding Brexit's ramifications, and the range and potential implications of possible political, regulatory, economic, and market outcomes are difficult to predict. This uncertainty may affect other countries in the EU and elsewhere, and may cause volatility within the EU, triggering prolonged economic downturns in certain countries within the EU. In addition, Brexit may create additional and substantial economic stresses for the UK, including a contraction of the UK economy and price volatility in UK stocks, decreased trade, capital outflows, devaluation of the British pound, wider corporate bond spreads due to uncertainty and declines in business and consumer spending as well as foreign direct investment. Brexit may also adversely affect UK-based financial firms that have counterparties in the EU or participate in market infrastructure (trading venues, clearing houses, settlement facilities) based in the EU. As a result, the Fund may be exposed to volatile trading markets and significant and unpredictable currency fluctuations over a short period of time, and potentially lower economic growth in the UK, Europe and globally. Securities issued by companies domiciled in the UK could be subject to changing regulatory and tax regimes. Banking and financial services companies that operate in the UK or EU could be disproportionately impacted by these actions.

Further insecurity in EU membership or the abandonment of the euro could exacerbate market and currency volatility and negatively impact the Fund's or an underlying fund's investments in securities issued by companies located in EU countries. The impact of these actions, especially if they occur in a disorderly fashion, is not clear but could be significant and far-reaching, and the resulting market volatility may have an adverse effect on the performance of the Fund.

Many non-governmental issuers, and even certain governments, have defaulted on, or been forced to restructure, their debts; many other issuers have faced difficulties obtaining credit or refinancing existing obligations; financial institutions have in many cases required government or central bank support, have needed to raise capital, and/or have been impaired in their ability to extend credit; and financial markets in Europe and elsewhere have experienced extreme volatility and declines in asset values and liquidity. These difficulties may continue, worsen or spread within and without Europe. Responses to the financial problems by European governments, central banks and others, including austerity measures and reforms, may not work, may result in social unrest and may limit future growth and economic recovery or have other unintended consequences. Further defaults or restructurings by governments and others of their debt could have additional adverse effects on economies, financial markets and asset valuations around the world. In addition, one or more countries may abandon the euro, the common currency of the European Union, and/or withdraw from the European Union. The impact of these actions, especially if they occur in a disorderly fashion, is not clear but could be significant and far-reaching.

To the extent consistent with its investment objectives and strategies, the Fund (or an underlying fund) may invest in foreign debt, including the securities of foreign governments. Several risks exist concerning such investments, including the risk that foreign governments may default on their obligations, may not respect the integrity of such debt, may attempt to renegotiate the debt at a lower rate, and may not honor investments by U.S. entities or citizens.

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Although the Fund may invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies, its portfolio securities and other assets are valued in U.S. dollars. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time causing, together with other factors, the Fund's NAV to fluctuate as well. Currency exchange rates can be affected unpredictably by the intervention or the failure to intervene by U.S. or foreign governments or central banks, or by currency controls or political developments in the United States or abroad. To the extent that the Fund's total assets, adjusted to reflect the Fund's net position after giving effect to currency transactions, are denominated in the currencies of foreign countries, the Fund will be more susceptible to the risk of adverse economic and political developments within those countries.

Dividends and interest payable on the Fund's foreign portfolio securities may be subject to foreign withholding taxes. To the extent such taxes are not offset by credits or deductions allowed to investors under U.S. federal income tax law, they may reduce the net return to the shareholders.

The Fund's income and, in some cases, capital gains from foreign stocks and securities will be subject to applicable taxation in certain of the countries in which they invest, and treaties between the United States and such countries may not be available in some cases to reduce the otherwise applicable tax rates.

The Fund also is subject to the possible imposition of exchange control regulations or freezes on the convertibility of currency. In addition, through the use of forward currency exchange contracts with other instruments, the net currency positions of the Fund may expose it to risks independent of its securities positions. Although the net long and short foreign currency exposure of the Fund will not exceed its total asset values, to the extent that the Fund is fully invested in foreign securities while also maintaining currency positions, it may be exposed to greater risk than it would have if it did not maintain the currency positions.

The Fund's foreign securities are generally held outside the United States in the primary market for the securities in the custody of certain eligible foreign banks and trust companies, as permitted under the 1940 Act ("foreign sub-custodians"). Settlement practices for foreign securities may differ from those in the United States. Some countries have limited governmental oversight and regulation of industry practices, stock exchanges, depositories, registrars, brokers and listed companies, which increases the risk of corruption and fraud and the possibility of losses to the Fund. In particular, under certain circumstances, foreign securities may settle on a delayed delivery basis, meaning that the Fund may be required to make payment for securities before the Fund has actually received delivery of the securities or deliver securities prior to the receipt of payment. Typically, in these cases, the Fund will receive evidence of ownership in accordance with the generally accepted settlement practices in the local market entitling the Fund to deliver payment at a future date, but there is a risk that the security will not be delivered to the Fund or that payment will not be received, although the Fund and its foreign sub-custodians take reasonable precautions to mitigate this risk.

Foreign markets also have different clearance and settlement procedures, and in certain markets there have been times when settlements have been unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions, making it difficult to conduct such transactions. Such delays in settlement could result in temporary periods when a portion of the assets of the Fund remain uninvested and no return is earned on such assets. The inability of the Fund to make intended security purchases or sales due to settlement problems could result in missed attractive investment opportunities, losses to the underlying fund due to subsequent declines in value of the portfolio securities or, if the Fund has entered into a contract to sell the securities, possible liability to the purchaser. Losses can also result from lost, stolen or counterfeit securities; defaults by brokers and banks; failures or defects of the settlement system; or poor and improper record keeping by registrars and issuers.

Share blocking refers to a practice in certain foreign markets under which an issuer's securities are blocked from trading at the custodian or sub-custodian level for a specified number of days before and, in certain instances, after a shareholder meeting where a vote of shareholders takes place. The blocking period can last up to several weeks. Share blocking may prevent the underlying funds from buying or selling securities during this period, because during the time shares are blocked, trades in such securities will not settle. It may be difficult or impossible to lift blocking restrictions, with the particular requirements varying widely by country.

High Yield Securities

Greater Risk of Loss

These securities are regarded as predominately speculative. There is a greater risk that issuers of lower-rated securities will default than issuers of higher-rated securities. Issuers of lower-rated securities generally are less creditworthy and may be highly indebted, financially distressed, or bankrupt. These issuers are more vulnerable to real or perceived economic changes, political changes or adverse industry developments. In addition, high yield securities are frequently subordinated to the prior payment of senior indebtedness. If an issuer fails to pay principal or interest on securities held by the Fund, the Fund would experience a decrease in income and a decline in the market value of its investments.

Sensitivity to Interest Rate and Economic Changes

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The income and market value of lower-rated securities may fluctuate more than higher-rated securities. Although non-investment grade securities tend to be less sensitive to interest rate changes than investment grade securities, non-investment grade securities are more sensitive to short-term corporate, economic and market developments. During periods of economic uncertainty and change, the market price of the investments in lower-rated securities may be volatile. The default rate for high yield bonds tends to be cyclical, with defaults rising in periods of economic downturn.

Valuation Difficulties

It is often more difficult to value lower-rated securities than higher-rated securities. If an issuer's financial condition deteriorates, accurate financial and business information may be limited or unavailable. In addition, the lower-rated investments may be thinly traded and there may be no established secondary market. Because of the lack of market pricing and current information for investments in lower-rated securities, valuation of such investments is much more dependent on judgment than is the case with higher-rated securities.

Liquidity

There may be no established secondary or public market for investments in lower-rated securities. Such securities are frequently traded in markets that may be relatively less liquid than the market for higher-rated securities. In addition, relatively few institutional purchasers may hold a major portion of an issue of lower-rated securities at times. As a result, the Fund may be required to sell investments at substantial losses or retain them indefinitely when an issuer's financial condition is deteriorating.

Credit Quality

Credit quality of non-investment grade securities can change suddenly and unexpectedly, and even recently-issued credit ratings may not fully reflect the actual risks posed by a particular high-yield security.

New Legislation

Future legislation may have a possible negative impact on the market for high yield, high risk bonds. As an example, in the late 1980's, legislation required federally-insured savings and loan associations to divest their investments in high yield, high risk bonds. New legislation, if enacted, could have a material negative effect on the Fund's investments in lower-rated securities.

High yield, high risk investments may include the following:

Straight fixed income securities

These include bonds and other debt obligations that bear a fixed or variable rate of interest payable at regular intervals and have a fixed or resettable maturity date. The particular terms of such securities vary and may include features such as call provisions and sinking funds.

Zero-coupon debt securities

These do not pay periodic interest but are issued at a discount from their value at maturity. When held to maturity, their entire return equals the difference between their issue price and their maturity value.

Zero-fixed-coupon debt securities

These are zero-coupon debt securities that convert on a specified date to periodic interest-paying debt securities.

Pay-in-kind bonds

These are bonds which allow the issuer, at its option, to make current interest payments on the bonds either in cash or in additional bonds. These bonds are typically sold without registration under the Securities Act of 1933 (the "Securities Act"), usually to a relatively small number of institutional investors.

Convertible Securities

These are bonds or preferred stock that may be converted to common stock.

Preferred Stock

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These are stocks that generally pay a dividend at a specified rate and have preference over common stock in the payment of dividends and in liquidation.

Loan Participations and Assignments

These are participations in, or assignments of all or a portion of loans to corporations or to governments, including governments of less developed countries ("LDCs").

Securities issued in connection with Reorganizations and Corporate Restructurings

In connection with reorganizing or restructuring of an issuer, an issuer may issue common stock or other securities to holders of its fixed income securities. The Fund may hold such common stock and other securities even if it does not invest in such securities.

Distressed Securities

An investment in distressed securities may involve a substantial degree of risk. These instruments, which involve loans, loan participations, bonds, notes, non-performing and sub-performing mortgage loans typically are unrated, lower-rated, in default or close to default. Many of these instruments are not publicly traded, and may become illiquid. The prices of such instruments may be extremely volatile. Securities of distressed companies are generally more likely to become worthless than the securities of more financially stable companies. Valuing such instruments may be difficult, and the Fund may lose all of its investment, or it may be required to accept cash or securities with a value less than the Fund's original investment. Issuers of distressed securities are typically in a weak financial condition and may default, in which case the Fund may lose its entire investment.

Illiquid and Restricted Securities

Pursuant to Rule 22e-4 under the 1940 Act, the Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in illiquid investments. An illiquid investment is an investment that the Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions within 7 calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. Illiquid investments include securities that are illiquid by virtue of the absence of a readily available market (e.g., because trading in the security is suspended or because market makers do not exist or will not entertain bids or offers) or legal or contractual restrictions on resale (e.g., because they have not been registered under the Securities Act). Illiquid investments include: repurchase agreements and time deposits with a notice or demand period of more than seven days; interest rate; currency, mortgage and credit default swaps; interest rate caps; floors and collars; municipal leases; certain restricted securities, such as those purchased in a private placement of securities, unless it is determined, based upon a review of the trading markets for a specific restricted security, that such restricted security is liquid; and certain over-the-counter options. Securities that have legal or contractual restrictions on resale but have a readily available market are not considered illiquid for purposes of this limitation. With respect to the Fund, repurchase agreements subject to demand are deemed to have a maturity equal to the notice period. Foreign (non-U.S.) securities that are freely tradable in their principal markets are not considered to be illiquid.

Restricted and other illiquid investments may be subject to the potential for delays on resale and uncertainty in valuation. The Fund might be unable to dispose of illiquid investments promptly or at reasonable prices and might thereby experience difficulty in satisfying redemptions within seven days. The Fund might also have to register restricted securities in order to dispose of them resulting in additional expense and delay. Adverse market conditions could impede such a public offering of securities. To the extent an investment held by the Fund is deemed to be an illiquid investment or a less liquid investment, the Fund will be exposed to a greater liquidity risk.

In October 2016, the SEC adopted a new liquidity risk management rule, Rule 22e-4 under the 1940 Act, requiring open-end funds, such as the Fund, to establish a liquidity risk management program and to enhance disclosures regarding fund liquidity. As required by Rule 22e-4, the Trust has implemented a liquidity risk management program and related procedures to identify illiquid investments pursuant to Rule 22e-4. If the limitation on illiquid investments is exceeded, other than by a change in market values, the condition will be reported to the Board and, when required, to the SEC. The rule may impact the Fund's performance and ability to achieve its investment objective.

A large institutional market exists for certain securities that are not registered under the Securities Act, including foreign (non-U.S.) securities. The fact that there are contractual or legal restrictions on resale to the general public or to certain institutions may not be indicative of the liquidity of such investments. Rule 144A under the Securities Act allows such a broader institutional trading market for securities otherwise subject to restrictions on resale to the general public. Rule 144A establishes a "safe harbor" from the registration requirements of the Securities Act for resale of certain securities to qualified institutional buyers. Rule 144A has produced enhanced liquidity for many restricted securities, and market liquidity for such securities may continue to expand as a result of this regulation and the consequent existence of the PORTAL system, which is an automated system for the trading, clearance and settlement of unregistered securities of domestic and foreign (non-U.S.) issuers sponsored by the Financial Industry Regulatory, Inc.

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Under the current guidelines of the staff of the SEC, illiquid investments are also considered to include, among other securities, purchased OTC options, certain cover of or for OTC options, repurchase agreements with maturities in excess of seven days, and certain securities whose disposition is restricted under federal securities laws.

Under guidelines adopted by the Trust's Board, the Fund's Adviser may determine that particular Rule 144A securities, and commercial paper issued in reliance on the private placement exemption from registration afforded by Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act, are liquid even though they are not registered. A determination of whether such a security is liquid or not is a question of fact. In making this determination, the Adviser will consider, as it deems appropriate under the circumstances and among other factors: (1) the frequency of trades and quotes for the security; (2) the number of dealers willing to purchase or sell the security; (3) the number of other potential purchasers of the security; (4) dealer undertakings to make a market in the security; (5) the nature of the security (e.g., debt or equity, date of maturity, terms of dividend or interest payments, and other material terms) and the nature of the marketplace trades (e.g., the time needed to dispose of the security, the method of soliciting offers, and the mechanics of transfer); and (6) the rating of the security and the financial condition and prospects of the issuer. In the case of commercial paper, the Adviser will also determine that the paper (1) is not traded flat or in default as to principal and interest, and (2) is rated in one of the two highest rating categories by at least two Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations ("NRSROs") or, if only one NRSRO rates the security, by that NRSRO, or, if the security is unrated, the Adviser determines that it is of equivalent quality.

Rule 144A securities and Section 4(a)(2) commercial paper that have been deemed liquid as described above will continue to be monitored by the Adviser to determine if the security is no longer liquid as the result of changed conditions. Investing in Rule 144A securities or Section 4(a)(2) commercial paper could have the effect of increasing the amount of the Fund's assets invested in illiquid securities if institutional buyers are unwilling to purchase such securities.

Lending Portfolio Securities

For the purpose of achieving income, the Fund may lend its portfolio securities, provided (1) the loan is secured continuously by collateral consisting of U.S. Government securities or cash or cash equivalents (cash, U.S. Government securities, negotiable certificates of deposit, bankers' acceptances or letters of credit) maintained on a daily mark-to-market basis in an amount equal to at least 102% of the current market value of the loaned domestic securities (105% of loaned foreign securities), (2) The Fund may at any time call the loan and obtain the return of securities loaned, (3) The Fund will receive any interest or dividends received on the loaned securities, and (4) the aggregate value of the securities loaned will not at any time exceed one-third of the total assets of The Fund.

As with other extensions of credit, there are risks that collateral could be inadequate in the event of the borrower failing financially, which could result in actual financial loss, and risks that recovery of loaned securities could be delayed, which could result in interference with portfolio management decisions or exercise of ownership rights. The Fund will be responsible for the risks associated with the investment of cash collateral, including the risk that the Fund may lose money on the investment or may fail to earn sufficient income to meet its obligations to the borrower. In addition, the Fund may lose its right to vote its shares of the loaned securities at a shareholders meeting if the Adviser does not recall or does not timely recall the loaned securities, or if the borrower fails to return the recalled securities in advance of the record date for the meeting.

Securities lending involves counterparty risk, including the risk that the loaned securities may not be returned or returned in a timely manner and/or a loss of rights in the collateral if the borrower or the lending agent defaults or fails financially. This risk is increased when the Fund's loans are concentrated with a single or limited number of borrowers. There are no limits on the number of borrowers to which the Fund may lend securities and the Fund may lend securities to only one or a small group of borrowers. In addition, under the Securities Lending Agreement, loans may be made to affiliates of the Custodian, as identified in the Securities Lending Agreement.

Cash collateral may be invested by the Fund in several government money-market funds. Investment of cash collateral offers the opportunity for the Fund to profit from income earned by this collateral pool, but also the risk of loss, should the value of the Fund's shares in the collateral pool decrease below their initial value.

LIBOR Risk

The Fund may invest in securities and other instruments whose interest payments are determined by references to the London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR").

The United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, announced that after 2021 it will cease its active encouragement of banks to provide the quotations needed to sustain LIBOR. On March 5, 2021, ICE Benchmark Administration Limited, the administrator of LIBOR, announced its intention to cease publishing a majority of the USD LIBOR rates immediately after publication on June 30, 2023, with the remaining USD LIBOR rates to end immediately after publication on December 31, 2021 The U.S. Federal Reserve, based on the recommendations of the New York Federal Reserve's Alternative Reference Rate Committee (comprised of major derivative market participants and their regulators), has begun publishing Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR), a broad measure of secured overnight U.S. Treasury repo rates, that is intended to replace USD LIBOR. Proposals for alternative reference rates for other currencies have also been announced or have already begun publication,. The unavailability of LIBOR presents risks to the Fund, including the risk that any pricing or adjustments to the Fund's investments resulting from a substitute or alternate reference rate may adversely affect the Fund's performance and/or NAV. It remains uncertain how such changes would be implemented

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and the effects such changes would have on the Fund, including any negative effects on the Fund's liquidity and valuation of the Fund's investments, issuers of instruments in which the Fund invests and financial markets generally.

Margin Deposits and Cover Requirements

Margin Deposits for Futures Contracts

Unlike the purchase or sale of portfolio securities, no price is paid or received by the Fund upon the purchase or sale of a futures contract. Initially, the Fund will be required to deposit with the broker an amount of cash or cash equivalents, known as initial margin, based on the value of the contract. The nature of initial margin in futures transactions is different from that of margin in securities transactions in that futures contract margin does not involve the borrowing of funds by the customer to finance the transactions. Rather, the initial margin is in the nature of a performance bond or good faith deposit on the contract which is returned to the Fund upon termination of the futures contract, assuming all contractual obligations have been satisfied. Subsequent payments, called variation margin, to and from the broker, will be made on a daily basis as the price of the underlying instruments fluctuates, making the long and short positions in the futures contract more or less valuable, a process known as "marking to the market." For example, when the Fund has purchased a futures contract and the price of the contract has risen in response to a rise in the price of the underlying instruments, that position will have increased in value and the Fund will be entitled to receive from the broker a variation margin payment equal to that increase in value. Conversely, where the Fund has purchased a futures contract and the price of the futures contract has declined in response to a decrease in the underlying instruments, the position would be less valuable and the Fund would be required to make a variation margin payment to the broker. At any time prior to expiration of the futures contract, the Adviser may elect to close the position by taking an opposite position, subject to the availability of a secondary market, which will operate to terminate the Fund's position in the futures contract. A final determination of variation margin is then made, additional cash is required to be paid by or released to the Fund, and the Fund realizes a loss or gain.

Cover Requirements for Forward Contracts, Swap Agreements, Options, Futures and Options on Futures

The Fund will comply with guidelines established by the SEC with respect to coverage of forwards, futures, swaps and options. These guidelines may, in certain instances, require segregation by the Fund of cash or liquid securities with its custodian or a designated sub-custodian to the extent the Fund's obligations with respect to these strategies are not otherwise "covered" through ownership of the underlying security, financial instrument or currency or by other portfolio positions or by other means consistent with applicable regulatory policies. Segregated assets cannot be sold or transferred unless equivalent assets are substituted in their place or it is no longer necessary to segregate them. As a result, there is a possibility that segregation of a large percentage of the Fund's assets could impede portfolio management or the Fund's ability to meet redemption requests or other current obligations.

For example, when entering into a futures contract that will be cash settled, the Fund will cover (and mark-to-market on a daily basis) liquid assets that, when added to the amounts deposited with a futures commission merchant as margin, are equal to the mark-to-market amount, if any, owed by the Fund on the futures contract. When entering into a futures contract that does not need to be settled in cash, the Fund will maintain with its custodian (and mark to market on a daily basis) liquid assets that, when added to the amounts deposited with a futures commission merchant as margin, are equal to the full notional value of the contract. Alternatively, the Fund may "cover" its position by purchasing an option on the same futures contract with a strike price as high or higher than the price of the contract held by the Fund or by entering into an agreement that enables the Fund to settle such futures contracts in cash.

To the extent the Fund writes credit default swaps, the Fund will segregate or "earmark" cash or assets determined to be liquid by the Fund in accordance with procedures established by the Fund's Board, or enter into offsetting positions, with a value at least equal to the full notional amount of the swap (minus any amounts owed to the Fund). Such segregation or "earmarking" will ensure that the Fund has assets available to satisfy its obligations with respect to the transaction and will limit any potential leveraging of the Fund's portfolio. Also, the Fund does not invest more than 25% of its assets in contracts with any one counterparty.

Mortgage Pass-Through Securities

Interests in pools of mortgage pass-through securities differ from other forms of fixed income securities (which normally provide periodic payments of interest in fixed amounts and the payment of principal in a lump sum at maturity or on specified call dates). Instead, mortgage pass-through securities provide monthly payments consisting of both interest and principal payments. In effect, these payments are a "pass-through" of the monthly payments made by the individual borrowers on the underlying residential mortgage loans, net of any fees paid to the issuer or guarantor of such securities. Unscheduled payments of principal may be made if the underlying mortgage loans are repaid or refinanced or the underlying properties are foreclosed, thereby shortening the securities' weighted average life. Some mortgage pass-through securities (such as securities guaranteed by Ginnie Mae) are described as "modified pass-through securities."

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These securities entitle the holder to receive all interest and principal payments owed on the mortgage pool, net of certain fees, on the scheduled payment dates regardless of whether the mortgagor actually makes the payment.

The principal governmental guarantor of mortgage pass-through securities is Ginnie Mae. Ginnie Mae is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by lending institutions approved by Ginnie Mae (such as savings and loan institutions, commercial banks and mortgage bankers) and backed by pools of mortgage loans. These mortgage loans are either insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Veterans Administration. A "pool" or group of such mortgage loans is assembled and after being approved by Ginnie Mae, is offered to investors through securities dealers.

