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07/08/2020 | Press release | Distributed by Public on 07/08/2020 19:52

Sen. Cruz Applauds Two Court Rulings in Favor of Religious Liberty

HOUSTON, Texas - U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), chairman of the Subcommittee on The Constitution, today applauded the latest two Supreme Court decisions protecting religious liberty for every American.

On the 7-2 ruling in Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania, upholding the Trump administration's decision to exempt religious non-profits and other organizations from Obamacare's contraception mandate, Sen. Cruz said:

'In 2017, the Trump administration made the right decision to roll back Obamacare's unconstitutional contraceptive mandate for employers of faith. This was long overdue, as the Little Sisters of the Poor and other religious non-profits had been forced time and time again to either violate their faith or pay crippling fines. Today, the Court upheld those exemptions in a major victory for religious liberty and the Little Sisters.'

On the 7-2 ruling in Our Lady of Guadalupe v. Morissey, protecting religious schools' ability to choose its educators, Sen. Cruz said:

'Today, the Court ruled that the First Amendment prevents the government from interfering with a private religious school's right to select and supervise its educators. This comes after another enormous victory for religious schools last week, when the Court ruled that states cannot discriminate against families of faith when administering school choice programs.

He added:

'I'll continue working with my colleagues to protect the freedom to worship and live according to one's faith - without fear of government overreach or oppression.'

Background: Throughout his career, Sen. Cruz has championed religious liberty and fought against Obamacare's contraceptive mandate. In October 2017, Sen. Cruz applauded the Trump administration's religious exemptions to the mandate, calling the move 'both fitting and proper that the executive branch reversed course when the mandate's faults became too glaring to overlook.'

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