Mortgage-backed securities issued by the Federal National Mortgage Association ("Fannie Mae") include Fannie Mae Guaranteed Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, which are solely the obligations of Fannie Mae and are not backed by or entitled to the full faith and credit of the United States, except as described below, but are supported by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury. Fannie Mae is a stockholder-owned corporation chartered under an Act of the U.S. Congress. Fannie Mae certificates are guaranteed as to timely payment of the principal and interest by Fannie Mae. Mortgage-related securities issued by the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("Freddie Mac") include Freddie Mac Mortgage Participation Certificates. Freddie Mac is a corporate instrumentality of the United States, created pursuant to an Act of Congress. Freddie Mac certificates are not guaranteed by the United States or by any Federal Home Loan Banks and do not constitute a debt or obligation of the United States or of any Federal Home Loan Bank. Freddie Mac certificates entitle the holder to timely payment of interest, which is guaranteed by Freddie Mac. Freddie Mac guarantees either ultimate collection or timely payment of all principal payments on the underlying mortgage loans. When Freddie Mac does not guarantee timely payment of principal, Freddie Mac may remit the amount due on account of its guarantee of ultimate payment of principal after default.

From time to time, proposals have been introduced before Congress for the purpose of restricting or eliminating federal sponsorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Trust cannot predict what legislation, if any, may be proposed in the future in Congress with regard to such sponsorship or which proposals, if any, might be enacted. Such proposals, if enacted, might materially and adversely affect the availability of government guaranteed mortgage-backed securities and the Fund's liquidity and value.

There is risk that the U.S. government will not provide financial support to its agencies, authorities, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises. The Fund may purchase U.S. government securities that are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, such as those issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The maximum potential liability of the issuers of some U.S. government securities held by the Fund may greatly exceed their current resources, including their legal right to support from the U.S. Treasury. It is possible that these issuers will not have the Fund to meet their payment obligations in the future.

The volatility and disruption that impacted the capital and credit markets during late 2008 and into 2009 have led to increased market concerns about Freddie Mac's and Fannie Mae's ability to withstand future credit losses associated with securities held in their investment portfolios, and on which they provide guarantees, without the direct support of the federal government. On September 7, 2008, both Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae were placed under the conservatorship of the Federal Housing Finance Agency ("FHFA").

Under the plan of conservatorship, the FHFA has assumed control of, and generally has the power to direct, the operations of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, and is empowered to exercise all powers collectively held by their respective shareholders, directors and officers, including the power to: (1) take over the assets of and operate Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae with all the powers of the shareholders, the directors, and the officers of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae and conduct all business of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae; (2) collect all obligations and money due to Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae; (3) perform all functions of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae which are consistent with the conservator's appointment; (4) preserve and conserve the assets and property of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae; and (5) contract for assistance in fulfilling any function, activity, action or duty of the conservator. In addition, in connection with the actions taken by the FHFA, the U.S. Treasury Department (the "Treasury") entered into certain preferred stock purchase agreements with each of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae which established the Treasury as the holder of a new class of senior preferred stock in each of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, which stock was issued in connection with financial contributions from the Treasury to Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae.

The conditions attached to the financial contribution made by the Treasury to Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae and the issuance of this senior preferred stock placed significant restrictions on the activities of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae. Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae must obtain the consent of the Treasury to, among other things: (i) make any payment to purchase or redeem its capital stock or pay any dividend other than in respect of the senior preferred stock issued to the Treasury, (ii) issue capital stock of any kind, (iii) terminate the conservatorship of the FHFA except in connection with a receivership, or (iv) increase its debt beyond certain specified levels. In addition, significant restrictions were placed on the maximum size of each of Freddie Mac's and Fannie Mae's respective portfolios of mortgages and mortgage-backed securities, and the purchase agreements entered into by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae provide that the maximum size of their portfolios of these assets must decrease by a specified percentage each year. The future status and role of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae could be impacted by (among other things): the actions taken and restrictions placed on Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae by the FHFA in its role as conservator; the restrictions placed on Freddie Mac's and Fannie Mae's operations and activities as a

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result of the senior preferred stock investment made by the Treasury; market responses to developments at Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae; and future legislative and regulatory action that alters the operations, ownership, structure and/or mission of these institutions, each of which may, in turn, impact the value of, and cash flows on, any mortgage-backed securities guaranteed by Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, including any such mortgage-backed securities held by the Fund.

As a result of the economic recession that commenced in the United States in 2008, there is a heightened risk that the receivables and loans underlying the asset-backed securities purchased by the Fund may suffer greater levels of default than was historically experienced.

Commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, private mortgage insurance companies, mortgage bankers and other secondary market issuers also create pass-through pools of conventional residential mortgage loans. Such issuers may, in addition, be the originators and/or servicers of the underlying mortgage loans as well as the guarantors of the mortgage pass-through securities.

Caps and Floors

The underlying mortgages that collateralize the Adjustable Rate Mortgage Securities ("ARMs") in which the Fund may invest will frequently have caps and floors which limit the maximum amount by which the loan rate to the residential borrower may change up or down: (1) per reset or adjustment interval, and (2) over the life of the loan. Some residential mortgage loans restrict periodic adjustments by limiting changes in the borrower's monthly principal and interest payments rather than limiting interest rate changes. These payment caps may result in negative amortization. The value of mortgage securities in which the Fund invests may be affected if market interest rates rise or fall faster and farther than the allowable caps or floors on the underlying residential mortgage loans. Additionally, even though the interest rates on the underlying residential mortgages are adjustable, amortization and prepayments may occur, thereby causing the effective maturities of the mortgage securities in which the Fund invests to be shorter than the maturities stated in the underlying mortgages.

Inverse Floaters

Inverse floaters constitute a class of mortgage-backed securities with a coupon rate that moves inversely to a designated index, such as LIBOR (London Interbank Offered Rate) or 11th District Cost of Funds Index ("COFI"). Inverse floaters have coupon rates that typically change at a multiple of the changes of the relevant index rate. Any rise in the index rate (as a consequence of an increase in interest rates) causes a drop in the coupon rate on an inverse floater while any drop in the index rate causes an increase in the coupon rate of an inverse floater. In some circumstances, the coupon on an inverse floater could decrease to zero. In addition, like most other fixed income securities, the value of inverse floaters will decrease as interest rates increase and their average lives will extend. Inverse floaters exhibit greater price volatility than the majority of mortgage-backed securities. In addition, some inverse floaters display extreme sensitivity to changes in prepayments. As a result, the yield to maturity of an inverse floater is sensitive not only to changes in interest rates but also to changes in prepayment rates on the related underlying mortgage assets. As described above, inverse floaters may be used alone or in tandem with interest-only stripped mortgage instruments.

Mortgage Dollar Rolls

The Fund may enter into mortgage dollar rolls with a bank or a broker-dealer. A mortgage dollar roll is a transaction in which the Fund sells mortgage-related securities for immediate settlement and simultaneously purchases the same type of securities for forward settlement at a discount. While the Fund begins accruing interest on the newly purchased securities from the purchase or trade date, it is able to invest the proceeds from the sale of its previously owned securities, which will be used to pay for the new securities, in money market investments until a future settlement date. The use of mortgage dollar rolls is a speculative technique involving leverage, and is considered to be a form of borrowing.

Private Mortgage Pass-Through Securities

Private mortgage pass-through securities, also known as "non-agency mortgage securities", are structured similarly to the Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac mortgage pass-through securities and are issued by United States and foreign (non-U.S.) private issuers such as originators of and investors in mortgage loans, including savings and loan associations, mortgage banks, commercial banks, investment banks and special purpose subsidiaries of the foregoing. These securities usually are backed by a pool of conventional fixed-rate or adjustable-rate mortgage loans. Since private mortgage pass-through securities typically are not guaranteed by an entity having the credit status of Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, such securities generally are structured with one or more types of credit enhancement.

Mortgage assets often consist of a pool of assets representing the obligations of a number of different parties. There are usually fewer properties in a pool of assets backing commercial mortgage-backed securities than in a pool of assets backing residential mortgage-backed securities; hence they may be more sensitive to the performance of fewer mortgage assets. To lessen the

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effect of failures by obligors on underlying assets to make payments, those securities may contain elements of credit support, which fall into two categories: (i) liquidity protection; and (ii) protection against losses resulting from ultimate default by an obligor on the underlying assets. Liquidity protection refers to the provision of advances, generally by the entity administering the pool of assets, to ensure that the receipt of payments on the underlying pool occurs in a timely fashion. Protection against losses resulting from default ensures ultimate payment of the obligations on at least a portion of the assets in the pool. This protection may be provided through guarantees, insurance policies or letters of credit obtained by the issuer or sponsor from third parties, through various means of structuring the transaction or through a combination of such approaches. The degree of credit support provided for each issue is generally based on historical information respecting the level of credit risk associated with the underlying assets. Delinquencies or losses in excess of those anticipated could adversely affect the return on an investment in a security. The Fund will not pay any fees for credit support, although the existence of credit support may increase the price of a security.

Resets

The interest rates paid on the ARMs in which the Fund may invest generally are readjusted or reset at intervals of one year or less to an increment over some predetermined interest rate index. There are two main categories of indices: those based on U.S. Treasury securities and those derived from a calculated measure, such as a cost-of-funds index or a moving average of mortgage rates. Commonly utilized indices include the one-year and five-year constant maturity Treasury Note rates, the three-month Treasury Bill rate, the 180-day Treasury Bill rate, rates on longer-term Treasury securities, the National Median Cost of Funds, the one-month or three-month London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR"), the prime rate of a specific bank, or commercial paper rates. Some indices, such as the one-year constant maturity Treasury Note rate, closely mirror changes in market interest rate levels. Others tend to lag changes in market rate levels and tend to be somewhat less volatile.

Stripped Mortgage Securities

Stripped mortgage securities may be issued by federal agencies, or by private originators of, or investors in, mortgage loans, including savings and loan associations, mortgage banks, commercial banks, investment banks and special purpose subsidiaries of the foregoing. Stripped mortgage securities usually are structured with two classes that receive different proportions of the interest and principal distribution of a pool of mortgage assets. A common type of stripped mortgage security will have one class receiving some of the interest and most of the principal from the mortgage assets, while the other class will receive most of the interest and the remainder of the principal. In the most extreme case, one class will receive all of the interest (the interest-only or "IO" class), while the other class will receive all of the principal (the principal-only or "PO" class). PO classes generate income through the accretion of the deep discount at which such securities are purchased, and, while PO classes do not receive periodic payments of interest, they receive monthly payments associated with scheduled amortization and principal prepayment from the mortgage assets underlying the PO class. The yield to maturity on a PO or an IO class security is extremely sensitive to the rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the related underlying mortgage assets. A slower than expected rate of principal payments may have an adverse effect on a PO-class security's yield to maturity. If the underlying mortgage assets experience slower than anticipated principal repayment, the Fund may fail to fully recoup its initial investment in these securities. Conversely, a rapid rate of principal payments may have a material adverse effect on an IO-class security's yield to maturity. If the underlying mortgage assets experience greater than anticipated prepayments of principal, the Fund may fail to fully recoup its initial investment in these securities.

The Fund may purchase stripped mortgage securities for income, or for hedging purposes to protect the Fund's portfolio against interest rate fluctuations. For example, since an IO class will tend to increase in value as interest rates rise, it may be utilized to hedge against a decrease in value of other fixed income securities in a rising interest rate environment.

Over-the-Counter Instruments

The trading of over-the-counter instruments subjects the Fund to a variety of risks including: (1) counterparty risk; (2) basis risk; (3) interest rate risk; (4) settlement risk; (5) legal risk; and (6) operational risk. Counterparty risk is the risk that the Fund's counterparties might default on their obligation to pay or perform generally on their obligations. The over-the-counter markets and some foreign (non-U.S.) markets are "principals' markets." That means that performance of the contract is the responsibility only of the individual firm or member on the other side of the trade and not any exchange or clearing corporation. Such "counterparty risk" is accentuated for contracts with longer maturities where events may intervene to prevent settlement, or where the Fund has concentrated its transactions with a single or small group of counterparties. Basis risk is the risk attributable to the movements in the spread between the derivative contract price and the future price of the underlying instrument. Interest rate risk is the general risk associated with movements in interest rates. Settlement risk is the risk that a settlement in a transfer system does not take place as expected. Legal risk is the risk that a transaction proves unenforceable in law or because it has been inadequately documented. Operational risk is the risk of unexpected losses arising from deficiencies in a firm's management information, support and control systems and procedures. Transactions in over-the-counter derivatives may involve other risks as well, as there is no exchange market on which to close out an open position. It may be impossible to liquidate an existing position, to assess the value of a position or to assess the exposure to risk.

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Recent Market Events.

The Fund could lose money over short periods due to short-term market movements and over longer periods during more prolonged market downturns. The value of a security or other instrument may decline due to changes in general market conditions, economic trends or events that are not specifically related to the issuer of the security or other instrument, or factors that affect a particular issuer or issuers, country, group of countries, region, market, industry, group of industries, sector or asset class. During a general market downturn, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Changes in market conditions and interest rates generally do not have the same impact on all types of securities and instruments.

Stresses associated with the 2008 financial crisis in the United States and global economies peaked approximately a decade ago, but periods of unusually high volatility in the financial markets and restrictive credit conditions, sometimes limited to a particular sector or a geography, continue to recur. Some countries, including the United States, have adopted and/or are considering the adoption of more protectionist trade policies, a move away from the tighter financial industry regulations that followed the financial crisis, and/or substantially reducing corporate taxes. The exact shape of these policies is still being considered, but the equity and debt markets may react strongly to expectations of change, which could increase volatility, especially if the market's expectations are not borne out. A rise in protectionist trade policies, and the possibility of changes to some international trade agreements, could affect the economies of many nations in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen at the present time. In addition, geopolitical and other risks, including environmental and public health, may add to instability in world economies and markets generally. Economies and financial markets throughout the world are becoming increasingly interconnected. As a result, whether or not the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in or with significant exposure to countries experiencing economic, political and/or financial difficulties, the value and liquidity of the Fund's investments may be negatively affected by such events.

COVID-19 has resulted in travel restrictions, closed international borders, enhanced health screenings at ports of entry and elsewhere, disruption of and delays in healthcare service preparation and delivery, prolonged quarantines, cancellations, business and school closings, supply chain disruptions, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty. The impact of COVID-19, and other infectious illness outbreaks that may arise in the future, could adversely affect the economies of many nations or the entire global economy, individual issuers and capital markets in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen. In addition, as a possible consequence of the measures taken in response to the spread of COVID-19 and the resulting market disruptions, volatility and liquidity concerns, the Fund may have difficulty in complying with the distribution requirements necessary for the Fund to maintain its status as a regulated investment company under the Internal Revenue Code.

Repurchase Agreements

The Fund may enter into repurchase agreements. In a repurchase agreement, an investor (such as the Fund) purchases a security (known as the "underlying security") from a securities dealer or bank. Any such dealer or bank must be deemed creditworthy by the Adviser. At that time, the bank or securities dealer agrees to repurchase the underlying security at a mutually agreed upon price on a designated future date. The repurchase price may be higher than the purchase price, the difference being income to the Fund, or the purchase and repurchase prices may be the same, with interest at an agreed upon rate due to the Fund on repurchase. In either case, the income to the Fund generally will be unrelated to the interest rate on the underlying securities. Repurchase agreements must be "fully collateralized," in that the market value of the underlying securities (including accrued interest) must at all times be equal to or greater than the repurchase price. Therefore, a repurchase agreement can be considered a loan collateralized by the underlying securities.

Repurchase agreements are generally for a short period of time, often less than a week, and will generally be used by the Fund to invest excess cash or as part of a temporary defensive strategy. Repurchase agreements that do not provide for payment within seven days will be treated as illiquid securities. In the event of a bankruptcy or other default by the seller of a repurchase agreement, the Fund could experience both delays in liquidating the underlying security and losses. These losses could result from: (a) possible decline in the value of the underlying security while the Fund is seeking to enforce its rights under the repurchase agreement; (b) possible reduced levels of income or lack of access to income during this period; and (c) expenses of enforcing its rights.

Securities Economically Tied to Non-U.S. Markets

An issuer of a security may be deemed to be economically tied to a particular country if it meets one or more of the following criteria: (i) the issuer or guarantor of the security is organized under the laws of, or maintains its principal place of business in, such country; (ii) the currency of settlement of the security is the currency of such country; (iii) the principal trading market for the security is in such country; (iv) during the issuer's most recent fiscal year, it derived at least 50% of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in such country or has at least 50% of its assets in that country; or (v) the issuer is included in an index that is representative of that country. In the event that an issuer may be considered to be economically tied to more than one country based on these criteria (for example, where the issuer is organized under the laws of one country but derives at least 50% of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold in another country), the Adviser may classify the issuer as being economically tied to any country that meets the above criteria in its discretion based on an assessment of the relevant facts and circumstances.

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Securities of Other Investment Companies

The Fund may invest in securities of other investment companies. The Fund's investments in an underlying portfolio of exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"), mutual funds and closed-end funds involve certain additional expenses and certain tax results, which would not be present in a direct investment in the underlying funds.

Business Development Companies

Business development companies ("BDCs") are regulated under the 1940 Act and are taxed as regulated investment companies ("RICs") under the Code. BDCs typically operate as publicly traded private equity firms that invest in early stage to mature private companies and small public companies. BDCs realize operating income when their investments are sold off, and therefore maintain complex organizational, operational, tax and compliance requirements, and must distribute at least 90% of their taxable earnings as dividends. Additionally, a BDC's expenses are not direct expenses paid by Fund shareholders and are not used to calculate the Fund's net asset value.

Closed-End Investment Companies

The Fund may invest its assets in "closed-end" investment companies (or "closed-end funds"), subject to the investment restrictions set forth below. Pursuant to recently enacted SEC rules, the Fund and any "affiliated persons," as defined by the 1940 Act, must comply with certain conditions in order to purchase more than 3% in the aggregate of the total outstanding voting stock of any closed-end fund ;however if the underlying investment company and/or the Fund has received an order for exemptive relief from the SEC in connection with such purchases, the Fund may rely on such relief to make such purchases until January 19, 2022, so long as the underlying investment company and the Fund take appropriate steps to comply with any conditions in such order. Shares of closed-end funds are typically offered to the public in a one-time initial public offering by a group of underwriters who retain a spread or underwriting commission of between 4% or 6% of the initial public offering price. Such securities are then listed for trading on an exchange such as the New York Stock Exchange, the American Stock Exchange, the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System (commonly known as "NASDAQ") and, in some cases, may be traded in other over-the-counter markets. Because the shares of closed-end funds cannot be redeemed upon demand to the issuer like the shares of an open-end investment company (such as the Fund), investors seek to buy and sell shares of closed-end funds in the secondary market.

The Fund generally will purchase shares of closed-end funds only in the secondary market. The Fund will incur normal brokerage costs on such purchases similar to the expenses the Fund would incur for the purchase of securities of any other type of issuer in the secondary market. The Fund may, however, also purchase securities of a closed-end fund in an initial public offering when, in the opinion of the Adviser, based on a consideration of the nature of the closed-end fund's proposed investments, the prevailing market conditions and the level of demand for such securities, they represent an attractive opportunity for growth of capital. The initial offering price typically will include a dealer spread, which may be higher than the applicable brokerage cost if the Fund purchased such securities in the secondary market.

The shares of many closed-end funds, after their initial public offering, frequently trade at a price per share, which is less than the net asset value per share, the difference representing the "market discount" of such shares. This market discount may be due in part to the investment objective of long-term appreciation, which is sought by many closed-end funds, as well as to the fact that the shares of closed-end funds are not redeemable by the holder upon demand to the issuer at the next determined net asset value but rather are subject to the principles of supply and demand in the secondary market. A relative lack of secondary market purchasers of closed-end fund shares also may contribute to such shares trading at a discount to their net asset value.

The Fund may invest in shares of closed-end funds that are trading at a discount to net asset value or at a premium to net asset value. There can be no assurance that the market discount on shares of any closed-end fund purchased by the Fund will ever decrease. In fact, it is possible that this market discount may increase and the Fund may suffer realized or unrealized capital losses due to further decline in the market price of the securities of such closed-end funds, thereby adversely affecting the net asset value of the Fund's shares. Similarly, there can be no assurance that any shares of a closed-end fund purchased by the Fund at a premium will continue to trade at a premium or that the premium will not decrease subsequent to a purchase of such shares by the Fund.

Closed-end funds may issue senior securities (including preferred stock and debt obligations) for the purpose of leveraging the closed-end fund's common shares in an attempt to enhance the current return to such closed-end fund's common shareholders. The Fund's investment in the common shares of closed-end funds that are financially leveraged may create an opportunity for greater total return on its investment, but at the same time may be expected to exhibit more volatility in market price and net asset value than an investment in shares of investment companies without a leveraged capital structure.

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Exchange-Traded Funds

ETFs are typically passively managed funds that track their related index and have the flexibility of trading like a security. They are managed by professionals and provide the investor with diversification, cost and tax efficiency, liquidity, marginability, are useful for hedging, have the ability to go long and short, and some provide quarterly dividends. Additionally, some ETFs are unit investment trusts (UITs) that have two markets. The primary market is where institutions swap "creation units" in block-multiples of 50,000 shares for in-kind securities and cash in the form of dividends. The secondary market is where individual investors can trade as little as a single share during trading hours on the exchange. This is different from open-ended mutual funds that are traded after hours once the net asset value (NAV) is calculated. ETFs share many similar risks with open-end and closed-end funds.

ETFs are shares issued by investment companies that are traded like traditional equity securities on a national stock exchange or the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System ("NASDAQ") National Market System. An investment in an ETF generally represents the same primary risks as an investment in a conventional fund (i.e., one that is not exchange traded) that has the same investment objectives, strategies and policies. The price of an ETF can fluctuate within a wide range, and the Fund could lose money investing in an ETF if the prices of the securities owned by the ETF go down. In addition, ETFs are subject to the following risks that do not apply to conventional open-end mutual funds: (i) the market price of the ETF's shares may trade at a discount to their net asset value; (ii) an active trading market for an ETF's shares may not develop or be maintained; or (iii) trading of an ETF's shares may be halted if the listing exchange's officials deem such action appropriate, the shares are de-listed from the exchange, or the activation of market-wide "circuit breakers" (which are tied to large decreases in stock prices) halts stock trading generally.

ETF shares are not individually redeemable from the ETF, except upon termination of the ETF. To redeem from the ETF, an investor must accumulate enough ETF shares to reconstitute a creation unit. Upon redemption of a creation unit, an investor will receive securities underlying the ETF and cash identical to the portfolio deposit required of an investor wishing to purchase a creation unit that day. The Fund may sell ETF shares through a broker dealer.

The price of an ETF's shares is derived from and based upon the securities held by the ETF. Accordingly, the level of risk involved in the purchase or sale of an ETF is similar to the risk involved in the purchase or sale of traditional common stock, with the exception that the pricing mechanism for ETFs generally is based on a basket of stocks. Disruptions in the markets for the securities underling ETFs purchased or sold by the Fund could result in losses on ETFs.

Open-End Investment Companies

The Fund may invest in shares of open-end investment companies. Pursuant to recently enacted SEC rules, the Fund and any "affiliated persons," as defined by the 1940 Act, must comply with certain conditions in order to purchase more than 3% in the aggregate of the total outstanding securities of any underlying underlying investment company; however if the underlying investment company and/or the Fund has received an order for exemptive relief from the SEC in connection with such purchases, the Fund may rely on such relief to make such purchases until January 19, 2022, so long as the underlying investment company and the Fund take appropriate steps to comply with any conditions in such order. Accordingly, when affiliated persons hold shares of any of the underlying funds, the Fund's ability to invest fully in shares of those funds is restricted, and the Adviser must then, in some instances, select alternative investments that would not have been its first preference. The 1940 Act also provides that an underlying fund whose shares are purchased by the Fund will be obligated to redeem shares held by the Fund only in an amount up to 1% of the underlying fund's outstanding securities during any period of less than 30 days. Shares held by the Fund in excess of 1% of an underlying fund's outstanding securities therefore, will be considered not readily marketable securities, which, together with other such securities, may not exceed 15% of any Fund's total assets. Under certain circumstances an underlying fund may determine to make payment of a redemption by the Fund wholly or partly by a distribution in kind of securities from its portfolio, in lieu of cash, in conformity with the rules of the SEC. In such cases, the Fund may hold securities distributed by an underlying fund until the Adviser determines that it is appropriate to dispose of such securities.

Investment decisions by the investment advisers of the underlying funds are made independently of the Fund and their adviser. Therefore, the investment adviser of one underlying fund may be purchasing shares of the same issuer whose shares are being sold by the adviser of the Fund. The result would be an indirect expense to the Fund without accomplishing any investment purpose.

Securities Options

The Fund may purchase and write (i.e., sell) put and call options. Such options may relate to particular securities or stock indices, and may or may not be listed on a domestic or foreign (non-U.S.) securities exchange and may or may not be issued by the Options Clearing Corporation. Options trading is a highly specialized activity that entails greater than ordinary investment risk. Options may be more

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volatile than the underlying instruments, and therefore, on a percentage basis, an investment in options may be subject to greater fluctuation than an investment in the underlying instruments themselves.

A call option for a particular security gives the purchaser of the option the right to buy, and the writer (seller) the obligation to sell, the underlying security at the stated exercise price at any time prior to the expiration of the option, regardless of the market price of the security. The premium paid to the writer is in consideration for undertaking the obligation under the option contract. A put option for a particular security gives the purchaser the right to sell the security at the stated exercise price at any time prior to the expiration date of the option, regardless of the market price of the security.

Stock index options are put options and call options on various stock indices. In most respects, they are identical to listed options on common stocks. The primary difference between stock options and index options occurs when index options are exercised. In the case of stock options, the underlying security, common stock, is delivered. However, upon the exercise of an index option, settlement does not occur by delivery of the securities comprising the index. The option holder who exercises the index option receives an amount of cash if the closing level of the stock index upon which the option is based is greater than, in the case of a call, or less than, in the case of a put, the exercise price of the option. This amount of cash is equal to the difference between the closing price of the stock index and the exercise price of the option expressed in dollars times a specified multiple. A stock index fluctuates with changes in the market value of the stocks included in the index. For example, some stock index options are based on a broad market index, such as the Standard & Poor's 500® Index or the Value Line Composite Index or a narrower market index, such as the Standard & Poor's 100®. Indices may also be based on an industry or market segment, such as the NYSE Arca Oil Index or the Computer and Business Equipment Index.

Options on stock indices are currently traded on the Chicago Board Options Exchange, the New York Stock Exchange, the American Stock Exchange, the Pacific Stock Exchange, the Philadelphia Stock Exchange and the NASDAQ PHLX.

The Fund's obligation to sell an instrument subject to a call option written by it, or to purchase an instrument subject to a put option written by it, may be terminated prior to the expiration date of the option by the Fund's execution of a closing purchase transaction, which is effected by purchasing on an exchange an option of the same series (i.e., same underlying instrument, exercise price and expiration date) as the option previously written. A closing purchase transaction will ordinarily be effected to realize a profit on an outstanding option, to prevent an underlying instrument from being called, to permit the sale of the underlying instrument or to permit the writing of a new option containing different terms on such underlying instrument. The cost of such a liquidation purchase plus transactions costs may be greater than the premium received upon the original option, in which event the Fund will have incurred a loss in the transaction. There is no assurance that a liquid secondary market will exist for any particular option. An option writer unable to effect a closing purchase transaction will not be able to sell the underlying instrument or liquidate the assets held in a segregated account, as described in the Cover Requirements section, until the option expires or the optioned instrument is delivered upon exercise. In such circumstances, the writer will be subject to the risk of market decline or appreciation in the instrument during such period.

If an option purchased by the Fund expires unexercised, the Fund realizes a loss equal to the premium paid. If the Fund enters into a closing sale transaction on an option purchased by it, the Fund will realize a gain if the premium received by the Fund on the closing transaction is more than the premium paid to purchase the option, or a loss if it is less. If an option written by the Fund expires on the stipulated expiration date or if the Fund enters into a closing purchase transaction, it will realize a gain (or loss if the cost of a closing purchase transaction exceeds the net premium received when the option is sold). If an option written by the Fund is exercised, the proceeds of the sale will be increased by the net premium originally received and the Fund will realize a gain or loss.

Certain Risks Regarding Options

There are several risks associated with transactions in options. For example, there are significant differences between the securities and options markets that could result in an imperfect correlation between these markets, causing a given transaction not to achieve its objectives. In addition, a liquid secondary market for particular options, whether traded over-the-counter or on an exchange, may be absent for reasons which include the following: there may be insufficient trading interest in certain options; restrictions may be imposed by an exchange on opening transactions or closing transactions or both; trading halts, suspensions or other restrictions may be imposed with respect to particular classes or series of options or underlying securities or currencies; unusual or unforeseen circumstances may interrupt normal operations on an exchange; the facilities of an exchange or the Options Clearing Corporation may not at all times be adequate to handle current trading value; or one or more exchanges could, for economic or other reasons, decide or be compelled at some future date to discontinue the trading of options (or a particular class or series of options), in which event the secondary market on that exchange (or in that class or series of options) would cease to exist, although outstanding options that had been issued by the Options Clearing Corporation as a result of trades on that exchange would continue to be exercisable in accordance with their terms.

Successful use by the Fund of options on stock indices will be subject to the ability of the Adviser to correctly predict movements in the directions of the stock market. This requires different skills and techniques than predicting changes in the prices of individual securities. In addition, the Fund's ability to effectively hedge all or a portion of the securities in its portfolio, in anticipation of or during a market decline, through transactions in put options on stock indices, depends on the degree to

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which price movements in the underlying index correlate with the price movements of the securities held by the Fund. Inasmuch as the Fund's securities will not duplicate the components of an index, the correlation will not be perfect. Consequently, the Fund bears the risk that the prices of its securities being hedged will not move in the same amount as the prices of its put options on the stock indices. It is also possible that there may be a negative correlation between the index and the Fund's securities that would result in a loss on both such securities and the options on stock indices acquired by the Fund.

The hours of trading for options may not conform to the hours during which the underlying securities are traded. To the extent that the options markets close before the markets for the underlying securities, significant price and rate movements can take place in the underlying markets that cannot be reflected in the options markets. The purchase of options is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The purchase of stock index options involves the risk that the premium and transaction costs paid by the Fund in purchasing an option will be lost as a result of unanticipated movements in prices of the securities comprising the stock index on which the option is based.

There is no assurance that a liquid secondary market on an options exchange will exist for any particular option, or at any particular time, and for some options no secondary market on an exchange or elsewhere may exist. If the Fund is unable to close out a call option on securities that it has written before the option is exercised, the Fund may be required to purchase the optioned securities in order to satisfy its obligation under the option to deliver such securities. If the Fund is unable to effect a closing sale transaction with respect to options on securities that it has purchased, it would have to exercise the option in order to realize any profit and would incur transaction costs upon the purchase and sale of the underlying securities.

Options on Futures Contracts

The Fund may purchase and sell options on the same types of futures in which it may invest. Options on futures are similar to options on underlying instruments except that options on futures give the purchaser the right, in return for the premium paid, to assume a position in a futures contract (a long position if the option is a call and a short position if the option is a put), rather than to purchase or sell the futures contract, at a specified exercise price at any time during the period of the option. Upon exercise of the option, the delivery of the futures position by the writer of the option to the holder of the option will be accompanied by the delivery of the accumulated balance in the writer's futures margin account which represents the amount by which the market price of the futures contract, at exercise, exceeds (in the case of a call) or is less than (in the case of a put) the exercise price of the option on the futures contract. Purchasers of options who fail to exercise their options prior to the exercise date suffer a loss of the premium paid.

Dealer Options

The Fund may engage in transactions involving dealer options as well as exchange-traded options. Certain additional risks are specific to dealer options. While the Fund might look to a clearing corporation to exercise exchange-traded options, if the Fund were to purchase a dealer option it would need to rely on the dealer from which it purchased the option to perform if the option were exercised. Failure by the dealer to do so would result in the loss of the premium paid by the Fund as well as loss of the expected benefit of the transaction.

Exchange-traded options generally have a continuous liquid market while dealer options may not. Consequently, the Fund may generally be able to realize the value of a dealer option it has purchased only by exercising or reselling the option to the dealer who issued it. Similarly, when the Fund writes a dealer option, the Fund may generally be able to close out the option prior to its expiration only by entering into a closing purchase transaction with the dealer to whom the Fund originally wrote the option. While the Fund will seek to enter into dealer options only with dealers who will agree to and which are expected to be capable of entering into closing transactions with the Fund, there can be no assurance that the Fund will at any time be able to liquidate a dealer option at a favorable price at any time prior to expiration. Unless the Fund, as a covered dealer call option writer, is able to effect a closing purchase transaction, it will not be able to liquidate securities (or other assets) used as cover until the option expires or is exercised. In the event of insolvency of the other party, the Fund may be unable to liquidate a dealer option. With respect to options written by the Fund, the inability to enter into a closing transaction may result in material losses to the Fund. For example, because the Fund must maintain a secured position with respect to any call option on a security it writes, the Fund may not sell the assets, which it has segregated to secure the position while it is obligated under the option. This requirement may impair the Fund's ability to sell portfolio securities at a time when such sale might be advantageous.

The Staff of the SEC has taken the position that purchased dealer options are illiquid securities. The Fund may treat the cover used for written dealer options as liquid if the dealer agrees that the Fund may repurchase the dealer options they have written for a maximum price to be calculated by a predetermined formula. In such cases, the dealer option would be considered illiquid only to the extent the maximum purchase price under the formula exceeds the intrinsic value of the option. Accordingly, the Fund will treat dealer options as subject to the Fund's limitation on illiquid securities. If the SEC changes its position on the liquidity of dealer options, the Fund will change their treatment of such instruments accordingly.

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Spread Transactions

The Fund may purchase covered spread options from securities dealers. These covered spread options are not presently exchange-listed or exchange-traded. The purchase of a spread option gives the Fund the right to put securities that it owns at a fixed dollar spread or fixed yield spread in relationship to another security that the Fund does not own, but which is used as a benchmark. The risk to the Fund, in addition to the risks of dealer options described above, is the cost of the premium paid as well as any transaction costs. The purchase of spread options will be used to protect the Fund against adverse changes in prevailing credit quality spreads, i.e., the yield spread between high quality and lower quality securities. This protection is provided only during the life of the spread options.

Swaps

The swap market has grown substantially in recent years with a large number of banks and investment banking firms acting both as principals and as agents utilizing standardized swap documentation. As a result, the swap market has become relatively liquid in comparison with the markets for other similar instruments that are traded in the over-the-counter market. The Adviser, under the supervision of the Board, is responsible for determining and monitoring the liquidity of Fund transactions in swap agreements. The use of equity swaps is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions.

Swap Agreements

Swap agreements are typically two-party, uncleared contracts entered into primarily by institutional investors for periods ranging from a day to more than one year. In a standard "swap" transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments. The gross returns to be exchanged or "swapped" between the parties are calculated with respect to a "notional amount," i.e., the return on or increase in value of a particular dollar amount invested in a "basket" of securities representing a particular index. Most swap agreements entered into by the Fund calculate the obligations of the parties to the agreement on a "net basis." Consequently, the Fund's current obligations (or rights) under a swap agreement will generally be equal only to the net amount to be paid or received under the agreement based on the relative values of the positions held by each party to the agreement (the "net amount"). Payments may be made at the conclusion of a swap agreement or periodically during its term. Swap agreements often do not involve the delivery of securities or other underlying assets. Accordingly, if a swap is entered into on a net basis, if the other party to a swap agreement defaults, the Fund's risk of loss consists of the net amount of payments that the Fund is contractually entitled to receive, if any. The net amount of the excess, if any, of the Fund's obligations over its entitlements with respect to a swap agreement entered into on a net basis will be accrued daily and an amount of cash or liquid asset having an aggregate NAV at least equal to the accrued excess will be maintained in an account with the Fund's custodian that satisfies the 1940 Act. The Fund will also establish and maintain such accounts with respect to its total obligations under any swaps that are not entered into on a net basis. Obligations under swap agreements so covered will not be construed to be "senior securities" for purposes of the Fund's investment restriction concerning senior securities. Because most swap agreements are two-party contracts and may have terms of greater than seven days, swap agreements may be considered to be illiquid for the Fund illiquid investment limitations. The Fund will not enter into any swap agreement unless the Adviser believes that the other party to the transaction is creditworthy. The Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap agreement in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap agreement counterparty.

The Fund may enter into a swap agreement in circumstances where the Adviser believes that it may be more cost effective or practical than buying the underlying securities or a futures contract or an option on such securities. The counterparty to any swap agreement will typically be a bank, investment banking firm or broker/dealer. The counterparty will generally agree to pay the Fund the amount, if any, by which the notional amount of the swap agreement would have increased in value had it been invested in the particular stocks, futures contracts or other underlying assets represented in the index, plus the dividends that would have been received on those instruments. The Fund will agree to pay to the counterparty a floating rate of interest on the notional amount of the swap agreement plus the amount, if any, by which the notional amount would have decreased in value had it been invested in such stocks, futures contracts or other underlying assets. Therefore, the return to the Fund on any swap agreement should be the gain or loss on the notional amount plus dividends on the stocks less the interest paid by the Fund on the notional amount.

The Fund may enter into total return swap agreements. Total return swap agreements are contracts in which one party agrees to make periodic payments based on the change in market value of underlying assets, which may include a specified security, futures contract, basket of securities or futures contracts, defined portfolios of bonds, loans and mortgages, or securities indices during the specified period, in return for periodic payments based on a fixed or variable interest rate or the total return from other underlying assets. Total return swap agreements may be used to obtain exposure to a security, commodity or market without owning or taking physical custody of such security, commodity or market. Total return swap agreements may effectively add leverage to the Fund's portfolio because, in addition to its total net assets, the Fund would be subject to

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investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap. Total return swaps are a mechanism for the user to accept the economic benefits of asset ownership without utilizing the balance sheet. The other leg of the swap, usually the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR), is spread to reflect the non-balance sheet nature of the product. Total return swaps can be designed with any underlying asset agreed between two parties. Typically no notional amounts are exchanged with total return swaps. Total return swap agreements entail the risk that a party will default on its payment obligations to the Fund thereunder. Swap agreements also entail the risk that the Fund will not be able to meet its obligation to the counterparty. Generally, the Fund will enter into total return swaps on a net basis (i.e., the two payment streams are netted out with the Fund receiving or paying, as the case may be, only the net amount of the two payments).

Credit Default Swaps

In a credit default swap, one party makes a stream of payments to another party in exchange for the right to receive a specified return in the event of a default by a third party, typically an emerging country, on its obligation. The Fund may use credit default swaps to provide a measure of protection against defaults of sovereign issuers (i.e., to reduce risk where the Fund owns or has exposure to the sovereign issuer) and may use credit default swaps to take an active long or short position with respect to the likelihood of a particular issuer's default. In connection with these agreements, cash or liquid securities may be set aside as collateral by the Fund's custodian in accordance with the terms of the swap agreement. The Fund earns interest on cash set aside as collateral. Swaps are marked to market daily based upon quotations from market makers and the change in value, if any, is recorded as unrealized gain or loss. These financial instruments are not actively traded on financial markets. The values assigned to these instruments are based upon the best available information and because of the uncertainty of the valuation, these values may differ significantly from the values that would have been realized had a ready market for these instruments existed, and the differences could be material. Payments received or made at the end of the measurement period are recorded as realized gain or loss. Entering into these agreements involves, to varying degrees, elements of credit, market, and documentation risk. Such risks involve the possibility that there will be no liquid market for these agreements, that the counterparty to the agreements may default on its obligation to perform or disagree as to the meaning of contractual terms in the agreements, and that there may be unfavorable changes in interest rates.

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act") and related regulatory developments requires the clearing and exchange-trading of certain interest rate swaps and credit default swaps. The Dodd-Frank Act will ultimately require the clearing of many additional types of OTC derivative instruments that the CFTC and SEC recently defined as "swaps" including non-deliverable foreign (non-U.S.) exchange forwards, OTC foreign (non-U.S.) exchange options and swaptions. Mandatory exchange-trading and clearing will take place on a phased-in basis based on type of market participant and CFTC approval of contracts for central clearing. In addition, derivatives will be subject to margin requirements and swap dealers will potentially be required to collect margin from the portfolio with respect to such derivatives, which may result in the Fund being subject to margin calls or increased collateral requirements from counterparties. The Adviser will continue to monitor developments in this area, particularly to the extent regulatory changes affect the Fund's ability to enter into swap agreements.

Temporary Defensive Position

In anticipation of or in response to adverse market, economic, political or other conditions, the Fund may take temporary defensive positions (up to 100% of its assets) in cash, cash equivalents and short term U.S. government securities. If the Fund were to take a temporary defensive position, its opportunity to achieve upside return may be limited; however, the ability to be fully defensive is an integral part of achieving The Fund's investment objective.

Time Deposits and Variable Rate Notes

The Fund may invest in fixed time deposits, whether or not subject to withdrawal penalties. The commercial paper obligations which The Fund may buy are unsecured and may include variable rate notes. The nature and terms of a variable rate note (i.e., a "Master Note") permit The Fund to invest fluctuating amounts at varying rates of interest pursuant to a direct arrangement between the Fund as lender, and the issuer, as borrower. It permits daily changes in the amounts borrowed. The Fund has the right at any time to increase, up to the full amount stated in the note agreement, or to decrease the amount outstanding under the note. The issuer may prepay at any time and without penalty any part of or the full amount of the note. The note may or may not be backed by one or more bank letters of credit. Because these notes are direct lending arrangements between the Fund and the issuer, it is not generally contemplated that they will be traded; moreover, there is currently no secondary market for them. Except as specifically provided in the Prospectus, there is no limitation on the type of issuer from whom these notes may be purchased; however, in connection with such purchase and on an ongoing basis, the Adviser will consider the earning power, cash flow and other liquidity ratios of the issuer, and its ability to pay principal and

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interest on demand, including a situation in which all holders of such notes made demand simultaneously. Variable rate notes are subject to the Fund's investment restriction on illiquid securities unless such notes can be put back to the issuer on demand within seven days.

Trading in Futures Contracts

A futures contract provides for the future sale by one party and purchase by another party of a specified amount of a specific financial instrument (e.g., units of a stock index) for a specified price, date, time and place designated at the time the contract is made. Brokerage fees are incurred when a futures contract is bought or sold and margin deposits must be maintained. Entering into a contract to buy is commonly referred to as buying or purchasing a contract or holding a long position. Entering into a contract to sell is commonly referred to as selling a contract or holding a short position.

Unlike when the Fund purchases or sells a security, no price would be paid or received by the Fund upon the purchase or sale of a futures contract. Upon entering into a futures contract, and to maintain the Fund's open positions in futures contracts, the Fund would be required to deposit with its custodian or futures broker in a segregated account in the name of the futures broker an amount of cash, U.S. Government securities, suitable money market instruments, or other liquid securities, known as "initial margin."

The margin required for a particular futures contract is set by the exchange on which the contract is traded, and may be significantly modified from time to time by the exchange during the term of the contract. Futures contracts are customarily purchased and sold on margins that may range upward from less than 5% of the value of the contract being traded.

If the price of an open futures contract changes (by increase in underlying instrument or index in the case of a sale or by decrease in the case of a purchase) so that the loss on the futures contract reaches a point at which the margin on deposit does not satisfy margin requirements, the broker will require an increase in the margin. However, if the value of a position increases because of favorable price changes in the futures contract so that the margin deposit exceeds the required margin, the broker will pay the excess to the Fund.

These subsequent payments, called "variation margin," to and from the futures broker, are made on a daily basis as the price of the underlying assets fluctuate making the long and short positions in the futures contract more or less valuable, a process known as "marking to the market." The Fund expects to earn interest income on its margin deposits.

Although certain futures contracts, by their terms, require actual future delivery of and payment for the underlying instruments, in practice most futures contracts are usually closed out before the delivery date. Closing out an open futures contract purchase or sale is effected by entering into an offsetting futures contract sale or purchase, respectively, for the same aggregate amount of the identical underlying instrument or index and the same delivery date. If the offsetting purchase price is less than the original sale price, the Fund realizes a gain; if it is more, the Fund realizes a loss. Conversely, if the offsetting sale price is more than the original purchase price, the Fund realizes a gain; if it is less, the Fund realizes a loss. The transaction costs must also be included in these calculations. There can be no assurance, however, that the Fund will be able to enter into an offsetting transaction with respect to a particular futures contract at a particular time. If the Fund is not able to enter into an offsetting transaction, the Fund will continue to be required to maintain the margin deposits on the futures contract.

For example, one contract in the Financial Times Stock Exchange 100 Index future is a contract to buy 25 pounds sterling multiplied by the level of the UK Financial Times 100 Share Index on a given future date. Settlement of a stock index futures contract may or may not be in the underlying instrument or index. If not in the underlying instrument or index, then settlement will be made in cash, equivalent over time to the difference between the contract price and the actual price of the underlying asset at the time the stock index futures contract expires.

The Fund's futures contracts may be subject to periods of illiquidity because of market conditions, regulatory considerations and other reasons. For example, commodity exchanges limit fluctuations in certain futures contract prices during a single day by regulations referred to as "daily limits." During a single day, no trades may be executed at prices beyond the daily limit. Once the price of a futures contract for a particular commodity has increased or decreased by an amount equal to the daily limit, positions in the commodity futures contracts can neither be taken nor liquidated unless the traders are willing to effect trades at or within the limit. Futures contract prices have occasionally moved the daily limit for several consecutive days with little or no trading. Such market conditions could prevent the Fund from promptly liquidating its futures contracts.

United States Government Agency

The Fund may invest in securities issued by United States Government Agencies. These consist of fixed income securities issued by agencies and instrumentalities of the United States Government, including the various types of instruments currently outstanding or which may be offered in the future. Agencies include, among others, the Federal Housing Administration, Government National Mortgage Association ("GNMA"), Export-Import Bank of the United States, Maritime Administration, and General Services Administration. Instrumentalities include, for example, each of the Federal Home Loan Banks, the National Bank for Cooperatives, the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation ("FHLMC"), the Farm Credit Banks, the Federal National Mortgage Association ("FNMA"),

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and the United States Postal Service. These securities are either: (i) backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government (e.g., United States Treasury Bills); (ii) guaranteed by the United States Treasury (e.g., GNMA mortgage-backed securities); (iii) supported by the issuing agency's or instrumentality's right to borrow from the United States Treasury (e.g., FNMA Discount Notes); or (iv) supported only by the issuing agency's or instrumentality's own credit (e.g., Tennessee Valley Association).

Government-related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government) include FNMA and FHLMC. FNMA is a government-sponsored corporation owned entirely by private stockholders. It is subject to general regulation by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. FNMA purchases conventional (i.e., not insured or guaranteed by any government agency) residential mortgages from a list of approved seller/servicers which include state and federally chartered savings and loan associations, mutual savings banks, commercial banks and credit unions and mortgage bankers. Pass-through securities issued by FNMA are guaranteed as to timely payment of principal and interest by FNMA but are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government.

FHLMC was created by Congress in 1970 for the purpose of increasing the availability of mortgage credit for residential housing. It is a government-sponsored corporation formerly owned by the twelve Federal Home Loan Banks and now owned entirely by private stockholders. FHLMC issues Participation Certificates ("PC's"), which represent interests in conventional mortgages from FHLMC's national portfolio. FHLMC guarantees the timely payment of interest and ultimate collection of principal, but PCs are not backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government. Commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, private mortgage insurance companies, mortgage bankers and other secondary market issuers also create pass-through pools of conventional residential mortgage loans. Such issuers may, in addition, be the originators and/or servicers of the underlying mortgage loans as well as the guarantors of the mortgage-related securities. Pools created by such nongovernmental issuers generally offer a higher rate of interest than government and government-related pools because there are no direct or indirect government or agency guarantees of payments in the former pools. However, timely payment of interest and principal of these pools may be supported by various forms of insurance or guarantees, including individual loan, title, pool and hazard insurance and letters of credit. The insurance and guarantees are issued by governmental entities, private insurers and the mortgage poolers.

United States Government Obligations

The Fund may invest in United States Government Obligations. These consist of various types of marketable securities issued by the United States Treasury, i.e., bills, notes and bonds. Such securities are direct obligations of the United States government and differ mainly in the length of their maturity. Treasury bills, the most frequently issued marketable government security, have a maturity of up to one year and are issued on a discount basis.

Receipts

Interests in separately traded interest and principal component parts of U.S. government obligations that are issued by banks or brokerage firms and are created by depositing U.S. government obligations into a special account at a custodian bank. The custodian holds the interest and principal payments for the benefit of the registered owners of the certificates or receipts. The custodian arranges for the issuance of the certificates or receipts evidencing ownership and maintains the register. Treasury Receipts ("TRs") and Separately Traded Registered Interest and Principal Securities ("STRIPS") are interests in accounts sponsored by the U.S. Treasury. Receipts are sold as zero coupon securities.

U.S. Government Zero Coupon Securities

STRIPS and receipts are sold as zero coupon securities, that is, fixed income securities that have been stripped of their unmatured interest coupons. Zero coupon securities are sold at a (usually substantial) discount and redeemed at face value at their maturity date without interim cash payments of interest or principal. The amount of this discount is accreted over the life of the security, and the accretion constitutes the income earned on the security for both accounting and tax purposes. Because of these features, the market prices of zero coupon securities are generally more volatile than the market prices of securities that have similar maturity but that pay interest periodically. Zero coupon securities are likely to respond to a greater degree to interest rate changes than are non-zero coupon securities with similar maturity and credit qualities.

U.S. Treasury Obligations

U.S. Treasury obligations consist of bills, notes and bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury and separately traded interest and principal component parts of such obligations that are transferable through the federal book-entry system known as STRIPS and TRs.

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When-Issued, Forward Commitments and Delayed Settlements

The Fund may purchase and sell securities on a when-issued, forward commitment or delayed settlement basis. In this event, the Custodian (as defined under the section entitled "Custodian") will segregate liquid assets equal to the amount of the commitment in a separate account as discussed in the Cover Requirements section. Normally, the Custodian will set aside portfolio securities to satisfy a purchase commitment. In such a case, the Fund may be required subsequently to segregate additional assets in order to assure that the value of the account remains equal to the amount of the Fund's commitment. It may be expected that the Fund's net assets will fluctuate to a greater degree when it sets aside portfolio securities to cover such purchase commitments than when it sets aside cash.

The Fund do not intend to engage in these transactions for speculative purposes but only in furtherance of its investment objectives. Because the Fund will segregate liquid assets to satisfy its purchase commitments in the manner described, the Fund's liquidity and the ability of the Adviser to manage them may be affected in the event the Fund's forward commitments, commitments to purchase when-issued securities and delayed settlements ever exceeded 15% of the value of its net assets.

The Fund will purchase securities on a when-issued, forward commitment or delayed settlement basis only with the intention of completing the transaction. If deemed advisable as a matter of investment strategy, however, the Fund may dispose of or renegotiate a commitment after it is entered into, and may sell securities it has committed to purchase before those securities are delivered to the Fund on the settlement date. In these cases the Fund may realize a taxable capital gain or loss. When the Fund engages in when-issued, forward commitment and delayed settlement transactions, it relies on the other party to consummate the trade. Failure of such party to do so may result in the Fund incurring a loss or missing an opportunity to obtain a price credited to be advantageous.

The market value of the securities underlying a when-issued purchase, forward commitment to purchase securities, or a delayed settlement and any subsequent fluctuations in their market value is taken into account when determining the market value of the Fund starting on the day the Fund agrees to purchase the securities. The Fund does not earn interest on the securities it has committed to purchase until it has paid for and delivered on the settlement date.

INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS

The Fund has adopted the following investment restrictions that may not be changed without approval by a "majority of the outstanding shares" of the Fund which, as used in this SAI, means the vote of the lesser of (a) 67% or more of the shares of the Fund represented at a meeting, if the holders of more than 50% of the outstanding shares of the Fund are present or represented by proxy, or (b) more than 50% of the outstanding shares of the Fund.

1. Diversification. With respect to 75% of its total assets, The Fund[1] may not purchase any security (other than U.S. Government Securities or securities of other investment companies) if as a result: (i) more than 5% of the Fund's total assets immediately after and as the result of such purchase would be invested in the securities of any one issuer, or (ii) the Fund would hold more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of a single issuer.

2. Borrowing Money. The Fund may not borrow money, except to the extent permitted under applicable securities laws.

3. Senior Securities. The Fund may not issue senior securities, except to the extent permitted under applicable securities laws

4. Underwriting. The Fund may not act as an underwriter of securities of other issuers, except to the extent that the Fund may be considered an underwriter under applicable securities laws in the disposition of portfolio securities or in the purchase of securities directly from the issuer thereof.

5. Concentration. The Fund may not purchase any security (other than U.S. Government Securities or securities of other investment companies) if as a result more than 25% of the Fund's total assets, taken at market value at the time of investment, would be invested in the securities of issuers whose principal business activities are in the same industry.

6. Real Estate. The Fund may not purchase or sell real estate unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments, but this policy shall not prevent the Fund from investing in securities or other instruments backed by real estate (e.g., REITs) or in securities of issuers engaged in the real estate business.

7. Commodities. The Fund may purchase or sell commodities to the extent permitted by applicable law from time to time.

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8. Loans. The Fund may not make loans, except to the extent permitted under the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, and any applicable exemptive relief.

THE FOLLOWING ARE ADDITIONAL INVESTMENT LIMITATIONS OF THE FUND. THE FOLLOWING RESTRICTIONS ARE DESIGNATED AS NON-FUNDAMENTAL AND MAY BE CHANGED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE TRUST WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF SHAREHOLDERS.

1. Pledging. The Fund will not mortgage, pledge, hypothecate or in any manner transfer, as security for indebtedness, any assets of the Fund except as may be necessary in connection with borrowings described in limitation (1) above. Margin deposits, security interests, liens and collateral arrangements with respect to transactions involving options, futures contracts, short sales and other permitted investments and techniques are not deemed to be a mortgage, pledge or hypothecation of assets for purposes of this limitation.

2. Borrowing. The Fund will not purchase any security while borrowings representing more than one third of its total assets are outstanding.

3. Margin Purchases. The Fund may not purchase securities on margin, except for use of short-term credit necessary for clearance of purchases and sales of portfolio securities, but it may make margin deposits in connection with covered transactions in options, futures, options on futures and short positions. For purposes of this restriction, the posting of margin deposits or other forms of collateral in connection with swap agreements is not considered purchasing securities on margin.

4. Illiquid Investments. The Fund will not hold 15% or more of its net assets in securities for which there are legal or contractual restrictions on resale and other illiquid securities.

If a restriction on the Fund's investments is adhered to at the time an investment is made, a subsequent change in the percentage of Fund assets invested in certain securities or other instruments, or change in average duration of the Fund's investment portfolio, resulting from changes in the value of the Fund's total assets, will not be considered a violation of the restriction; provided, however, that the asset coverage requirement applicable to borrowings shall be maintained in the manner contemplated by applicable law.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS

The Trust has adopted policies and procedures that govern the disclosure of The Fund's portfolio holdings. These policies and procedures are designed to ensure that such disclosure is in the best interests of The Fund's shareholders.

It is the Trust's policy to: (1) ensure that any disclosure of portfolio holdings information is in the best interest of Trust shareholders; (2) protect the confidentiality of portfolio holdings information; (3) have procedures in place to guard against personal trading based on the information; and (4) ensure that the disclosure of portfolio holdings information does not create conflicts between the interests of the Trust's shareholders and those of the Trust's affiliates.

The Fund discloses its portfolio holdings by mailing its annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders approximately two months after the end of the fiscal year and semi-annual period. In addition, The Fund discloses its portfolio holdings reports on Form N-CSR and Form N-PORT two months after the end of each quarter/semi-annual period.

The Fund may choose to make portfolio holdings available to rating agencies such as Lipper, Morningstar or Bloomberg earlier and more frequently on a confidential basis.

Under limited circumstances, as described below, The Fund's portfolio holdings may be disclosed to, or known by, certain third parties in advance of their filing with the SEC on Form N-CSR or Form N-PORT. In each case, a determination has been made by the Trust's Chief Compliance Officer that such advance disclosure is supported by a legitimate business purpose of The Fund and that the recipient is subject to a duty to keep the information confidential.

· The Adviser. Personnel of the Adviser, including personnel responsible for managing the Fund's portfolio, may have full daily access to Fund portfolio holdings since that information is necessary in order for the Adviser to provide management, administrative, and investment services to the Fund. As required for purposes of analyzing the impact of existing and future market changes on the prices, availability, demand and liquidity of such securities, as well as for the assistance of the portfolio managers in the trading of such securities, personnel of the Adviser may also release and discuss certain portfolio holdings with various broker-dealers.

· Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC is the transfer agent, fund accountant and administrator for The Fund; therefore, its personnel have full daily access to The Fund's portfolio holdings since that information is necessary in order for them to provide the agreed-upon services for the Trust.

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· The Bank of New York Mellon is custodian for The Fund; therefore, its personnel have full daily access to The Fund's portfolio holdings since that information is necessary in order for them to provide the agreed-upon services for the Trust.

· Grant Thornton LLP is The Fund's independent registered public accounting firm; therefore, its personnel have access to The Fund's portfolio holdings in connection with auditing of The Fund's annual financial statements and preparation of The Fund's tax returns.

· Blank Rome LLP is counsel to The Fund; therefore, its personnel have access to The Fund's portfolio holdings in connection with review of The Fund's annual and semi-annual shareholder reports and SEC filings.

Additions to List of Approved Recipients. The Fund's Chief Compliance Officer is the person responsible, and whose prior approval is required, for any disclosure of The Fund's portfolio securities at any time or to any persons other than those described above. In such cases, the recipient must have a legitimate business need for the information in connection with the operation or administration of The Fund, as determined by the Trust's Chief Compliance Officer, and must be subject to a duty to keep the information confidential. There are no ongoing arrangements in place with respect to the disclosure of portfolio holdings. In no event shall The Fund, the Adviser or any other party receive any direct or indirect compensation in connection with the disclosure of information about The Fund's portfolio holdings.

Compliance with Portfolio Holdings Disclosure Procedures. The Trusts' Chief Compliance Officer will report periodically to the Board with respect to compliance with The Fund's portfolio holdings disclosure procedures, and from time to time will provide the Board any updates to the portfolio holdings disclosure policies and procedures.

There is no assurance that the Trust's policies on disclosure of portfolio holdings will protect The Fund from the potential misuse of holdings information by individuals or firms in possession of that information.

MANAGEMENT

The business of the Trust is managed under the direction of the Board in accordance with the Agreement and Declaration of Trust and the Trust's By-laws (collectively, the "Governing Documents"), which have been filed with the SEC and are available upon request. The Board consists of four individuals, all of whom are not "interested persons" (as defined under the 1940 Act) of the Trust and the Adviser ("Independent Trustees"). Pursuant to the Governing Documents of the Trust, the Trustees shall elect officers including, but not limited to, a President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, and a Chief Compliance Officer. The Board retains the power to conduct, operate and carry on the business of the Trust and has the power to incur and pay any expenses, which, in the opinion of the Board, are necessary or incidental to carry out any of the Trust's purposes. The Trustees, officers, employees and agents of the Trust, when acting in such capacities, shall not be subject to any personal liability except for his or her own bad faith, willful misfeasance, gross negligence or reckless disregard of his or her duties.

Board Leadership Structure. The Board is led by Mark Gersten, who has served as the Chairman of the Board since the Trust was first registered with the SEC in 2012. Under the Trust's Agreement and Declaration of Trust and By-Laws, the Chairman of the Board is responsible for (a) presiding at Board meetings, (b) calling special meetings on an as-needed basis, and (c) execution and administration of Trust policies, including (i) setting the agendas for Board meetings and (ii) providing information to Board members in advance of each Board meeting and between Board meetings. Generally, the Trust believes it best to have a non-executive Chairman of the Board, who together with the President (principal executive officer), are seen by our shareholders, business partners and other stakeholders as providing strong leadership. The Trust believes that its Chairman, the independent chair of the Audit Committee, and, as an entity, the full Board, provide effective leadership that is in the best interests of the Trust, The Fund and each shareholder.

Board Risk Oversight. The Board is comprised entirely of Independent Trustees and has established an Audit Committee with a separate chair. The Board is responsible for overseeing risk management, and the full Board regularly engages in discussions of risk management and receives compliance reports that inform its oversight of risk management from its Chief Compliance Officer at quarterly meetings and on an ad hoc basis, when and if necessary. The Audit Committee considers financial and reporting risk within its area of responsibilities. Generally, the Board believes that its oversight of material risks is adequately maintained through the compliance-reporting chain where the Chief Compliance Officer is the primary recipient and communicator of such risk-related information.

Trustee Qualifications. Generally, the Trust believes that each Trustee is competent to serve because of their individual overall merits including: (i) experience, (ii) qualifications, (iii) attributes and (iv) skills. Mark Garbin has over 30 years of experience in corporate balance sheet and income statement risk management for large asset managers. Mr. Garbin has extensive derivatives experience and has provided consulting services to alternative asset managers. Mr. Garbin holds both a Chartered Financial Analyst ("CFA") and Professional Risk Manager ("PRM") designation and has earned and holds advanced degrees in international business, negotiation and derivatives. Mark Gersten has over 35 years of business experience in the investment management business with a focus on mutual funds and alternative funds. He serves as a member of other mutual fund boards outside of the Fund Complex and possesses a strong understanding of the regulatory framework under which investment companies must operate based on his service to this board and extensive experience administering mutual funds. Mr. Gersten is a certified public accountant and holds an MBA in accounting. Neil

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Kaufman has over 35 years of experience as a corporate and securities attorney and possesses a deep understanding of the securities industry in general and financial statements in particular. Mr. Kaufman has previously served as the Chairman of a NASDAQ-listed technology company and the Chairman of the Banking & Securities Law committee of the Nassau County Bar Association. Anita Krug has 10 years of experience as an attorney advising investment companies and investment advisory firms, particularly those managing hedge funds. She also has extensive experience as a law professor whose scholarship focuses on investment advisers, hedge funds and mutual funds. The Trust does not believe any one factor is determinative in assessing a Trustee's qualifications, but the collective experience of each Trustee makes them well qualified.

Trustees and Officers. The Trustees and officers of the Trust, together with information as to their principal business occupations during the past five years and other information, are shown below. The business address of each Trustee and Officer is 225 Pictoria Drive, Suite 450, Cincinnati, OH 45246. All correspondence to the Trustees and Officers should be directed to c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 541150, Omaha, Nebraska 68154.

Independent Trustees *

Name, Address,

Year of Birth

Position(s) Held with Registrant

Term and Length Served

Principal Occupation(s) During Past 5 Years

Number of Portfolios Overseen In The Fund Complex**

Other Directorships Held During Past 5 Years

Mark Garbin

Year of Birth: 1951

Trustee

Indefinite, Since 2012

Managing Principal, Coherent Capital Management LLC (since 2008) 1 Northern Lights Fund Trust (since 2013); Northern Lights Variable Trust (since 2013); Forethought Variable Insurance Trust (since 2013); OHA Mortgage Strategies Fund (offshore), Ltd. (2014 - 2017); iCapital KKR Private Markets Fund (since 2014); and Carlyle Tactical Private Credit Fund (since March 2018)

Mark D. Gersten

Year of Birth: 1950

Chairman, Trustee

Indefinite, Since 2012

Independent Consultant (since 2012); Senior Vice President - Global Fund Administration Mutual Funds & Alternative Funds, AllianceBernstein LP (1985 - 2011) 1 Northern Lights Fund Trust (since 2013); Northern Lights Variable Trust (since 2013); iCapital KKR Private Markets Fund (since 2014); previously, Ramius Archview Credit and Distressed Fund (2015-2017); and Schroder Global Series Trust (2012 to 2017)

Neil M. Kaufman

Year of Birth: 1960

Trustee, Audit Committee Chairman

Indefinite, Since 2012

Managing Member, Kaufman, McGowan PLLC (legal services)(Since 2016); Partner, Abrams Fensterman, Fensterman, Eisman, Formato, Ferrara & 1 iCapital KKR Private Markets Fund (since 2014)
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Name, Address,

Year of Birth

Position(s) Held with Registrant

Term and Length Served

Principal Occupation(s) During Past 5 Years

Number of Portfolios Overseen In The Fund Complex**

Other Directorships Held During Past 5 Years

Wolf, LLP (legal services)(2010-2016)

Anita K. Krug

Year of Birth: 1969

Trustee

Indefinite, Since 2012

Dean and Professor (since 2019) Illinois Institute of Technology; Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs (2018-2019) University of Washington Bothell; Interim Dean (2017-2018), Professor (2016-2019), Associate Professor (2014-2016); and Assistant Professor (2010-2014), University of Washington School of Law 1 iCapital KKR Private Markets Fund (since 2014); Centerstone Investors Trust (2016-2021)

* Information is as of July 31, 2021.

** As of July 31, 2021, the Trust was comprised of 24 active portfolios managed by 7 unaffiliated investment advisers and 2 affiliated investment advisers. The term "Fund Complex" applies only to those funds that (i) are advised by a common investment adviser or by an investment adviser that is an affiliated person of the investment adviser of any of the other funds of the Trust or (ii) hold themselves out to investors as related companies for purposes of investment and investor services. The Fund does not hold itself out as related to any other series within the Trust for investment purposes.

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Officers of the Trust*

Name, Address,

Year of Birth

Position(s) Held with Registrant

Principal Occupation(s) During Past 5 Years

Number of Portfolios Overseen In The Fund Complex**

Other Directorships Held During Past 5 Years

James Colantino

Year of Birth: 1969

President

Since Feb. 2017

Treasurer

(2012 to 2017)

Senior Vice President (2012-present); Vice President (2004 to 2012); Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC.

N/A

N/A

Laura Szalyga

Year of Birth: 1978

Treasurer

Since Feb. 2017

Vice President, Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC (since 2015); Assistant Vice President, Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC (2011-2014).

N/A

N/A

Richard A. Malinowski

Year of Birth: 1983

Vice President Since September 2018

Secretary

Since 2013

Senior Vice President and Managing Counsel (since 2017); Vice President and Counsel (2016-2017) and Assistant Vice President (2012 - 2016), Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

N/A

N/A

William B. Kimme

Year of Birth: 1962

Chief Compliance Officer

Since Inception

Senior Compliance Officer, Northern Lights Compliance Services, LLC (September 2011 - present)

N/A

N/A

* Information is as of July 31, 2021.

** As of July 31, 2021, the Trust was comprised of 24 active portfolios managed by 7 unaffiliated investment advisers and 2 affiliated investment advisers. The term "Fund Complex" applies only to those funds that (i) are advised by a common investment adviser or by an investment adviser that is an affiliated person of the investment adviser of any of the other funds of the Trust or (ii) hold themselves out to investors as related companies for purposes of investment and investor services. The Fund does not hold itself out as related to any other series within the Trust for investment purposes.

Audit Committee. The Board has an Audit Committee that consists of all of the Trustees, none of whom is an "interested person" of the Trust within the meaning of the 1940 Act. The Audit Committee's responsibilities include, among other things: (i) the selection, retention or termination of the Trust's independent auditors and approval of audit and non-audit services to be provided by the independent auditors; (ii) reviewing with the independent auditors the scope, performance and anticipated cost of their audit; (iii) discussing with the independent auditors certain matters relating to the Trust's financial statements, including any adjustment to such financial statements recommended by such independent auditors, or any other results of any audit; (iv) reviewing on a periodic basis a formal written statement from the independent auditors with respect to their independence, discussing with the independent auditors any relationships or services disclosed in the statement that may impact the objectivity and independence of the Trust's independent auditors and recommending that the Board take appropriate action in response thereto to satisfy itself of the auditor's independence; and (v) considering the comments of the independent auditors and management's responses thereto with respect to the quality and adequacy of the Trust's accounting and financial reporting policies and practices and internal controls. The Audit Committee operates pursuant to an Audit Committee Charter. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Audit Committee met seven times.

Compensation of Trustees.

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Effective January 1, 2019, the Trust pays each Independent Trustee a fee of $50,000 per annum, as well as reimbursements for any reasonable expenses incurred attending the meetings, to be paid at the end of each calendar quarter. In addition, the Chairman of the Board receives an additional annual fee of $12,500 and the Chairman of the Audit Committee receives an additional annual fee of $10,000. The Trust also pays each Independent Trustee a fee of $1,000 for each Board meeting (and/or Committee meeting held in connection with such a Board meeting) other than a regularly scheduled meeting (a "Special Meeting"), except that the Audit Committee will permit up to four Special Meetings a year without any additional fees.

No "interested person" who serves as a Trustee of the Trust will receive any compensation for their services as Trustee. None of the executive officers receive compensation from the Trust.

The table below details the amount of compensation the Trustees received from the Fund Complex during the fiscal year ending July 31, 2021. The Trust does not have a bonus, profit sharing, deferred compensation, pension or retirement plan.

Name and Position

Aggregate Compensation From the Fund *

Total Compensation From Fund Complex Paid to Trustees**

Mark Garbin $2,128.26 $4,256.52
Mark Gersten $2,681.24 $5,362.48
Neil Kaufman $2,611.96 $5,223.92
Anita Krug $2,128.26 $4,256.52

* The Trust is comprised of multiple series with differing fiscal year ends. Each Fund in a Fund Complex, as defined below, may also have differing fiscal year ends. The compensation paid to the Board is determined on a calendar quarter basis.

** As of July 31, 2021, the Trust was comprised of 24 active portfolios managed by 7 unaffiliated investment advisers and 2 affiliated advisers. The term "Fund Complex" refers only to the Hanlon Managed Income Fund (which liquidated on August 27, 2021) and the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund, and not to any other series of the Trust. For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the aggregate Independent Trustees' fees paid by the entire Trust were $222,500. Trustees' fees are allocated equally to each series in the Trust.

Trustees' Ownership of Shares in The Fund. As of December 31, 2020, the Trustees beneficially owned the following amounts in the Fund and Two Roads Shared Trust:

Name of Trustee

Dollar Range of Equity Securities in the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen by Trustee in Family of Investment Companies

Mark Garbin

None $50,000-$100,000

Mark Gersten

None $10,001-$50,000

Neil Kaufman

None None

Anita Krug

None None

Management Ownership

As of November 12, 2021, the Trustees and officers, as a group, owned less than 1% of the Fund's outstanding shares and less than 1% of the Fund Complex's outstanding shares.

CONTROL PERSONS AND PRINCIPAL HOLDERS

A principal shareholder is any person who owns (of record or beneficially) 5% or more of the outstanding shares of a fund. A control person is one who owns beneficially or through controlled companies more than 25% of the voting securities of a company or acknowledges the existence of control.

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As of November 12, 2021:

i. no persons were "control" persons of the Fund. This means that there were no persons (i) owning beneficially more than 25% of the outstanding shares of the Fund, or (ii) that by acknowledgment or assertion by the controlled party or controlling party, were in control of the Fund;
ii. the Trustees and officers, as a group, owned less than one percent of the Fund's outstanding shares; and
iii. The following persons owned of record 5% or more of a class of the Fund's outstanding shares:

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Name & Address Percentage of Fund Share Class

Class A Shares

Charles Schwab & Co. Inc.

211 Main St.

San Francisco, CA 92121

65.10%

TD Ameritrade Inc.

PO Box 2226

Omaha, NE 68103

26.44%
Class C Shares

Constellation Trust Co.

FBO Jonathan Render

215 Vincent Way

Hartford, KY 42347

20.81%

National Financial Services, LLC

499 Washington Blvd.

Jersey City, NJ 07310

31.11%

National Financial Services, LLC

499 Washington Blvd.

Jersey City, NJ 07310

10.31%
Class R Shares

Nationwide Life Insurance Company

C/O IPO Portfolio Accounting

PO Box 182029

Columbus, OH 43218

9.00%

Nationwide Trust Company

C/O IPO Portfolio Accounting

PO Box 182029

Columbus, OH 43218

91.00%

INVESTMENT ADVISER

Investment Adviser and Investment Advisory Agreement

Hanlon Investment Management, Inc. ("Hanlon" or the "Adviser") serves as investment adviser to the Fund. Its principal place of business is 3393 Bargaintown Road, Egg Harbor Township, NJ 08234. Subject to the authority of the Board, the Adviser is responsible for the overall management of The Fund's business affairs. Hanlon is wholly owned by John J. ("Sean") Hanlon. As of July 31, 2021, Hanlon had assets under management of approximately $668 million.

Subject to the authority of the Board of Trustees, the Adviser is responsible for the overall management of the Fund's investment-related business affairs. Pursuant to an investment advisory agreement (the "Advisory Agreement") with the Trust, on behalf of the Fund, the Adviser, in conformity with the stated policies of the Fund, has overall supervisory responsibilities for the general management and investment of the Fund's securities portfolio, as detailed below, which are subject to review and approval by the Board of Trustees. In general, the Adviser's duties include setting The Fund's overall investment strategies and asset allocation.

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Under the Advisory Agreement, the Adviser, subject to the supervision of the Board, agrees to invest the assets of the Fund in accordance with applicable law and the investment objective, policies and restrictions set forth in the Fund's current Prospectus and Statement of Additional Information, and subject to such further limitations as the Trust may from time to time impose by written notice to the Adviser. The Adviser shall act as the investment adviser to the Fund and, as such shall: (i) obtain and evaluate such information relating to the economy, industries, business, securities markets and securities as it may deem necessary or useful in discharging its responsibilities under the Advisory Agreement,; (ii) formulate a continuing program for the investment of the assets of the Fund in a manner consistent with its investment objective, policies and restrictions; and (iii) determine from time to time securities to be purchased, sold, retained or lent by the Fund, and implement those decisions, including the selection of entities with or through which such purchases, sales or loans are to be effected; provided, that the Adviser will place orders pursuant to its investment determinations either directly with the issuer or with a broker or dealer, and if with a broker or dealer, will attempt to obtain the best price and execution of its orders, and may nevertheless in its discretion purchase and sell portfolio securities from and to brokers who provide the Adviser with research, analysis, advice and similar services and pay such brokers in return a higher commission or spread than may be charged by other brokers. The Adviser also provides necessary office facilities and personnel for servicing the Fund's investments, compensates all officers, Trustees and employees of the Trust who are officers, directors or employees of the Adviser, and all personnel of the Fund or the Adviser performing services relating to research, statistical and investment activities. The Investment Advisory Agreement was approved by the Board of the Trust, including a majority of the Independent Trustees, at a meeting held on June 28-29, 2021.

The following table sets forth the annual management fee rate payable by the Fund to the Adviser pursuant to the Investment Advisory Agreement, expressed as a percentage of the Fund's average daily net assets:

FUND ADVISORY FEE

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

1.00%

For its services to the Fund, the Adviser is entitled to receive an annual fee equal to the percentages of the Fund's average daily net assets in the table above. The advisory fee is allocated to each class shares of a fund based upon the relative proportion of the Fund's net assets represented by that class. In addition to the investment advisory fee, the Fund pays other expenses including costs incurred in connection with the maintenance of its securities law registration, printing and mailing prospectuses and Statements of Additional Information to shareholders, certain financial accounting services, taxes or governmental fees, custodial, transfer and shareholder servicing agent costs, expenses of outside counsel and independent accountants, preparation of shareholder reports and expenses of trustee and shareholders meetings. The fee is computed daily and payable monthly.

Expense Limitation Agreement

The Adviser has contractually agreed to reduce the Fund's fees and/or to absorb expenses of the Fund until at least until November 28, 2022, to ensure that total annual Fund operating expenses (exclusive of (i) any front-end or contingent deferred loads; (ii) brokerage fees and commissions; (iii) expenses of other investment companies in which the Fund may invest ("acquired fund fees and expenses"); (iv) borrowing costs, such as interest and dividend expense on securities sold short; (v) taxes; and (vi) extraordinary expenses, such as litigation expenses) do not exceed the percentages in the table below, expressed as a percentage of average daily net assets attributable to each respective share class of the Fund. This agreement may be terminated by the Board on 60 days' written notice to the Adviser. These fee waivers and expense reimbursements are subject to possible recoupment from the Fund in future years on a rolling three-year basis (within the three years of when the amount has been waived or reimbursed) if such recoupment can be achieved within the below expense limits as well as any expense limitation that was in effect at the time the waiver or reimbursement was made. Fee waiver and reimbursement arrangements can decrease the Fund's expenses and increase its performance.

Class

Expense Cap

Minimum Duration

A 1.70% November 28, 2022
C 2.45% November 28, 2022
I 1.45% November 28, 2022
R 1.85% November 28, 2022

Expenses not expressly assumed by the Adviser under the Advisory Agreement are paid by the Fund. Under the terms of the Advisory Agreement, The Fund is responsible for the payment of the following expenses among others: (a) the fees payable to the Adviser; (b)

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the fees and expenses of Trustees who are not affiliated persons of the Adviser or Distributor (as defined under the section entitled "The Distributor"); (c) the fees and certain expenses of the Custodian (as defined under the section entitled "Custodian") and Transfer and Dividend Disbursing Agent (as defined under the section entitled "Transfer Agent"), including the cost of maintaining certain required records of the Fund and of pricing the Fund's shares; (d) the charges and expenses of legal counsel and independent accountants for the Fund; (e) brokerage commissions and any issue or transfer taxes chargeable to the Fund in connection with its securities transactions, (f) all taxes and corporate fees payable by the Fund to governmental agencies; (g) the fees of any trade association of which the Fund may be a member; (h) the cost of share certificates representing shares of the Fund; (i) the cost of fidelity and liability insurance; (j) the fees and expenses involved in registering and maintaining registration of the Fund and of shares with the SEC, qualifying its shares under state securities laws, including the preparation and printing of the Fund's registration statements and prospectuses for such purposes; (k) all expenses of shareholders and Trustees' meetings (including travel expenses of trustees and officers of the Trust who are not directors, officers or employees of the Adviser) and of preparing, printing and mailing reports, proxy statements and prospectuses to shareholders in the amount necessary for distribution to the shareholders; and (l) litigation and indemnification expenses and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of the Fund's business.

With respect to the Fund, the Advisory Agreement will continue in effect for two years initially and thereafter shall continue from year to year provided such continuance is approved at least annually by (a) a vote of the majority of the Independent Trustees, cast in person at a meeting specifically called for the purpose of voting on such approval and by (b) the majority vote of either all of the Trustees or the vote of a majority of the outstanding shares of the Fund. The Advisory Agreement may be terminated without penalty on 60 days' written notice by a vote of a majority of the Trustees, the Adviser, or by holders of a majority of the Fund's outstanding shares. The Advisory Agreement shall terminate automatically in the event of its assignment.

The table below provides information about the advisory fees paid by the Fund to its investment adviser during the last three fiscal years:

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Fiscal Year Ended Management Fee Fees Earned by the Adviser Advisory Fees Waived Net Fees Earned by the Adviser Expense Reimbursed Amount Subject to Recoupment
July 31, 2019 1.00% $1,388,538 - $1,388,538 - -
July 31, 2020 1.00% $1,147,712 - $1,147,712 - -
July 31, 2021 1.00% $919,407 - $919,407 - -

Codes of Ethics

The Trust, the Adviser and the Distributor each have adopted a code of ethics under Rule 17j-1 under the 1940 Act that governs the personal securities transactions of their board members, officers and employees who may have access to current trading information of the Trust. Under the code of ethics adopted by the Trust (for the purposes of this subsection only, the "Code of Ethics"), the Trustees are permitted to invest in securities that may also be purchased by The Fund.

In addition, the Trust has adopted a separate code of ethics that applies only to the Trust's executive officers to ensure that these officers promote professional conduct in the practice of corporate governance and management. The purpose behind these guidelines is to promote (i) honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of actual or apparent conflicts of interest between personal and professional relationships; (ii) full, fair, accurate, timely, and understandable disclosure in reports and documents that a registrant files with, or submits to, the SEC and in other public communications made by The Fund; (iii) compliance with applicable governmental laws, rule and regulations; (iv) the prompt internal reporting of violations of this Code of Ethics to an appropriate person or persons identified in the Code of Ethics; and (v) accountability for adherence to the Code of Ethics.

Proxy Voting Policies

The Board has adopted Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures ("Policies") on behalf of the Trust, which delegate the responsibility for voting proxies to the Adviser, subject to the Board's continuing oversight. The Policies require that the Adviser vote proxies received in a manner consistent with the best interests of The Fund and its shareholders. The Policies also require the Adviser to present to the Board, at least annually, a copy of the Adviser's proxy voting policies and a record of each proxy voted by the Adviser on behalf of The Fund, including a report on the resolution of all proxies identified by the Adviser as involving a conflict of interest.

Where a proxy proposal raises a material conflict between the Adviser's interests and the Fund's interests, the Adviser will resolve the conflict by voting in accordance with the policy guidelines or at the client's directive using the recommendation of an independent third party. If the third party's recommendations are not received in a timely fashion, the Adviser will abstain from voting the securities held by that client's account. A copy of the Adviser's proxy voting policies is attached hereto as Appendix A.

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More information. Information regarding how The Fund voted proxies relating to portfolio securities during the most recent 12-month period ended June 30 is available (1) without charge, upon request, by calling the Fund at 1-844-828-3212 and such information will be sent within three business days of receipt of a request; and (2) on the SEC's website at http://www.sec.gov.

THE DISTRIBUTOR

Northern Lights Distributors, LLC, located at 4221 North 203rd Street, Ste. 100 Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022 (the "Distributor"), serves as the principal underwriter and distributor of the Trust pursuant to an underwriting agreement with the Trust (the "Underwriting Agreement"). The Distributor is registered as a broker-dealer under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and each state's securities laws and is a member of FINRA. The offering of The Fund's shares is continuous. The Underwriting Agreement provides that the Distributor, as agent in connection with the distribution of Fund shares, will use reasonable efforts to facilitate the sale of The Fund's shares.

The Underwriting Agreement provides that, unless sooner terminated, it will continue in effect for two years initially and thereafter shall continue from year to year, subject to annual approval by (a) the Board or a vote of a majority of the outstanding shares, and (b) by a majority of the Trustees who are not interested persons of the Trust or of the Distributor by vote cast in person at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on such approval.

The Underwriting Agreement may be terminated with respect to the Fund at any time, without the payment of any penalty, by vote of a majority of the entire Board of the Trust or by vote of a majority of the outstanding shares of the Fund on 60 days' written notice to the Distributor, or by the Distributor at any time, without the payment of any penalty, on 60 days' written notice to the Fund. The Underwriting Agreement will automatically terminate in the event of its assignment.

The following table sets forth the total compensation received by the Distributor from The Fund during the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021:

Fund Net Underwriting Discounts and Commissions Compensation on Redemptions and Repurchases Brokerage Commissions Other Compensation
Hanlon Tactical Dividend & Momentum Fund Class A $0 $0 $0 *
Hanlon Tactical Dividend & Momentum Fund Class C $0 $0 $0 *
Hanlon Tactical Dividend & Momentum Fund Class R $0 $0 $0 *
* The Distributor received $49,881 from the Adviser as compensation for its distribution services to The Fund.

Rule 12b-1 Plans

The Trust has adopted Distribution Plans pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act (the "Plans") pursuant to which The Fund is authorized to pay the Distributor, as compensation for the Distributor's account maintenance services under the Plans, a distribution and shareholder servicing fee at the rate of up to 0.25% for Class A shares, up to 1.00% for Class C shares and up to 0.50% for Class R shares (currently, 0.40%), of The Fund's average daily net assets attributable to the relevant class. Such fees are to be paid by The Fund monthly, or at such other intervals as the Board shall determine. Such fees shall be based upon The Fund's average daily net assets during the preceding month and shall be calculated and accrued daily. The Fund may pay fees to the Distributor at a lesser rate, as agreed upon by the Board of the Trust and the Distributor. The Plans authorize payments to the Distributor as compensation for providing account maintenance services to Fund shareholders, including arranging for certain securities dealers or brokers, administrators and others ("Recipients") to provide these services and paying compensation for these services. The Fund will bear its own costs of distribution with respect to its shares. The Recipients or other entities also receive the proceeds and contingent deferred sales charges imposed on certain redemptions of shares, which are separate and apart from payments made pursuant to the Plans.

The services to be provided by Recipients may include, but are not limited to, the following: assistance in the offering and sale of Fund shares and in other aspects of the marketing of the shares to clients or prospective clients of the respective recipients; answering routine inquiries concerning The Fund; assisting in the establishment and maintenance of accounts or sub-accounts in The Fund and in processing purchase and redemption transactions; making The Fund's investment plan and shareholder services available; and providing such other information and services to investors in shares of the Fund as the Distributor or the Trust, on behalf of The Fund, may reasonably request. The distribution services shall also include any advertising and marketing services provided by or arranged by the Distributor with respect to The Fund.

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The Distributor is required to provide a written report, at least quarterly to the Board, specifying in reasonable detail the amounts expended pursuant to the Plans and the purposes for which such expenditures were made. Further, the Distributor will inform the Board of any Rule 12b-1 fees to be paid by the Distributor to Recipients.

The initial term of each Plan is one year and will continue in effect from year to year thereafter, provided such continuance is specifically approved at least annually by a majority of the Board and a majority of the Trustees who are not "interested persons" of the Trust and do not have a direct or indirect financial interest in the Plan ("Rule 12b-1 Trustees") by votes cast in person at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on a Plan. A Plan may be terminated at any time by the Trust or The Fund by vote of a majority of the Rule 12b-1 Trustees or by vote of a majority of the outstanding voting shares of The Fund.

A Plan may not be amended to increase materially the amount of the Distributor's compensation to be paid by The Fund, unless such amendment is approved by the vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the affected class of the Fund (as defined in the 1940 Act). All material amendments must be approved by a majority of the Board and a majority of the Rule 12b- 1 Trustees by votes cast in person at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on a Plan. During the term of a Plan, the selection and nomination of non-interested Trustees of the Trust will be committed to the discretion of current non-interested Trustees. The Distributor will preserve copies of each Plan, any related agreements, and all reports, for a period of not less than six years from the date of such document and for at least the first two years in an easily accessible place.

Any agreement related to a Plan will be in writing and provide that: (a) it may be terminated by the Trust or The Fund at any time upon sixty days' written notice, without the payment of any penalty, by vote of a majority of the respective Rule 12b-1 Trustees, or by vote of a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Trust or The Fund; (b) it will automatically terminate in the event of its assignment (as defined in the 1940 Act); and (c) it will continue in effect for a period of more than one year from the date of its execution or adoption only so long as such continuance is specifically approved at least annually by a majority of the Board and a majority of the Rule 12b-1 Trustees by votes cast in person at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on such agreement. No "interested person" (as defined in the 1940 Act) of the Fund nor any Trustee had a direct or indirect financial interest in the operation of the Plans or related agreements.

During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund Class A, Class C, and Class R shares incurred $19,752, $10,623 and $70,150, respectively, in distribution related fees pursuant to the Plans. For the fiscal year indicated below, The Fund incurred the following allocated distribution expenses:

Actual 12b-1 Expenditures Paid
During the Fiscal Period Ended July 31, 2021
Tactical Dividend & Momentum Fund Class A Tactical Dividend & Momentum Fund Class C Tactical Dividend & Momentum Fund Class R
Advertising/Marketing None None None
Printing/Postage None None None
Payment to distributor $0 $0 $0
Payment to dealers $6,450 $10,157 $70,092
Compensation to sales personnel None None None
Other $13,302 $466 $58
Total $19,752 $10,623 $70,150

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

The table below includes details about the type, number, and assets under management for the various types of accounts, and total assets in the accounts with respect to which the advisory fee is based on the performance of the accounts. The information is as of July 31, 2021:

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John J. ("Sean") Hanlon, IV

Account Type

Number of Accounts by Account Type

Total Assets By Account Type

Number of Accounts by Type Subject to a Performance Fee

Total assets By Account Type Subject to a Performance Fee

Registered Investment Companies

2 $163 Million 0 $0

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

0 $0 0 $0

Other Accounts

3,314 $505 Million 0 $0

George Peller

Account Type

Number of Accounts by Account Type

Total Assets By Account Type

Number of Accounts by Type Subject to a Performance Fee

Total assets By Account Type Subject to a Performance Fee

Registered Investment Companies

2 $163 Million 0 $0

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

0 $0 0 $0

Other Accounts

3,314 $505 Million 0 $0

Conflicts of Interest

In addition to advising The Fund, the Adviser provides discretionary investment management services to individuals, investment companies, pension and profit sharing plans, trusts, estates, charitable organizations, corporations and business entities ("clients"). The Adviser's clients may participate in investment programs that have investment objectives, policies and strategies that are substantially similar to the Fund. Other clients of the Adviser may have differing investment programs, objectives, policies and strategies. In general, when a portfolio manager has responsibility for managing more than one account, potential conflicts of interest may arise. Those conflicts could include preferential treatment of one account over others in terms of allocation of resources or of investment opportunities. For instance, the Adviser may receive fees from certain accounts that are higher than the fee it receives from the Fund, or the Adviser could receive performance-based fees on certain accounts. The procedures to address conflicts of interest, if any, are described below.

The Adviser attempts to avoid conflicts of interest that may arise as a result of the management of multiple client accounts. From time to time, a portfolio manager may recommend or cause a client to invest in a security or other instrument in which another client of the Adviser has an ownership position. Transactions for each client generally will be effected independently, unless the Adviser decides to purchase or sell the same securities for several clients at approximately the same time. The Adviser may (but is not obligated to) combine or "batch" such orders to obtain best execution, to negotiate more favorable commission rates, or to allocate equitably among the Adviser's clients differences in prices and commissions or other transaction costs that might have been obtained had such orders been placed independently. Under this procedure, transactions will generally be averaged as to price and allocated among the Adviser's clients pro rata to the purchase and sale orders placed for each client on any given day. To the extent that the Adviser determines to aggregate client orders for the purchase or sale of securities, the Adviser does so in accordance with applicable law.

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Compensation

Portfolio manager compensation is based on individual performance, the responsibilities of the employee and communication skills and analytical factors. In addition, as owner of the Adviser, Mr. Hanlon receives additional compensation in the form of net profits, if any, that the Adviser earns.

Ownership of Securities

The following table shows the dollar range of equity securities beneficially owned by the portfolio managers in The Fund as of July 31, 2021.

Name of Portfolio Manager

Dollar Range of Equity Securities in the Hanlon Managed Income Fund

Dollar Range of Equity Securities in the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

Sean Hanlon $10,001-$50,000 Over $1,000,000
George Peller None None

* Mr. Peller became a portfolio manager of The Fund on November 1, 2018

ALLOCATION OF PORTFOLIO BROKERAGE

Specific decisions to purchase or sell securities for The Fund are made by the portfolio manager, who is an employee of the Adviser. The Adviser is authorized by the Trustees to allocate the orders placed by it on behalf of The Fund to brokers or dealers who may, but need not, provide research or statistical material or other services to the Fund or the Adviser for the Fund's use. Such allocation is to be in such amounts and proportions as the Adviser may determine.

In selecting a broker or dealer to execute each particular transaction, the Adviser will take the following into consideration:

the best net price available;
the reliability, integrity and financial condition of the broker or dealer;
the size of and difficulty in executing the order; and
the value of the expected contribution of the broker or dealer to the investment performance of the Fund on a continuing basis.

Brokers or dealers executing a portfolio transaction on behalf of the Fund may receive a commission in excess of the amount of commission another broker or dealer would have charged for executing the transaction if the Adviser determines in good faith that such commission is reasonable in relation to the value of brokerage, research and other services provided to the Fund. In allocating portfolio brokerage, the Adviser may select brokers or dealers who also provide brokerage, research and other services to other accounts over which the Adviser exercises investment discretion. Some of the services received as the result of Fund transactions may primarily benefit accounts other than those of the Fund, while services received as the result of portfolio transactions effected on behalf of those other accounts may primarily benefit the Fund.

For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2019, the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund paid $265 in brokerage commissions. For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2020, the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund paid $512 in brokerage commissions. For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund paid $0 in brokerage commissions. The Fund did not pay brokerage commissions for the fiscal year 2021 as the Fund only invested in commission-free ETFs.

PORTFOLIO TURNOVER

The Fund's portfolio turnover rate is calculated by dividing the lesser of purchases or sales of portfolio securities for the fiscal year by the monthly average of the value of the portfolio securities owned by the Fund during the fiscal year. The calculation excludes from both the numerator and the denominator securities with maturities at the time of acquisition of one year or less. High portfolio turnover involves correspondingly greater brokerage commissions and other transaction costs, which will be borne directly by that Fund. A 100% turnover rate would occur if all of the Fund's portfolio securities were replaced once within a one-year period. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2020, the portfolio turnover for the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund was 293%. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021, the portfolio turnover for the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund was 64%. The Fund is tactical, and trades are driven primarily by tactical trading signals. Some market environments will be less volatile and necessitate less frequent trading. The Fiscal year 2021 was an example of a less volatile market therefore the Fund had fewer trades.

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OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS

Fund Administration, Fund Accounting and Transfer Agent Services

Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC ("UFS"), which has its principal office at 225 Pictoria Drive, Suite 450 Cincinnati, Ohio, 45246, serves as administrator, fund accountant and transfer agent for The Fund pursuant to the Fund Services Agreement (the "Agreement") with The Fund and subject to the supervision of the Board. UFS is primarily in the business of providing administrative, fund accounting and transfer agent services to retail and institutional mutual funds. UFS is an affiliate of the Distributor. UFS may also provide persons to serve as officers of The Fund. Such officers may be directors, officers or employees of UFS or its affiliates.

The Agreement became effective on September 28, 2021 and remained in effect for two years from the applicable effective date for The Fund and will continue in effect for successive twelve-month periods provided that such continuance is specifically approved at least annually by a majority of the Board. The Agreement is terminable by the Board or UFS on 90 days' written notice and may be assigned by either party, provided that the Trust may not assign this agreement without the prior written consent of UFS. The Agreement provides that UFS shall be without liability for any action reasonably taken or omitted pursuant to the Agreement.

Under the Agreement, UFS performs administrative services for the Fund, including: (1) monitor the performance of administrative and professional services rendered to the Trust by others service providers; (2) monitor Fund holdings and operations for post-trade compliance with the Fund's registration statement and applicable laws and rules; (3) prepare and coordinate the printing of semi-annual and annual financial statements; (4) prepare selected management reports for performance and compliance analyses; (5) prepare and disseminate materials for and attend and participate in meetings of the Board; (6) determine income and capital gains available for distribution and calculate distributions required to meet regulatory, income, and excise tax requirements; (7) review the Trust's federal, state, and local tax returns as prepared and signed by the Trust's independent public accountants; (8) prepare and maintain the Trust's operating expense budget to determine proper expense accruals to be charged to the Fund to calculate its daily net asset value; (9) assist in and monitor the preparation, filing, printing and where applicable, dissemination to shareholders of amendments to the Trust's Registration Statement on Form N-1A, periodic reports to the Trustees, shareholders and the SEC, notices pursuant to Rule 24f-2, proxy materials and reports to the SEC on Forms N-CEN, N-CSR, N-PORT and N-PX; (10) coordinate the Trust's audits and examinations by assisting the Fund's independent public accountants; (11) determine, in consultation with others, the jurisdictions in which shares of the Trust shall be registered or qualified for sale and facilitate such registration or qualification; (12) monitor sales of shares and ensure that the shares are properly and duly registered with the SEC; (13) monitor the calculation of performance data for the Fund; (14) prepare, or cause to be prepared, expense and financial reports; (15) prepare authorization for the payment of Trust expenses and pay, from Trust assets, all bills of the Trust; (16) provide information typically supplied in the investment company industry to companies that track or report price, performance or other information with respect to investment companies; (17) upon request, assist the Fund in the evaluation and selection of other service providers, such as independent public accountants, printers, EDGAR providers and proxy solicitors (such parties may be affiliates of UFS); (18) perform other services, recordkeeping and assistance relating to the affairs of the Trust as the Trust may, from time to time, reasonably request.

UFS also provides The Fund with accounting services, including: (i) daily computation of net asset value; (ii) maintenance of security ledgers and books and records as required by the 1940 Act; (iii) production of the Fund's listing of portfolio securities and general ledger reports; (iv) reconciliation of accounting records; (v) calculation of yield and total return for the Fund; (vi) maintaining certain books and records described in Rule 31a-1 under the 1940 Act, and reconciling account information and balances among the Fund's custodian and Adviser; and (vii) monitoring and evaluating daily income and expense accruals, and sales and redemptions of shares of the Fund.

UFS also acts as transfer, dividend disbursing, and shareholder servicing agent for The Fund pursuant to the Agreement. Under the agreement, UFS is responsible for administering and performing transfer agent functions, dividend distribution, shareholder administration, and maintaining necessary records in accordance with applicable rules and regulations.

For the services rendered to the Fund by the Administrator, the Fund pays the Administrator the greater of an annual minimum fee or an asset-based fee, which scales downward based upon net assets for fund administration, fund accounting and transfer agency services.

For the services rendered to The Fund by UFS, the Fund pays UFS the greater of an annual minimum fee or an asset-based fee, which scales downward based upon net assets for fund administration, fund accounting, and transfer agency services. For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2019 the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund paid $112,778 for fund administrative service fees, $53,015 for fund accounting services, and $52,339 for transfer agency services. For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2020 the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund paid $95,817 for fund administrative service fees, $48,481 for fund accounting services, and $47,499 for transfer agency services. For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021 the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund paid $87,945 for fund administrative service fees, $47,595 for fund accounting services, and $36,609 for transfer agency services.

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Custodian

The Bank of New York Mellon (the "Custodian") serves as the custodian of The Fund's assets pursuant to a Custody Agreement by and between the Custodian and the Trust on behalf of The Fund. The Custodian's responsibilities include safeguarding and controlling The Fund's cash and securities, handling the receipt and delivery of securities, and collecting interest and dividends on The Fund's investments. Pursuant to the Custody Agreement, the Custodian also maintains original entry documents and books of record and general ledgers; posts cash receipts and disbursements; and records purchases and sales based upon communications from the Adviser. The Fund may employ foreign sub-custodians that are approved by the Board to hold foreign assets. The Custodian's principal place of business is One Wall Street, New York, New York 10286.

Securities Lending Activities

The Custodian also serves as The Fund's securities lending agent pursuant to a Securities Lending Authorization Agreement between the Custodian and the Trust on behalf of The Fund. The dollar amounts of income and fees and compensation paid to The Fund and Custodian related to The Fund's respective securities lending activities during fiscal year ended July 31, 2021 were as follows:

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund
Gross income from securities lending activities
(including income from cash collateral reinvestment)

$37,307

Fees and/or compensation for securities lending activities and related services $0
Fees paid to securities lending agent from a revenue split $(12,692)
Fees paid for any cash collateral management service (including fees deducted from a pooled cash collateral reinvestment vehicle) that are not included in the revenue split* $0
Administrative fees not included in revenue split $0
Indemnification fees not included in revenue split $0
Rebate (paid to borrower) $9,118
Other fees not included in revenue split $0
Aggregate fees/compensation for securities lending activities $(3,574)
Net income from securities lending activities

$33,733

* The Fund's cash collateral was invested in the Dreyfus Government Cash Management and Milestone Treasury Obligations Fund during the fiscal year ended July 31, 2021.

The services provided by the custodian as securities lending agent are as follows: selection of securities to be loaned; locating borrowers previously approved by The Fund's board; negotiation of loan terms; monitoring daily the value of the loaned securities and collateral; requiring additional collateral as necessary; investing cash collateral in accordance with The Fund's instructions; marking to market non-cash collateral; maintaining custody of non-cash collateral; recordkeeping and account servicing; monitoring dividend activity and material proxy votes relating to loaned securities; transferring loaned securities; recalling loaned securities in accordance with The Fund's instructions; and arranging for return of loaned securities to the Fund at loan termination.

Chief Compliance Officer

Northern Lights Compliance Services, LLC ("NLCS"), , an affiliate of UFS and the Distributor, provides a Chief Compliance Officer to the Trust as well as related compliance services pursuant to a consulting agreement between NLCS and the Trust. NLCS's compliance services consist primarily of reviewing and assessing the policies and procedures of the Trust and its service providers pertaining to compliance with applicable federal securities laws, including Rule 38a-1 under the 1940 Act. For the compliance services rendered to The Fund, The Fund paid NLCS a one-time fee plus an annual asset based fee, which scales downward based on net assets. The Fund also pay NLCS for any out-of-pocket expenses.

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DESCRIPTION OF SHARES

Each share of beneficial interest of the Trust has one vote in the election of Trustees. Cumulative voting is not authorized for the Trust. This means that the holders of more than 50% of the shares voting for the election of Trustees can elect 100% of the Trustees if they choose to do so, and, in that event, the holders of the remaining shares will be unable to elect any Trustees.

Shareholders of the Trust and any other future series of the Trust will vote in the aggregate and not by series except as otherwise required by law or when the Board determines that the matter to be voted upon affects only the interest of the shareholders of a particular series or classes. Matters such as election of Trustees are not subject to separate voting requirements and may be acted upon by shareholders of the Trust voting without regard to series.

The Trust is authorized to issue an unlimited number of shares of beneficial interest. Each share has equal, per-class dividend, distribution and liquidation rights. There are no conversion or preemptive rights applicable to any shares of The Fund. All shares issued are fully paid and non-assessable.

The Trust's by-laws state that unless the Trust consents in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the sole and exclusive forums for any Shareholder (including a beneficial owner) to bring (i) any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of the Trust; (ii) any action asserting a claim or breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any Trustee, officer or employee, if any, of the Trust to the Trust or the Trust's Shareholders or its beneficial owners; (iii) any action asserting a claim against the Trust, its Trustees, officers or employees, if any, arising pursuant to any provision of the Delaware Statutory Trust Act or the Trust's Agreement and Declaration of Trust or by-laws; or (iv) any action asserting a claim against the Trust, its Trustees, officers or employees, if any, governed by the internal affairs doctrine shall be a state or federal court located within the State of Delaware. The Trust's by-laws also state that any person or entity that is a shareholder of the Trust shall be deemed to have notice of and consented to the foregoing provisions of the Trust's by-laws.

ANTI-MONEY LAUNDERING PROGRAM

The Trust has established an Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Program (the "Program") as required by the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 ("USA PATRIOT Act"). To ensure compliance with this law, the Trust's Program provides for the development of internal practices, procedures and controls, designation of anti-money laundering compliance officers, an ongoing training program and an independent audit function to determine the effectiveness of the Program. The Trust's Secretary serves as its Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Officer.

Procedures to implement the Program include, but are not limited to, determining that The Fund's Distributor and Transfer Agent have established proper anti-money laundering procedures, reported suspicious and/or fraudulent activity and a complete and thorough review of all new opening account applications. The Trust will not transact business with any person or entity whose identity cannot be adequately verified under the provisions of the USA PATRIOT Act.

As a result of the Program, the Trust may be required to "freeze" the account of a shareholder if the shareholder appears to be involved in suspicious activity or if certain account information matches information on government lists of known terrorists or other suspicious persons, or the Trust may be required to transfer the account or proceeds of the account to a governmental agency.

PURCHASE, REDEMPTION AND PRICING OF SHARES

Calculation of Share Price

As indicated in the Prospectus under the heading "How Shares Are Priced," the NAV of The Fund's shares is determined by dividing the total value of the Fund's portfolio investments and other assets, less any liabilities, by the total number of shares outstanding of the Fund.

Generally, The Fund's domestic securities (including underlying ETFs which hold portfolio securities primarily listed on foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges) are valued each day at the last quoted sales price on each security's primary exchange. Securities traded or dealt in upon one or more securities exchanges for which market quotations are readily available and not subject to restrictions against resale shall be valued at the last quoted sales price on the primary exchange or, in the absence of a sale on the primary exchange, at the mean between the current bid and ask prices on such exchange. Securities primarily traded in the National Association of Securities Dealers' Automated Quotation System ("NASDAQ") National Market System for which market quotations are readily available shall be valued using the NASDAQ Official Closing Price. If market quotations are not readily available, securities will be valued at their fair market value as determined in good faith by the Fund's fair value committee in accordance with procedures approved by the Board and as further described below. Securities that are not traded or dealt in any securities exchange (whether domestic or foreign) and for which over-the-counter market quotations are readily available generally shall be valued at the last sale price or, in the absence of a sale, at the mean between the current bid and ask price on such over-the- counter market.

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Certain securities or investments for which daily market quotes are not readily available may be valued, pursuant to guidelines established by the Board, with reference to other securities or indices. Debt securities not traded on an exchange may be valued at prices supplied by a pricing agent(s) based on broker or dealer supplied valuations or matrix pricing, a method of valuing securities by reference to the value of other securities with similar characteristics, such as rating, interest rate and maturity. Short-term investments having a maturity of 60 days or less may be generally valued at amortized cost, provided such valuations represent par value.

Exchange traded options are valued at the last quoted sales price or, in the absence of a sale, at the mean between the current bid and ask prices on the exchange on which such options are traded. Futures and options on futures are valued at the settlement price determined by the exchange. Other securities for which market quotes are not readily available are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board or persons acting at their direction. Swap agreements and other derivatives are generally valued daily based upon quotations from market makers or by a pricing service in accordance with the valuation procedures approved by the Board. Other securities for which market quotes are not readily available are valued at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board or persons acting at their direction.

Under certain circumstances, the Fund may use an independent pricing service to calculate the fair market value of foreign equity securities on a daily basis by applying valuation factors to the last sale price or the mean price as noted above. The fair market values supplied by the independent pricing service will generally reflect market trading that occurs after the close of the applicable foreign markets of comparable securities or the value of other instruments that have a strong correlation to the fair-valued securities. The independent pricing service will also take into account the current relevant currency exchange rate. A security that is fair valued may be valued at a price higher or lower than actual market quotations or the value determined by other funds using their own fair valuation procedures. Because foreign securities may trade on days when Fund shares are not priced, the value of securities held by the Fund can change on days when Fund shares cannot be redeemed or purchased. In the event that a foreign security's market quotations are not readily available or are deemed unreliable (for reasons other than because the foreign exchange on which it trades closed before the Fund's calculation of NAV), the security will be valued at its fair market value as determined in good faith by the Fund's fair value committee in accordance with procedures approved by the Board as discussed below. Without fair valuation, it is possible that short-term traders could take advantage of the arbitrage opportunity and dilute the NAV of long-term investors. Fair valuation of the Fund's portfolio securities can serve to reduce arbitrage opportunities available to short-term traders, but there is no assurance that it will prevent dilution of the Fund's NAV by short-term traders. In addition, because the Fund may invest in underlying ETFs which hold portfolio securities primarily listed on foreign (non-U.S.) exchanges, and these exchanges may trade on weekends or other days when the underlying ETFs do not price their shares, the value of these portfolio securities may change on days when you may not be able to buy or sell Fund shares.

Investments initially valued in currencies other than the U.S. dollar are converted to U.S. dollars using exchange rates obtained from pricing services. As a result, the NAV of the Fund's shares may be affected by changes in the value of currencies in relation to the U.S. dollar. The value of securities traded in markets outside the United States or denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar may be affected significantly on a day that the New York Stock Exchange is closed and an investor is not able to purchase, redeem or exchange shares.

Fund shares are valued at the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (normally 4:00 p.m., Eastern Time) (the "NYSE Close") on each day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. For purposes of calculating the NAV, The Fund normally uses pricing data for domestic equity securities received shortly after the NYSE Close and does not normally take into account trading, clearances or settlements that take place after the NYSE Close. Domestic fixed income and foreign (non-U.S.) securities are normally priced using data reflecting the earlier closing of the principal markets for those securities. Information that becomes known to The Fund or their agents after the NAV has been calculated on a particular day will not generally be used to retroactively adjust the price of the security or the NAV determined earlier that day.

In unusual circumstances, instead of valuing securities in the usual manner, The Fund may value securities at fair value or estimate their value as determined in good faith by the Board or their designees, pursuant to procedures approved by the Board. Fair valuation may also be used by the Board if extraordinary events occur after the close of the relevant market but prior to the NYSE Close.

The Trust expects that the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") will be closed on the following days: weekends and New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

Fair Value Committee and Valuation Process. The Fair Value Committee is composed of one of more officers from each of the (i) Trust, (ii) administrator, and (iii) the Adviser. The applicable investments are valued collectively via inputs from each of these groups. For example, fair value determinations are required for the following securities: (i) securities for which market quotations are insufficient or not readily available on a particular business day (including securities for which there is a short and temporary lapse in the provision of a price by the regular pricing source), (ii) securities for which, in the judgment of the Adviser, the prices or values available do not represent the fair value of the instrument. Factors which may cause the Adviser to make such a judgment include, but are not limited to,

42

the following: only a bid price or an asked price is available; the spread between bid and asked prices is substantial; the frequency of sales; the thinness of the market; the size of reported trades; and actions of the securities markets, such as the suspension or limitation of trading; (iii) securities determined to be illiquid; (iv) securities with respect to which an event that will affect the value thereof has occurred (a "significant event") since the closing prices were established on the principal exchange on which they are traded, but prior to the Fund's calculation of its net asset value. Specifically, interests in commodity pools or managed futures pools are valued on a daily basis by reference to the closing market prices of each futures contract or other asset held by a pool, as adjusted for pool expenses. Restricted or illiquid securities, such as private placements or non-traded securities, are valued via inputs from the Adviser based upon the current bid for the security from two or more independent dealers or other parties reasonably familiar with the facts and circumstances of the security (who should take into consideration all relevant factors as may be appropriate under the circumstances). If the Adviser is unable to obtain a current bid from such independent dealers or other independent parties, the fair value team shall determine the fair value of such security using the following factors: (i) the type of security; (ii) the cost at date of purchase; (iii) the size and nature of the Fund's holdings; (iv) the discount from market value of unrestricted securities of the same class at the time of purchase and subsequent thereto; (v) information as to any transactions or offers with respect to the security; (vi) the nature and duration of restrictions on disposition of the security and the existence of any registration rights; (vii) how the yield of the security compares to similar securities of companies of similar or equal creditworthiness; (viii) the level of recent trades of similar or comparable securities; (ix) the liquidity characteristics of the security; (x) current market conditions; and (xi) the market value of any securities into which the security is convertible or exchangeable.

Standards For Fair Value Determinations. As a general principle, the fair value of a security is the amount that the Fund might reasonably expect to realize upon its current sale. The Trust applies Financial Accounting Standards Board Statement of Financial Accounting Standards Codification Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures ("ASC 820"). In accordance with ASC 820, fair value is defined as the price that the Fund would receive upon selling an investment in a timely transaction to an independent buyer in the principal or most advantageous market of the investment. ASC 820 establishes a three-tier hierarchy to maximize the use of observable market data and minimize the use of unobservable inputs and to establish classification of fair value measurements for disclosure purposes. Inputs refer broadly to the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk, for example, the risk inherent in a particular valuation technique used to measure fair value including such a pricing model and/or the risk inherent in the inputs to the valuation technique. Inputs may be observable or unobservable. Observable inputs are inputs that reflect the assumptions market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability developed based on market data obtained from sources independent of the reporting entity. Unobservable inputs are inputs that reflect the reporting entity's own assumptions about the assumptions market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, developed based on the best information available under the circumstances.

Various inputs are used in determining the value of The Fund's investments relating to ASC 820. These inputs are summarized in the three broad levels listed below.

Level 1 - quoted prices in active markets for identical securities.

Level 2 - other significant observable inputs (including quoted prices for similar securities, interest rates, prepayment speeds, credit risk, etc.)

Level 3 - significant unobservable inputs (including the Fund's own assumptions in determining the fair value of investments).

The Fair Value Committee takes into account the relevant factors and surrounding circumstances, which may include: (i) the nature and pricing history (if any) of the security; (ii) whether any dealer quotations for the security are available; (iii) possible valuation methodologies that could be used to determine the fair value of the security; (iv) the recommendation of a portfolio manager of the Fund with respect to the valuation of the security; (v) whether the same or similar securities are held by other funds managed by the Adviser (or sub-adviser) or other funds and the method used to price the security in those funds; (vi) the extent to which the fair value to be determined for the security will result from the use of data or formulae produced by independent third parties and (vii) the liquidity or illiquidity of the market for the security.

Valuation Committee and Board of Trustees Determination. The Valuation Committee of the Board generally meets on a quarterly basis to consider the valuations provided by the Fair Value Committee and to ratify the valuations made for the applicable securities. The Board reviews and considers the determinations reached by the Fair Value Committee in ratifying the Fair Value Committee's application of the fair valuation methodologies employed.

The Trust expects that the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") will be closed on the following holidays: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day.

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Purchase of Shares

Orders for shares received by The Fund in good order prior to the close of business on the NYSE on each day during such periods that the NYSE is open for trading are priced at net asset value per share computed as of the close of the regular session of trading on the NYSE. Orders received in good order after the close of the NYSE, or on a day it is not open for trading, are priced at the close of such NYSE on the next day on which it is open for trading at the next determined net asset value per share.

Notice to Texas Shareholders

Under section 72.1021(a) of the Texas Property Code, initial investors in the Fund who are Texas residents may designate a representative to receive notices of abandoned property in connection with Fund shares. Texas shareholders who wish to appoint a representative should notify the Trust's Transfer Agent by writing to the address below to obtain a form for providing written notice to the Trust:

Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund

c/o Ultimus Fund Solutions, LLC

4221 North 203rd Street, Suite 100

Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022

Redemption of Shares

Shares of The Fund may be redeemed on any business day upon receipt of a request for redemption, in accordance with the procedures set forth in The Fund's Prospectus. Redemptions are effected at the per share NAV, next determined after receipt of the redemption request. Redemption proceeds will ordinarily be paid within seven days following receipt of instructions in proper form, or sooner, if required by law. The right of redemption may be suspended by the Trust or the payment date postponed beyond seven days when

(a) the NYSE is closed, other than customary weekend and holiday closings;

(b) trading on that exchange is restricted for any reason;

(c) an emergency exists as a result of which disposal by the Fund of securities owned by it is not reasonably practicable or it is not reasonably practicable for the Fund to fairly determine the value of its net assets, provided that applicable rules and regulations of the SEC (or any succeeding governmental authority) will govern as to whether the conditions prescribed in (b) or (c) exist; or

(d) the SEC by order permits a suspension of the right to redemption or a postponement of the date of payment on redemption.

In case of suspension of the right of redemption, payment of a redemption request will be made based on the net asset value next determined after the termination of the suspension.

If the Board should determine that it would be detrimental to the best interests of the remaining shareholders of the Fund to make payment wholly or partly in cash, the Fund may pay the redemption price in whole or part by a distribution in kind of securities from the Fund, in lieu of cash, in conformity with applicable rules of the SEC. If shares are redeemed in kind, the redeeming shareholder might incur brokerage costs in converting the assets into cash. Under the 1940 Act, the Trust is obligated to redeem shares solely in cash up to the lesser of $250,000 or 1% of its net assets during any 90-day period for any one shareholder.

Supporting documents in addition to those listed under "How to Redeem Shares" in The Fund's Prospectus will be required from executors, administrators, Trustees, or if redemption is requested by someone other than the shareholder of record. Such documents include, but are not restricted to, stock powers, Trust instruments, certificates of death, appointments as executor, certificates of corporate authority and waiver of tax required in some states when settling estates.

TAX STATUS

The following discussion is general in nature and should not be regarded as an exhaustive presentation of all possible tax ramifications. All shareholders should consult a qualified tax adviser regarding their investment in the Fund.

The Fund intends to qualify and has elected to be treated as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code, and intends to continue to so qualify, which requires compliance with certain requirements concerning the sources of its income, diversification of its assets, and the amount and timing of its distributions to shareholders, as described more fully below. Such qualification does not involve supervision of management or investment practices or policies by any government agency or bureau. By so qualifying, The Fund should not be subject to U.S. federal income or excise tax on its investment company taxable income or net capital gain, which are distributed to shareholders in accordance with the applicable timing requirements. Investment company taxable income and net capital gain of The Fund will be computed in accordance with Section 852 of the Code.

Investment company taxable income is made up of dividends and interest less expenses, plus any excess of net short-term capital gains over net long-term capital losses. Net capital gain (that is, the excess of net long-term capital gains over net-short-term capital losses) for a fiscal year is computed by taking into account any capital loss carry forward of the Fund. Capital losses may be carried forward

44

indefinitely and retain the character of the original loss. Capital loss carry forwards are available to offset future realized capital gains. To the extent that these carry forwards are used to offset future capital gains it is probable that the amount offset will not be distributed to shareholders.

To be treated as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M of the Code, The Fund must, among other requirements, (a) derive at least 90% of its gross income from dividends, interest, payments with respect to certain securities loans, gains from the sale or other disposition of stocks, securities or foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, or other income (including gains from options, futures or forward contracts) derived with respect to the business of investing in such securities or currencies, and net income from "publicly traded partnerships" (as defined in Section 851(h) of the Code), and (b) diversify its holdings so that, at the end of each quarter, (i) at least 50% of the value of the Fund's total assets is represented by cash and cash items, U.S. government securities and securities of other regulated investment companies, and other securities (for purposes of this calculation, generally limited in respect of any one issuer, to an amount not greater than 5% of the value of the Fund's total assets and 10% of the outstanding voting securities of such issuer) and (ii) not more than 25% of the value of the Fund's total assets is invested in the securities (other than U.S. government securities or the securities of other regulated investment companies) of any one issuer, or two or more issuers which the Fund controls and which are determined to be engaged in the same or similar trades or businesses, or the securities of certain publicly traded partnerships.

If the Fund qualifies as a regulated investment company and distributes to its shareholders each taxable year an amount equal to or exceeding the sum of (i) 90% of its investment company taxable income without regard to the deduction for dividends paid and (ii) 90% of the excess of its gross tax-exempt interest, if any, over certain disallowed deductions, the Fund generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on any income of the Fund, including net capital gain, distributed to shareholders. If, however, the Fund meets such distribution requirements, but chooses to retain a portion of its investment company taxable income or net capital gain, it generally will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at regular corporate rates on the amount retained.

The Fund intends to distribute all of its investment company taxable income and any net capital gains in accordance with the timing requirements imposed by the Code and therefore should not be required to pay any U.S. federal income or excise taxes. Distributions of investment company taxable income and net capital gain will be made after the end of each fiscal year ending October 31, and no later than December 31 of each year. Both types of distributions will be in shares of the Fund unless a shareholder elects to receive cash.

If the Fund fails to qualify as a regulated investment company under Subchapter M in any fiscal year, it will be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As such, that Fund would be required to pay U.S. federal income taxes on its investment company taxable income and net capital gains, if any, at the rates generally applicable to corporations (currently, at a maximum rate of 21%). Shareholders of such the Fund generally would not be liable for U.S. federal income tax on the Fund's investment company taxable income or net capital gains in their individual capacities. Distributions to shareholders, whether from that Fund's investment company taxable income or net capital gains, would be treated as taxable dividends to the extent of current or accumulated earnings and profits of that Fund.

The Fund is subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax on certain undistributed amounts of ordinary income and capital gain under a prescribed formula contained in Section 4982 of the Code. The formula requires payment to shareholders during a calendar year of distributions representing at least 98% of the Fund's ordinary income for the calendar year and at least 98.2% of its capital gain net income (i.e., the excess of its capital gains over capital losses) realized during the one-year period ending October 31 during such year plus 100% of any income that was neither distributed nor taxed to The Fund during the preceding calendar year. Under ordinary circumstances, The Fund expects to time its distributions so as to avoid liability for this tax.

Dividends or distributions declared in October, November or December as of a record date in such a month, if any, will be deemed to have been received by shareholders on December 31, if paid during January of the following year. Redemptions of shares may result in tax consequences (gain or loss) to the shareholder and are also subject to these reporting requirements. In addition, certain other distributions made after the close of a taxable year of The Fund may be "spilled back" and treated as paid by the Fund (except for the purposes of the 4% excise tax) during such taxable year. In such case, shareholders generally will be treated as having received such dividends in the taxable year in which the distributions were actually made.

The following discussion of tax consequences is for the general information of shareholders that are subject to tax. Shareholders that are IRAs or other qualified retirement plans are exempt from U.S. federal income taxation under the Code.

Distributions of investment company taxable income are taxable to shareholders as ordinary income. Because The Fund's income is derived primarily from sources that do not pay "qualified dividend income," dividends from The Fund generally are not expected to qualify for taxation at the long-term capital gain rates available to individuals on qualified dividend income. Furthermore, dividends from The Fund generally are not expected to qualify for the dividends-received deduction for shareholders that are corporations. Distributions of net capital gain ("capital gain dividends") generally are taxable to shareholders as long-term capital gain, regardless of the length of time the shares of the Fund have been held by such shareholders.

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No Fund expects to have significant investment in REITs, but to the extent the Fund invests in REITs, the Fund may designates dividends it pays to its shareholders as "section 199A dividends" so that such shareholder may be eligible for a 20% deduction with respect to such dividends. The amount of section 199A dividends that the Fund may pay and report to its shareholders is limited to the excess of the ordinary REIT dividends, other than capital gain dividends and portions of REIT dividends designated as qualified dividend income that the Fund receives from REITs for a taxable year over the Fund's expenses allocable to such dividends.

Distributions by the Fund in excess of the Fund's current and accumulated earnings and profits will be treated as a return of capital to the extent of (and in reduction of) a shareholder's tax basis in his or her Fund shares and any such amount in excess of that basis will be treated as gain from the sale of shares, as discussed below. Distributions of investment company taxable income and net capital gain will be taxable as described above, whether received in additional cash or shares. Shareholders electing to receive distributions in the form of additional shares will have a cost basis for U.S. federal income tax purposes in each share so received equal to the amount of cash the shareholder could have received.

A redemption of Fund shares by a shareholder will result in the recognition of taxable gain or loss in an amount equal to the difference between the amount realized and the shareholder's tax basis in his or her Fund shares. Such gain or loss is treated as a capital gain or loss if the shares are held as capital assets. However, any loss realized upon the redemption of shares within six months from the date of their purchase will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any amounts treated as capital gain dividends during such six-month period. All or a portion of any loss realized upon the redemption of shares may be disallowed to the extent shares are purchased (including shares acquired by means of reinvested dividends) within 30 days before or after such redemption.

An additional 3.8% Medicare tax will be imposed on certain investment company taxable income (including ordinary dividends and capital gain distributions received from The Fund and net gains from redemptions or other taxable dispositions of Fund shares) of U.S. individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person's "modified adjusted gross income" (in the case of an individual) or "adjusted gross income" (in the case of an estate or trust) exceed certain threshold amounts.

Under the Code, The Fund will be required to report to the Internal Revenue Service all distributions of taxable income and capital gains as well as gross proceeds from the redemption or exchange of Fund shares, except in the case of certain exempt shareholders. Under the

backup withholding provisions of Section 3406 of the Code, distributions of investment company taxable income and net capital gain and proceeds from the redemption or exchange of the shares of the Fund may be subject to withholding of U.S. federal income tax (currently, at a 24% rate) in the case of non-exempt shareholders who fail to furnish the Fund with their taxpayer identification numbers and with required certifications regarding their status under the U.S. federal income tax law, or if the Fund is notified by the IRS or a broker that withholding is required due to an incorrect social security number or taxpayer identification number or a previous failure to report taxable interest or dividends. If the withholding provisions are applicable, any such distributions and proceeds, whether taken in cash or reinvested in additional shares, will be reduced by the amounts required to be withheld.

The Fund (or its administrative agent) is required to report to the IRS and furnish to shareholders the cost basis information for sale transactions of shares. Shareholders may elect to have one of several cost basis methods applied to their account when calculating the cost basis of shares sold, including average cost, FIFO or some other specific identification method. Unless you instruct otherwise, The Fund will use average cost as its default cost basis method. If average cost is used for the first sale of shares by a shareholder, the shareholder may only use an alternative cost basis method for shares purchased prospectively. Shareholders should consult with their tax advisors to determine the best cost basis method for their tax situation. Shareholders that hold their shares through a financial intermediary should contact such financial intermediary with respect to reporting of cost basis and available elections for their accounts.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Shareholders

The foregoing discussion relates only to U.S. federal income tax law as applicable to U.S. persons (i.e., U.S. citizens and residents and domestic corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates). Shareholders who are not U.S. persons should consult their tax advisers regarding U.S. and foreign (non-U.S.) tax consequences of ownership of shares of the Fund, including the likelihood that distributions to them would be subject to withholding of U.S. federal income tax at a rate of 30% (or at a lower rate under a tax treaty) and the possibility they may be subject to U.S. estate tax. A portion of The Fund's distributions received by a foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder may, however, be exempt from U.S. withholding tax to the extent properly reported by the Fund as attributable to U.S. source interest income and short-term capital gains. If a foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder is eligible for a reduced rate of withholding tax under an applicable tax treaty, the foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder will be required to provide an applicable IRS Form W-8 certifying its entitlement to benefits under the treaty in order to obtain a reduced rate of withholding tax. However, if the distributions are effectively connected with a U.S. trade or business of the foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder (or, if an income tax treaty applies, attributable to a permanent establishment in the United States of the foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder), then the distributions will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at the rates applicable to U.S. persons, plus, in certain cases where the foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder is a corporation, a branch profits tax at a 30% rate (or lower rate provided in an applicable treaty). If the foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder is subject to such U.S. income tax on a distribution, then the Fund is not required to withhold U.S. federal tax if the foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder complies with applicable certification and disclosure requirements.

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Ordinary dividends, paid to a foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder that fails to make certain required certifications, or that is a "foreign financial institution" as defined in Section 1471 of the Code and that does not meet the requirements imposed on foreign financial institutions by Section 1471, are generally subject to a U.S. withholding tax at a 30% rate. A foreign (non-U.S.) shareholder may be exempt from the withholding described in this paragraph under an intergovernmental agreement between the U.S. and a foreign government, provided that the shareholder and the applicable foreign government comply with the terms of such agreement. While withholding described in this paragraph would have also applied to payments of gross proceeds from the sale or other disposition of shares on or after January 1, 2019, recently proposed Treasury regulations eliminate such withholding on payments of gross proceeds entirely. Taxpayers generally may rely on these proposed Treasury regulations until final Treasury regulations are issued.

Options, Futures, Forward Contracts and Swap Agreements

To the extent such investments are permissible for The Fund, The Fund's transactions in options, futures contracts, hedging transactions, forward contracts, straddles and foreign (non-U.S.) currencies will be subject to special tax rules (including mark-to-market, constructive sale, straddle, wash sale and short sale rules), the effect of which may be to accelerate income to the Fund, defer losses to the Fund, cause adjustments in the holding periods of the Fund's securities, convert long-term capital gains into short-term capital gains and convert short-term capital losses into long-term capital losses. These rules could therefore affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to shareholders.

Passive Foreign Investment Companies

Investment by the Fund in a "passive foreign investment company" ("PFIC") could subject the Fund to a U.S. federal income tax (including interest charges) on distributions received from the company or on proceeds received from the disposition of shares in the company, which tax cannot be eliminated by making distributions to Fund shareholders. However, the Fund may elect to treat a PFIC as a "qualified electing fund" ("QEF election"), in which case the Fund will be required to include its share of the company's income and net capital gains annually, regardless of whether it receives any distribution from the company.

The Fund also may make an election to "mark to market" the gains (and to a limited extent losses) in such holdings as though it had sold and repurchased its holdings in those PFICs on the last day of the Fund's taxable year. Such gains and losses are treated as ordinary income and loss. The QEF and mark-to-market elections may accelerate the recognition of income (without the receipt of cash) and increase the amount required to be distributed for the Fund to avoid taxation. Making either of these elections therefore may require the Fund to liquidate other investments (including when it is not advantageous to do so) to meet its distribution requirement, which also may accelerate the recognition of gain and affect the Fund's total return.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Currency Transactions

The Fund's transactions in foreign (non-U.S.) currencies, foreign (non-U.S.) currency-denominated fixed income securities and certain foreign (non-U.S.) currency options, futures contracts and forward contracts (and similar instruments) may give rise to ordinary income or loss to the extent such income or loss results from fluctuations in the value of the foreign (non-U.S.) currency concerned.

Foreign (Non-U.S.) Taxation

Income received by the Fund from sources within foreign (non-U.S.) countries may be subject to withholding and other taxes imposed by such countries. Tax treaties and conventions between certain countries and the U.S. may reduce or eliminate such taxes. If more than 50% of the value of the Fund's total assets at the close of its taxable year consists of securities of foreign (non-U.S.) corporations, the Fund may be able to elect to "pass through" to the Fund's shareholders the amount of eligible foreign (non-U.S.) income and similar taxes paid by the Fund. If this election is made, a shareholder generally subject to tax will be required to include in gross income (in addition to taxable dividends actually received) his or her pro rata share of the foreign (non-U.S.) taxes paid by the Fund, and may be entitled either to deduct (as an itemized deduction) his or her pro rata share of foreign (non-U.S.) taxes in computing his or her taxable income or to use it as a foreign (non-U.S.) tax credit against his or her U.S. federal income tax liability, subject to certain limitations. In particular, a shareholder must hold his or her shares (without protection from risk of loss) on the ex-dividend date and for at least 15 more days during the 30-day period surrounding the ex-dividend date to be eligible to claim a foreign (non-U.S.) tax credit with respect to a gain dividend. No deduction for foreign (non-U.S.) taxes may be claimed by a shareholder who does not itemize deductions. Each shareholder will be notified within 60 days after the close of The Fund's taxable year whether the foreign (non-U.S.) taxes paid by the Fund will "pass through" for that year.

Generally, a credit for foreign (non-U.S.) taxes is subject to the limitation that it may not exceed the shareholder's U.S. tax attributable to his or her total foreign (non-U.S.) source taxable income. For this purpose, if the pass-through election is made, the source of the Fund's income will flow through to shareholders of the Fund. With respect to the Fund, gains from the sale of securities will be treated as derived from U.S. sources and certain currency fluctuation gains, including fluctuation gains from foreign (non-U.S.) currency-denominated fixed income securities, receivables and payables will be treated as ordinary income derived from U.S. sources. The limitation on the foreign (non-U.S.) tax credit is applied separately to foreign (non-U.S.) source passive income, and to certain other

47

types of income. A shareholder may be unable to claim a credit for the full amount of his or her proportionate share of the foreign (non-U.S.) taxes paid by the Fund.

Original Issue Discount, Pay-In-Kind and Market Discount Securities

Investments by the Fund in zero coupon securities, deferred interest securities, other securities with original issue discount (or with market discount if the Fund elects to include market discount in income currently) or pay-in-kind securities will require the Fund to accrue income on such investments for each taxable year, generally prior to the receipt of the corresponding cash payments. However, The Fund must distribute, at least annually, all or substantially all of its net income, including such accrued income, to shareholders to qualify as a regulated investment company under the Code and avoid U.S. federal income and excise taxes. Therefore, the Fund may have to dispose of portfolio securities under disadvantageous circumstances to generate cash to satisfy its distribution requirements.

By holding the foregoing kinds of securities, the Fund may be required to pay out as an income distribution each year an amount which is greater than the total amount of cash interest the Fund actually received. Such distributions may be made from the cash assets of the Fund or by liquidation of portfolio securities, if necessary (including when it is not advantageous to do so). The Fund may realize gains or losses from such liquidations. In the event the Fund realizes net capital gains from such transactions, its shareholders may receive a larger capital gain distribution, if any, than they would in the absence of such transactions.

If a shareholder recognizes a loss with respect to Fund shares of $2 million or more for an individual shareholder, or $10 million or more for a corporate shareholder, in any single taxable year (or a greater amount over a combination of years), the shareholder must file with the IRS a disclosure statement on Form 8886. Shareholders who own portfolio securities directly are in many cases excepted from this reporting requirement but, under current guidance, shareholders of regulated investment companies are not excepted. A shareholder who fails to make the required disclosure to the IRS may be subject to substantial penalties. The fact that a loss is reportable under these regulations does not affect the legal determination of whether or not the taxpayer's treatment of the loss is proper. Shareholders should consult with their tax advisers to determine the applicability of these regulations in light of their individual circumstances.

Shareholders of the Fund may be subject to state and local taxes on distributions received from the Fund and on redemptions of the Fund's shares.

A brief explanation of the form and character of the distribution accompany each distribution. In January of each year the Fund issues to each shareholder a statement of the U.S. federal income tax status of all distributions.

Shareholders should consult their tax advisers about the application of U.S. federal, state and local and foreign (non-U.S.) tax law in light of their particular situation.

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INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

Grant Thornton LLP, located at 2001 Market Street, Suite 700, Philadelphia, PA 19103 serves as the Fund's independent registered public accounting firm, providing services including (i) audit of annual financial statements, (ii) review of certain documents to be filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and (iii) other audit related and tax services including preparation of the Fund's tax returns.

LEGAL COUNSEL

Blank Rome LLP, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020, serves as the Trust's legal counsel.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The financial statements of the Fund included in the Fund's most recent Annual Report to shareholders for the fiscal period ended July 31, 2021, including the notes thereto, are incorporated by reference into this SAI. These financial statements include the Fund's portfolios of investments, statements of assets and liabilities, statements of operations, statements of changes in net assets, financial highlights and notes. You may obtain a copy of the Fund's Semi-Annual Report and Annual Report without charge by calling the Tactical Dividend and Momentum Fund at 1-844-828-3212.

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APPENDIX A

PROXY VOTING PROCEDURES

Hanlon Investment Management, INc.

ACCEPTANCE OF PROXY VOTING AUTHORITY

POLICY

It is the Firm's policy, where it has accepted responsibility to vote proxies on behalf of a particular client, to vote such proxies in the best interest of its clients and ensure that the vote is not the product of an actual or potential conflict of interest. For clients that are subject to ERISA, it is the Firm's policy to follow the provisions of any ERISA plan's governing documents in the voting of plan securities, unless it determines that to do so would breach its fiduciary duties under ERISA.

RESPONSIBILITY

Where the Firm has accepted responsibility to vote proxies on behalf a particular client, the Chief Investment Officer is responsible for ensuring that proxies are voted in a manner consistent with the proxy voting guidelines adopted by the Firm (the "Proxy Voting Guidelines") and the Firm's policies and procedures.

PROCEDURES

The Firm may vote client proxies where a client requests and the Firm accepts such responsibility, or in the case of an employee benefit plan, as defined by ERISA, where such responsibility has been properly delegated to, and assumed by, the Firm. In such circumstances the Firm will only cast proxy votes in a manner consistent with the best interest of its clients or, to the extent applicable, their beneficiaries. Absent special circumstances, which are further discussed below, all proxies will be voted consistent with the guidelines attached to the Compliance Manual on Exhibit E ("Proxy Voting Guidelines") and the Firm's policies and procedures. The Firm shall, in its Form ADV, generally disclose to clients information about these policies and procedures and how clients may obtain information on how the Firm voted their proxies when applicable. At any time, a client may contact the Firm to request information about how it voted proxies for their securities. It is generally the Firm's policy not to disclose its proxy voting records to unaffiliated third parties or special interest groups.

The Firm's Proxy Voting Committee will be responsible for monitoring corporate actions, making proxy voting decisions, and ensuring that proxies are submitted in a timely manner. The Proxy Voting Committee may delegate the responsibility to vote client proxies to one or more persons affiliated with the Firm (such person(s) together with the Proxy Voting Committee are hereafter collectively referred to as "Responsible Voting Parties") consistent with the Proxy Voting Guidelines. Specifically, when the Firm receives proxy proposals where the Proxy Voting Guidelines outline its general position as voting either "for" or "against," the proxy will be voted by one of the Responsible Voting Parties in accordance with the Firm's Proxy Voting Guidelines. When the Firm receives proxy proposals where the Proxy Voting Guidelines do not contemplate the issue or otherwise outline its general position as voting on a case-by-case basis, the proxy will be forwarded to the Proxy Voting Committee, which will review the proposal and either vote the proxy or instruct one of the Responsible Voting Parties on how to vote the proxy.

It is intended that the Proxy Voting Guidelines will be applied with a measure of flexibility. Accordingly, except as otherwise provided in these policies and procedures, the Responsible Voting Parties may vote a proxy contrary to the Proxy Voting Guidelines if, in the sole determination of the Proxy Voting Committee, it is determined that such action is in the best interest of the Firm's clients. In the exercise of such discretion, the Proxy Voting Committee may take into account a wide array of factors relating to the matter under consideration, the nature of the proposal, and the company involved. Similarly, poor past performance, uncertainties about management and future directions, and other factors may lead to a conclusion that particular proposals by an issuer present unacceptable investment risks and should not be supported. In addition, the proposals should be evaluated in context. For example, a particular proposal may be acceptable standing alone, but objectionable when part of an existing or proposed package, such as where the effect may be to entrench management. Special circumstances or instructions from clients may also justify casting different votes for different clients with respect to the same proxy vote.

The Responsible Voting Parties will document the rationale for all proxy voted contrary to the Proxy Voting Guidelines. Such information will be maintained as part of the Firm's recordkeeping process. In performing its responsibilities the Proxy Voting Committee may consider information from one or more sources including, but not limited to, management of the company presenting the proposal, shareholder groups, legal counsel, and independent proxy research services. In all cases, however, the ultimate decisions on how to vote proxies are made by the Proxy Voting Committee.

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ERISA Plans

Plans managed by the Firm governed by ERISA shall be administered consistent with the terms of the governing plan documents and applicable provisions of ERISA. In cases where the Firm has been delegated sole proxy voting discretion, these policies and procedures will be followed subject to the fiduciary responsibility standards of ERISA. These standards generally require fiduciaries to act prudently and to discharge their duties solely in the interest of participants and beneficiaries. The Department of Labor has indicated that voting decisions of ERISA fiduciaries must generally focus on the course that would most likely increase the value of the stock being voted.

The documents governing ERISA individual account plans may set forth various procedures for voting "employer securities" held by the plan. Where authority over the investment of plan assets is granted to plan participants, many individual account plans provide that proxies for employer securities will be voted in accordance with directions received from plan participants as to shares allocated to their plan accounts. In some cases, the governing plan documents may further provide that unallocated shares and/or allocated shares for which no participant directions are received will be voted in accordance with a proportional voting method in which such shares are voted proportionately in the same manner as are allocated shares for which directions from participants have been received.

Conflicts of Interest

The Firm may occasionally be subject to conflicts of interest in the voting of proxies due to business or personal relationships it maintains with persons having an interest in the outcome of certain votes. For example, the Firm may provide services to accounts owned or controlled by companies whose management is soliciting proxies. The Firm, along with any affiliates and/or employees, may also occasionally have business or personal relationships with other proponents of proxy proposals, participants in proxy contests, corporate directors, or candidates for directorships.

If the Responsible Voting Parties become aware of any potential or actual conflict of interest relating to a particular proxy proposal, they will promptly report such conflict to the Committee. Conflicts of interest will be handled in various ways depending on their type and materiality of the conflict. The Firm will take the following steps to ensure that its proxy voting decisions are made in the best interest of its clients and are not the product of such conflict:

· Where the Proxy Voting Guidelines outline the Firm's voting position, as either "for" or "against" such proxy proposal, voting will be accordance with the its Proxy Voting Guidelines.
· Where the Proxy Voting Guidelines outline the Firm's voting position to be determined on a "case-by-case" basis for such proxy proposal, or such proposal is not contemplated in the Proxy Voting Guidelines, then one of the two following methods will be selected by the Committee depending upon the facts and circumstances of each situation and the requirements of applicable law:
o Voting the proxy in accordance with the voting recommendation of a non- affiliated third party vendor; or
o Provide the client with sufficient information regarding the proxy proposal and obtain the client's consent or direction before voting.

Third Party Delegation

The Firm may delegate to a non-affiliated third party vendor, the responsibility to review proxy proposals and make voting recommendations to the Firm. The Chief Investment Officer will ensure that any third party recommendations followed will be consistent with the Proxy Voting Guidelines. In all cases, however, the ultimate decisions on how to vote proxies are made by the Committee.

Mutual Funds

In the event that the Firm acts as investment adviser to a closed-end and/or open-end registered investment company and is responsible for voting their proxies, such proxies will be voted in accordance with any applicable investment restrictions of the Fund and, to the extent applicable, any proxy voting procedures or resolutions or other instructions approved by an authorized person of the Fund.

Special Circumstances

The Firm may choose not to vote proxies in certain situations or for certain accounts, such as: (i) where a client has informed the Firm that they wish to retain the right to vote the proxy; (ii) where the Firm deems the cost of voting the proxy would exceed any anticipated benefit to the client; (iii) where a proxy is received for a client that has terminated the Firm's services; (iv) where a proxy is received for a security that the Firm no longer manages (i.e., the Firm had previously sold the entire position); and/or (v) where the exercise of voting rights could restrict the ability of an account's portfolio manager to freely trade the security in question (as is the case, for example, in certain foreign jurisdictions known as "blocking markets").

In addition, certain accounts over which the Firm has proxy-voting discretion may participate in securities lending programs administered by the custodian or a third party. Because title to loaned securities passes to the borrower, the Firm will be unable to vote any security that is out on loan to a borrower on a proxy record date. If the Firm has investment discretion, however, the Firm shall reserve the right to instruct the lending agent to terminate a loan in situations where the matter to be voted upon is deemed to be material to the investment and the benefits of voting the security are deemed to outweigh the costs of terminating the loan.

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BOOKS AND RECORDS

In its books and records, the Firm will maintain a copy of the following documents:

· Proxy statement that the Firm receives regarding client's securities;
· Votes that the Firm casts on behalf of a client;
· Any document the Firm created that was material to making a decision on how to vote proxies on behalf of a client or that memorialize the basis for such decision; and
· Written client request for information on how the Firm voted proxies on behalf of the requesting client and a copy of the Firm's written response to any (written or verbal) client request for information on how the Firm voted proxies on behalf of the requesting client.

The Firm may rely upon the Commission's EDGAR system to maintain certain records referred to above.

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APPENDIX B

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES RATINGS

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES RATINGS

Short-Term Credit Ratings

An S&P Global Ratings short-term issue credit rating is generally assigned to those obligations considered short-term in the relevant market. The following summarizes the rating categories used by S&P Global Ratings for short-term issues:

"A-1" - A short-term obligation rated "A-1" is rated in the highest category by S&P Global Ratings. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is strong. Within this category, certain obligations are designated with a plus sign (+). This indicates that the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitment on these obligations is extremely strong.

"A-2" - A short-term obligation rated "A-2" is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher rating categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is satisfactory.

"A-3" - A short-term obligation rated "A-3" exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to weaken an obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

"B" - A short-term obligation rated "B" is regarded as vulnerable and has significant speculative characteristics. The obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments; however, it faces major ongoing uncertainties that could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments.

"C" - A short-term obligation rated "C" is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

"D" - A short-term obligation rated "D" is in default or in breach of an imputed promise. For non-hybrid capital instruments, the "D" rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due, unless S&P Global Ratings believes that such payments will be made within any stated grace period. However, any stated grace period longer than five business days will be treated as five business days. The "D" rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions. An obligation's rating is lowered to "D" if it is subject to a distressed exchange offer.

Local Currency and Foreign Currency Ratings - S&P Global Ratings' issuer credit ratings make a distinction between foreign currency ratings and local currency ratings. A foreign currency rating on an issuer will differ from the local currency rating on it when the obligor has a different capacity to meet its obligations denominated in its local currency, versus obligations denominated in a foreign currency.

Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") short-term ratings are forward-looking opinions of the relative credit risks of financial obligations with an original maturity of thirteen months or less and reflect both on the likelihood of a default or impairment on contractual financial obligations and the expected financial loss suffered in the event of default or impairment.

Moody's employs the following designations to indicate the relative repayment ability of rated issuers:

"P-1" - Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-1 have a superior ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

"P-2" - Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-2 have a strong ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

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"P-3" - Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-3 have an acceptable ability to repay short-term obligations.

"NP" - Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Not Prime do not fall within any of the Prime rating categories.

"NR" - Is assigned to an unrated issuer.

Fitch, Inc. / Fitch Ratings Ltd. ("Fitch") short-term issuer or obligation rating is based in all cases on the short-term vulnerability to default of the rated entity and relates to the capacity to meet financial obligations in accordance with the documentation governing the relevant obligation. Short-term deposit ratings may be adjusted for loss severity. Short-term ratings are assigned to obligations whose initial maturity is viewed as "short-term" based on market convention. Typically, this means up to 13 months for corporate, sovereign, and structured obligations and up to 36 months for obligations in U.S. public finance markets. The following summarizes the rating categories used by Fitch for short-term obligations:

"F1" - Securities possess the highest short-term credit quality. This designation indicates the strongest intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments; may have an added "+" to denote any exceptionally strong credit feature.

"F2" - Securities possess good short-term credit quality. This designation indicates good intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments.

"F3" - Securities possess fair short-term credit quality. This designation indicates that the intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments is adequate.

"B" - Securities possess speculative short-term credit quality. This designation indicates minimal capacity for timely payment of financial commitments, plus heightened vulnerability to near term adverse changes in financial and economic conditions.

"C" - Securities possess high short-term default risk. Default is a real possibility.

"RD" - Restricted default. Indicates an entity that has defaulted on one or more of its financial commitments, although it continues to meet other financial obligations. Typically applicable to entity ratings only.

"D" - Default. Indicates a broad-based default event for an entity, or the default of a short-term obligation.

Plus (+) or minus (-) - The "F1" rating may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show the relative status within that major rating category.

"NR" - Is assigned to an unrated issue of a rated issuer.

The DBRS® Ratings Limited ("DBRS") short-term debt rating scale provides an opinion on the risk that an issuer will not meet its short-term financial obligations in a timely manner. Ratings are based on quantitative and qualitative considerations relevant to the issuer and the relative ranking of claims. The R-1 and R-2 rating categories are further denoted by the sub-categories "(high)", "(middle)", and "(low)".

The following summarizes the ratings used by DBRS for commercial paper and short-term debt:

"R-1 (high)" - Short-term debt rated "R-1 (high)" is of the highest credit quality. The capacity for the payment of short-term financial obligations as they fall due is exceptionally high. Unlikely to be adversely affected by future events.

"R-1 (middle)" - Short-term debt rated "R-1 (middle)" is of superior credit quality. The capacity for the payment of short-term financial obligations as they fall due is very high. Differs from "R-1 (high)" by a relatively modest degree. Unlikely to be significantly vulnerable to future events.

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"R-1 (low)" - Short-term debt rated "R-1 (low)" is of good credit quality. The capacity for the payment of short-term financial obligations as they fall due is substantial. Overall strength is not as favorable as higher rating categories. May be vulnerable to future events, but qualifying negative factors are considered manageable.

"R-2 (high)" - Short-term debt rated "R-2 (high)" is considered to be at the upper end of adequate credit quality. The capacity for the payment of short-term financial obligations as they fall due is acceptable. May be vulnerable to future events.

"R-2 (middle)" - Short-term debt rated "R-2 (middle)" is considered to be of adequate credit quality. The capacity for the payment of short-term financial obligations as they fall due is acceptable. May be vulnerable to future events or may be exposed to other factors that could reduce credit quality.

"R-2 (low)" - Short-term debt rated "R-2 (low)" is considered to be at the lower end of adequate credit quality. The capacity for the payment of short-term financial obligations as they fall due is acceptable. May be vulnerable to future events. A number of challenges are present that could affect the issuer's ability to meet such obligations.

"R-3" - Short-term debt rated "R-3" is considered to be at the lowest end of adequate credit quality. There is a capacity for the payment of short-term financial obligations as they fall due. May be vulnerable to future events and the certainty of meeting such obligations could be impacted by a variety of developments.

"R-4" - Short-term debt rated "R-4" is considered to be of speculative credit quality. The capacity for the payment of short-term financial obligations as they fall due is uncertain.

"R-5" - Short-term debt rated "R-5" is considered to be of highly speculative credit quality. There is a high level of uncertainty as to the capacity to meet short-term financial obligations as they fall due.

"D" - Short-term debt rated "D" is assigned when the issuer has filed under any applicable bankruptcy, insolvency or winding up statute or there is a failure to satisfy an obligation after the exhaustion of grace periods, a downgrade to "D" may occur. DBRS may also use "SD" (Selective Default) in cases where only some securities are impacted, such as the case of a "distressed exchange".

Long-Term Credit Ratings

The following summarizes the ratings used by S&P Global Ratings for long-term issues:

"AAA" - An obligation rated "AAA" has the highest rating assigned by S&P Global Ratings. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is extremely strong.

"AA" - An obligation rated "AA" differs from the highest-rated obligations only to a small degree. The obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is very strong.

"A" - An obligation rated "A" is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher-rated categories. However, the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is still strong.

"BBB" - An obligation rated "BBB" exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to weaken the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

"BB," "B," "CCC," "CC" and "C" - Obligations rated "BB," "B," "CCC," "CC" and "C" are regarded as having significant speculative characteristics. "BB" indicates the least degree of speculation and "C" the highest. While such obligations will likely have some quality and protective characteristics, these may be outweighed by large uncertainties or major exposure to adverse conditions.

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"BB" - An obligation rated "BB" is less vulnerable to nonpayment than other speculative issues. However, it faces major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial, or economic conditions that could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

"B" - An obligation rated "B" is more vulnerable to nonpayment than obligations rated "BB", but the obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation. Adverse business, financial, or economic conditions will likely impair the obligor's capacity or willingness to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

"CCC" - An obligation rated "CCC" is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitments on the obligation. In the event of adverse business, financial, or economic conditions, the obligor is not likely to have the capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

"CC" - An obligation rated "CC" is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment. The "CC" rating is used when a default has not yet occurred but S&P Global Ratings expects default to be a virtual certainty, regardless of the anticipated time to default.

"C" - An obligation rated "C" is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment, and the obligation is expected to have lower relative seniority or lower ultimate recovery compared with obligations that are rated higher.

"D" - An obligation rated "D" is in default or in breach of an imputed promise. For non-hybrid capital instruments, the "D" rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due, unless S&P Global Ratings believes that such payments will be made within five business days in the absence of a stated grace period or within the earlier of the stated grace period or 30 calendar days. The "D" rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions. An obligation's rating is lowered to "D" if it is subject to a distressed exchange offer.

Plus (+) or minus (-) - The ratings from "AA" to "CCC" may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the major rating categories.

"NR" - This indicates that a rating has not been assigned, or is no longer assigned.

Local Currency and Foreign Currency Risks - S&P Global Ratings' issuer credit ratings make a distinction between foreign currency ratings and local currency ratings. An issuer's foreign currency rating will differ from its local currency rating when the obligor has a different capacity to meet its obligations denominated in its local currency, vs. obligations denominated in a foreign currency.

Moody's long-term ratings are forward-looking opinions of the relative credit risks of financial obligations with an original maturity of one year or more. Such ratings reflect both on the likelihood of default or impairment on contractual financial obligations and the expected financial loss suffered in the event of default or impairment. The following summarizes the ratings used by Moody's for long-term debt:

"Aaa" - Obligations rated "Aaa" are judged to be of the highest quality, subject to the lowest level of credit risk.

"Aa" - Obligations rated "Aa" are judged to be of high quality and are subject to very low credit risk.

"A" - Obligations rated "A" are judged to be upper-medium grade and are subject to low credit risk.

"Baa" - Obligations rated "Baa" are judged to be medium-grade and subject to moderate credit risk and as such may possess certain speculative characteristics.

"Ba" - Obligations rated "Ba" are judged to be speculative and are subject to substantial credit risk.

"B" - Obligations rated "B" are considered speculative and are subject to high credit risk.

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"Caa" - Obligations rated "Caa" are judged to be speculative of poor standing and are subject to very high credit risk.

"Ca" - Obligations rated "Ca" are highly speculative and are likely in, or very near, default, with some prospect of recovery of principal and interest.

"C" - Obligations rated "C" are the lowest rated and are typically in default, with little prospect for recovery of principal or interest.

Note: Moody's appends numerical modifiers 1, 2, and 3 to each generic rating classification from "Aa" through "Caa." The modifier 1 indicates that the obligation ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category; the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking; and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category.

"NR" - Is assigned to unrated obligations.

The following summarizes long-term ratings used by Fitch:

"AAA" - Securities considered to be of the highest credit quality. "AAA" ratings denote the lowest expectation of credit risk. They are assigned only in cases of exceptionally strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is highly unlikely to be adversely affected by foreseeable events.

"AA" - Securities considered to be of very high credit quality. "AA" ratings denote expectations of very low credit risk. They indicate very strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is not significantly vulnerable to foreseeable events.

"A" - Securities considered to be of high credit quality. "A" ratings denote expectations of low credit risk. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered strong. This capacity may, nevertheless, be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic conditions than is the case for higher ratings.

"BBB" - Securities considered to be of good credit quality. "BBB" ratings indicate that expectations of credit risk are currently low. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate, but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity.

"BB" - Securities considered to be speculative. "BB" ratings indicate that there is an elevated vulnerability to credit risk, particularly in the event of adverse changes in business or economic conditions over time; however, business or financial alternatives may be available to allow financial commitments to be met.

"B" - Securities considered to be highly speculative. "B" ratings indicate that material credit risk is present.

"CCC" - A "CCC" rating indicates that substantial credit risk is present.

"CC" - A "CC" rating indicates very high levels of credit risk.

"C" - A "C" rating indicates exceptionally high levels of credit risk.

Defaulted obligations typically are not assigned "RD" or "D" ratings but are instead rated in the "CCC" to "C" rating categories, depending on their recovery prospects and other relevant characteristics. Fitch believes that this approach better aligns obligations that have comparable overall expected loss but varying vulnerability to default and loss.

Plus (+) or minus (-) may be appended to a rating to denote relative status within major rating categories. Such suffixes are not added to the "AAA" obligation rating category, or to corporate finance obligation ratings in the categories below "CCC".

"NR" - Is assigned to an unrated issue of a rated issuer.

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The DBRS long-term rating scale provides an opinion on the risk of default. That is, the risk that an issuer will fail to satisfy its financial obligations in accordance with the terms under which an obligation has been issued. Ratings are based on quantitative and qualitative considerations relevant to the issuer, and the relative ranking of claims. All rating categories other than AAA and D also contain subcategories "(high)" and "(low)". The absence of either a "(high)" or "(low)" designation indicates the rating is in the middle of the category. The following summarizes the ratings used by DBRS for long-term debt:

"AAA" - Long-term debt rated "AAA" is of the highest credit quality. The capacity for the payment of financial obligations is exceptionally high and unlikely to be adversely affected by future events.

"AA" - Long-term debt rated "AA" is of superior credit quality. The capacity for the payment of financial obligations is considered high. Credit quality differs from "AAA" only to a small degree. Unlikely to be significantly vulnerable to future events.

"A" - Long-term debt rated "A" is of good credit quality. The capacity for the payment of financial obligations is substantial, but of lesser credit quality than "AA." May be vulnerable to future events, but qualifying negative factors are considered manageable.

"BBB" - Long-term debt rated "BBB" is of adequate credit quality. The capacity for the payment of financial obligations is considered acceptable. May be vulnerable to future events.

"BB" - Long-term debt rated "BB" is of speculative, non-investment grade credit quality. The capacity for the payment of financial obligations is uncertain. Vulnerable to future events.

"B" - Long-term debt rated "B" is of highly speculative credit quality. There is a high level of uncertainty as to the capacity to meet financial obligations.

"CCC", "CC" and "C" - Long-term debt rated in any of these categories is of very highly speculative credit quality. In danger of defaulting on financial obligations. There is little difference between these three categories, although "CC" and "C" ratings are normally applied to obligations that are seen as highly likely to default, or subordinated to obligations rated in the "CCC" to "B" range. Obligations in respect of which default has not technically taken place but is considered inevitable may be rated in the "C" category.

"D" - A security rated "D" is assigned when the issuer has filed under any applicable bankruptcy, insolvency or winding up statute or there is a failure to satisfy an obligation after the exhaustion of grace periods, a downgrade to "D" may occur. DBRS may also use "SD" (Selective Default) in cases where only some securities are impacted, such as the case of a "distressed exchange".

Municipal Note Ratings

An S&P Global Ratings U.S. municipal note rating reflects S&P Global Ratings' opinion about the liquidity factors and market access risks unique to the notes. Notes due in three years or less will likely receive a note rating. Notes with an original maturity of more than three years will most likely receive a long-term debt rating. In determining which type of rating, if any, to assign, S&P Global Ratings' analysis will review the following considerations:

h Amortization schedule - the larger the final maturity relative to other maturities, the more likely it will be treated as a note; and
h Source of payment - the more dependent the issue is on the market for its refinancing, the more likely it will be treated as a note.

Municipal Short-Term Note rating symbols are as follows:

"SP-1" - A municipal note rated "SP-1" exhibits a strong capacity to pay principal and interest. An issue determined to possess a very strong capacity to pay debt service is given a plus (+) designation.

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"SP-2" - A municipal note rated "SP-2" exhibits a satisfactory capacity to pay principal and interest, with some vulnerability to adverse financial and economic changes over the term of the notes.

"SP-3" - A municipal note rated "SP-3" exhibits a speculative capacity to pay principal and interest.

"D" - This rating is assigned upon failure to pay the note when due, completion of a distressed exchange offer, or the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions.

Moody's uses the Municipal Investment Grade ("MIG") scale to rate U.S. municipal bond anticipation notes of up to five years maturity. Municipal notes rated on the MIG scale may be secured by either pledged revenues or proceeds of a take-out financing received prior to note maturity. MIG ratings expire at the maturity of the obligation, and the issuer's long-term rating is only one consideration in assigning the MIG rating. MIG ratings are divided into three levels - "MIG-1" through "MIG-3" while speculative grade short-term obligations are designated "SG". The following summarizes the ratings used by Moody's for short-term municipal obligations:

"MIG-1" - This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by established cash flows, highly reliable liquidity support, or demonstrated broad-based access to the market for refinancing.

"MIG-2" - This designation denotes strong credit quality. Margins of protection are ample, although not as large as in the preceding group.

"MIG-3" - This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Liquidity and cash-flow protection may be narrow, and market access for refinancing is likely to be less well-established.

"SG" - This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Debt instruments in this category may lack sufficient margins of protection.

"NR" - Is assigned to an unrated obligation.

In the case of variable rate demand obligations ("VRDOs"), a two-component rating is assigned: a long or short-term debt rating and a demand obligation rating. The first element represents Moody's evaluation of risk associated with scheduled principal and interest payments. The second element represents Moody's evaluation of risk associated with the ability to receive purchase price upon demand ("demand feature"). The second element uses a rating from a variation of the MIG scale called the Variable Municipal Investment Grade or "VMIG" scale. The rating transitions on the VMIG scale differ from those on the Prime scale to reflect the risk that external liquidity support generally will terminate if the issuer's long-term rating drops below investment grade.

"VMIG-1" - This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by the superior short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

"VMIG-2" - This designation denotes strong credit quality. Good protection is afforded by the strong short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

"VMIG-3" - This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Adequate protection is afforded by the satisfactory short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

"SG" - This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Demand features rated in this category may be supported by a liquidity provider that does not have an investment grade short-term rating or may lack the structural and/or legal protections necessary to ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

"NR" - Is assigned to an unrated obligation.

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About Credit Ratings

An S&P Global Ratings issue credit rating is a forward-looking opinion about the creditworthiness of an obligor with respect to a specific financial obligation, a specific class of financial obligations, or a specific financial program (including ratings on medium-term note programs and commercial paper programs). It takes into consideration the creditworthiness of guarantors, insurers, or other forms of credit enhancement on the obligation and takes into account the currency in which the obligation is denominated. The opinion reflects S&P Global Ratings' view of the obligor's capacity and willingness to meet its financial commitments as they come due, and this opinion may assess terms, such as collateral security and subordination, which could affect ultimate payment in the event of default.

Ratings assigned on Moody's global long-term and short-term rating scales are forward-looking opinions of the relative credit risks of financial obligations issued by non-financial corporates, financial institutions, structured finance vehicles, project finance vehicles, and public sector entities.

Fitch's credit ratings relating to issuers are an opinion on the relative ability of an entity to meet financial commitments, such as interest, preferred dividends, repayment of principal, insurance claims or counterparty obligations. Fitch credit ratings are used by investors as indications of the likelihood of receiving the money owed to them in accordance with the terms on which they invested. Fitch's credit ratings cover the global spectrum of corporate, sovereign financial, bank, insurance, and public finance entities (including supranational and sub-national entities) and the securities or other obligations they issue, as well as structured finance securities backed by receivables or other financial assets.

Credit ratings provided by DBRS are forward-looking opinions about credit risk which reflect the creditworthiness of an issuer, rated entity, security and/or obligation. Credit ratings are not statements of fact. While historical statistics and performance can be important considerations, credit ratings are not based solely on such; they include subjective considerations and involve expectations for future performance that cannot be guaranteed. To the extent that future events and economic conditions do not match expectations, credit ratings assigned to issuers, entities, securities and/or obligations can change. Credit ratings are also based on approved and applicable Methodologies ("Methodologies"), which are periodically updated and when material changes are deemed necessary, this may also lead to rating changes.

Credit ratings typically provide an opinion on the risk that investors may not be repaid in accordance with the terms under which the obligation was issued. In some cases, credit ratings may also include consideration for the relative ranking of claims and recovery, should default occur. Credit ratings are meant to provide opinions on relative measures of risk and are not based on expectations of any specific default probability, nor are they meant to predict such.

The data and information on which DBRS bases its opinions is not audited or verified by DBRS, although, DBRS conducts a reasonableness review of information received and relied upon in accordance with its Methodologies and policies.

DBRS uses rating symbols as a concise method of expressing its opinion to the market, but there are a limited number of rating categories for the possible slight risk differentials that exist across the rating spectrum and DBRS does not assert that credit ratings in the same category are of "exactly" the same quality.

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